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SchiehallionHandmade

Adding preservative to ganache

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Here in the UK this summer we had a particularly hot couple of weeks (over 32c since days). 

 

It has created havoc with some of my chocolates, tablet and fudge. I have chocolate lollys filled with a caramel ganache go mouldy inside 2 weeks. My tablet and fudge had a dark mould starting after a month. In the past my shelf life of 3 months has been fine. 

 

I am considering adding some microbial control to my products, I've been suggested adding 0.4% of potassium sorbate, used in many other products already, aka E202. 

 

Does anyone have any experience in using product to control microbial growth or using this as a preservative? 

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No experience, but I thought fudge lasted forever. What are your tablets?  Not solid chocolate bars?

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2 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

No experience, but I thought fudge lasted forever. What are your tablets?  Not solid chocolate bars?

Is the tablet @SchiehallionHandmade mentioned perhaps the Scottish tablet candy, which is basically milk and sugar and sugar and sugar?


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

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Yes, I have use this quite frequently with success. Make sure to use the absolute minimum required because even though it seems like a very very small amount, it can affect the taste of your ganache. Of course, to the average pallet, most people would not notice it all. 


Jeffrey Stern

www.jeffreygstern.com

http://bit.ly/cKwUL4

http://destination-ecuador.net

cocoapodman at gmail dot com

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

Is the tablet @SchiehallionHandmade mentioned perhaps the Scottish tablet candy, which is basically milk and sugar and sugar and sugar?

 

Oh, maybe, I'd never heard of that, always fun to learn about different types of sweets ... 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tablet_(confectionery)

https://www.thespruceeats.com/traditional-home-made-scottish-tablet-435825

 

Even if it's softer than fudge I would think all that sugar would inhibit mold growth ... already way more than 50% sugar by weight then you cook most of the liquid off 🤔

 

 

 


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

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4 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

 

Oh, maybe, I'd never heard of that, always fun to learn about different types of sweets ... 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tablet_(confectionery)

https://www.thespruceeats.com/traditional-home-made-scottish-tablet-435825

 

Even if it's softer than fudge I would think all that sugar would inhibit mold growth ... already way more than 50% sugar by weight then you cook most of the liquid off 🤔

 

 

 

 

The tablet I ate in Scotland earlier this summer was much harder than fudge.

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MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Thanks all, Scottish tablet is sugar. Sugar and more sugar! 

 

Fudge is half cream. My Scottish tablet is butter, cup milk, 1kg sugar, tin of condensed milk. Beat it, pour in pan, eat! 

 

Looked back in the threads and found it had been used in the past as an anti microbial agent. 

 

 

 

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On 8/18/2019 at 8:08 PM, Marmalade said:

 Check the water activity level, also known as  Aw. 

What is the best way to do this? I had a ganache go moldy inside a shell (fortunately a batch that I kept for the family) and now I'm super paranoid.

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The very best way is to purchase a water activity meter, but you may not wish to spend the money for that (they start around $2,200). I think most U.S. states have universities that will perform such tests for you (for a fee, of course), and there are often labs around that do them as well. If you are in the U.S., your state agriculture or food safety agency can probably tell you where.

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On 8/18/2019 at 11:45 PM, pastrygirl said:

@SchiehallionHandmade is it going in and out of the fridge and getting condensation that would allow mold to grow? 

The ganache, once it's made is in a sealed piping bag and stored in the fridge till needed. 

 

This is the first time in years I've had this issue im fairly sure it was how they were stored in the shop during hot weather. 

 

But I'm now adding 0.1% potassium sorbate to my ganache and tablet and will see how it goes. 

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