Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

David Ross

eG Cook-Off #83: A Bounty of Sweet Corn

Recommended Posts

My mother used to run a sharp paring knife down the middle of each row of corn, making it easier for young children to eat.    You knew when you were no longer in the catered to age group when she stopped doing this for you, and when she stopped giving you the heart of the watermelon.   

  • Haha 4

eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, here's my take on the crispy split corn with ground chili, pecorino and bacon aioli appetizer that I mentioned upthread

IMG_1318.thumb.jpg.fef5be6641647ef700ea430d8888b512.jpg

The wedges on the right were from an ear of corn that I smoked first.  I didn't really care for that variation.  Might have overdone the smoke.

The pieces on the left were good.  Microwaved in the husk for a couple of minutes, shucked, cut into wedges as I described above, brushed with butter and ground chili then into the CSO on steam bake @ 425°F for 10 min.  I pulled them out, sprinkled with some grated pecorino and put them back in on broil for 5 min to get a little browning. 

If I've got perfect, farm-fresh corn, I'll eat it simply cooked on its own but this is an easy way to turn a few ears of corn into a quick appetizer. It would be fun to play around with different seasonings. 

 

  • Like 6
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

My mother used to run a sharp paring knife down the middle of each row of corn, making it easier for young children to eat.    You knew when you were no longer in the catered to age group when she stopped doing this for you, and when she stopped giving you the heart of the watermelon.   

Hell to get old!

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Earlier I had prepped and frozen some corn.  I made a concentrated corn broth from the cobs and used some of it tonight to make grits.  After the grits were cooked, I added fresh corn kernels.  This was plated and on top went creole shrimp, garnished with  green onions, parsley and feta cheese.

20190910_195017.jpg

  • Like 5
  • Delicious 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooooohhh-WEEEE! I want to eat dinner with YOU!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

Earlier I had prepped and frozen some corn.  I made a concentrated corn broth from the cobs and used some of it tonight to make grits.  After the grits were cooked, I added fresh corn kernels.  This was plated and on top went creole shrimp, garnished with  green onions, parsley and feta cheese.

20190910_195017.jpg

Right in my wheel house

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Earlier I had prepped and frozen some corn.  I made a concentrated corn broth from the cobs and used some of it tonight to make grits.  After the grits were cooked, I added fresh corn kernels.  This was plated and on top went creole shrimp, garnished with  green onions, parsley and feta cheese.

20190910_195017.jpg

Using the corn broth to make grits is the best idea I've heard.  Genius!  I'm never throwing a corn cob away again.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any recommendation on making corn puree?  I'm going to start with the corn stock I made, but from that point on I am considering two options.  Add some corn kernels to the corn stock and just a little fresh thyme, dash salt and pepper.  I considered a bay leaf but think that may be too strong.  Then cook the corn down and puree it with cream.  Then strain to make it silky but a texture like soft mashed potatoes.  Anything else I should add?  Then another option I thought of trying but not so excited about is using the corn stock to make a loose polenta.  I'm not sure though if I would like the grainy sort of texture you get with polenta.  Any thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/11/2019 at 9:57 AM, Kim Shook said:

Using the corn broth to make grits is the best idea I've heard.  Genius!  I'm never throwing a corn cob away again.

Never throw away cobs.   Like bones they carry way to much flavor 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes on thyme. No on bay. Personally I would nix the cream - the fat can dull the vegetal top note. (how effete does that sound!) And then to be contrary i would do just a touch of brown butter as a finish.  Do let us know, 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, heidih said:

Yes on thyme. No on bay. Personally I would nix the cream - the fat can dull the vegetal top note. (how effete does that sound!) And then to be contrary i would do just a touch of brown butter as a finish.  Do let us know, 

Thanks that helps a lot.  I'm starting on it today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...