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ElsieD

Swarvin' in Newfoundland!

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Host's note: the initial title of this thread was "Swarvin' in ???"  as a teaser.  Once the destination was identified as Newfoundland, the title was changed to reflect this.  The initial comments were based on the ??? In the title.

 

 

And we'll soon be off.......culinary adventures to follow.

20190728_143702.jpg


Edited by Smithy Adjusted title after location guessed; added tag; added host's note (log)
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2 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I feel like it's pirate talk.

 

She's got an eye patch and a big sword and she's on a boat with cannons I bet.

 

...and rum.

 

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1 hour ago, Shelby said:

I feel like it's pirate talk.

 

She's got an eye patch and a big sword and she's on a boat with cannons I bet.

Arrrrgghhhh!!!! I agree ye mateys!

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

...and rum.

 

Or screech?  😁

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11 minutes ago, Shelby said:

There are pirates there? 

Used to be lots.  A few books on the matter on Amazon.

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From Wikipedia:

 

Screech-inEdit

Newfoundland Screech is used in a non-obligatory ceremony known as the "screech-in". The "screech-in" is an optional ceremony performed on non-Newfoundlanders (known to Newfoundlanders as a "come from away" or "mainlander") involving a shot of screech, a short recitation and the kissing of a cod. It is often performed either in homes or more commonly in town pubs, such as George Street, St. John's. Notable for their screech-in traditions would be Trapper John's[2] and Christian's Bar.[3] Screech-ins also take place aboard tourist boat excursions such as the Scademia, which adds to the ceremony a sail through The Narrows into St. John's harbor.[citation needed]

The general process of a screech-in varies from pub to pub and community to community, though it often begins with the leader of the ceremony introducing themselves and asking those present if they'd like to become a Newfoundlander. The proper response would be a hearty "Yes b'y!" Each participant is asked to introduce themselves and where they come from, often interrupted by commentary by the ceremony leader, jokingly poking fun at their accent or hometown. Each holding their shot of Screech, they are then asked "Are ye a screecher?" or "Is you a Newfoundlander?," and are taught the proper response: "Indeed I is, me ol' cock! And long may yer big jib draw!" Translated, it means "Yes I am, my old friend, and may your sails always catch wind."[citation needed]

A cod fish – or any other fish unsightly enough to suitably replace the cod – is then held up to lip-level of each participant, who then bestows the fish with a kiss. Frozen fish are used most commonly in the screech-ins which take place on George St., though occasionally a fresher specimen, if available, will be used. Some pubs will also award certificates to those who have become an honorary Newfie once the screech-in is complete.[citation needed]

Some screech-in traditions vary in both the order of events as well as the necessary requirements. Some ceremonies require that the screech-ee eat a piece of "Newfie steak" (a slice of baloney) or kiss a rubber puffin's rear end. Some are also asked to stand in a bucket of salt water throughout the ceremony or that they wear the Sou'wester during the recitation and the drinking of the shot. For group screech-ins, the shots and recitations are generally all done at once. In all cases, only a native Newfoundlander can officiate a "proper" screech-in.[citation needed]

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2 hours ago, Shelby said:

I feel like it's pirate talk.

 

She's got an eye patch and a big sword and she's on a boat with cannons I bet.

 

1 hour ago, FauxPas said:

Or screech?  😁

 

53 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

Headed to Newfoundland?  

 

46 minutes ago, Shelby said:

There are pirates there? 

 

33 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

Used to be lots.  A few books on the matter on Amazon.

😳 We were right.

 

😂

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If I recall correctly, they have been before

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6 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

If I recall correctly, they have been before

 

Indeed they have. Here are her two previous blogs about it:

 

A good scoff, cod tongues, toutons and tea on The Rock aka Newfoundland (2016)

 

Newfoundland Re-Visited (2018)

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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While I was looking to see if I could google "swarvin'" and come up with something other than "swerving" I ran across this gem of a blog entry from 2014:

 

Dawn Ponders: Newfoundland Speak 101

 

Nowt about "screech" though. I'm glad you explained it!

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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1 hour ago, Shelby said:

There are pirates there? 

One of the greatest of all, in fact, the "Pirate Admiral" Peter Easton.

 

He was handsome and well-connected, more or less born to be played onscreen by someone like Errol Flynn. On one occasion a French fleet trapped Easton and his vessels in Harbour Grace, but despite the wind being against him Easton succeeded in winning the engagement, capturing a few of the French ships and driving off the rest. He even blockaded Bristol, one of Britain's most important trading points, until he was bought off with a ransom.

 

In the end he bought a pardon, a title and a grand estate with his ill-gotten gains, married a noblewoman, and retired to a life of wealth and ease.

 

 

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Alan Hawco is a Newfoundlander, explaining some Newfoundland terms.  He had a show for a number of years called The Republic of Doyle.  We loved that show and were sad when it ended.


Edited by ElsieD Clarified the wording. (log)
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44 minutes ago, Smithy said:

While I was looking to see if I could google "swarvin'" and come up with something other than "swerving" I ran across this gem of a blog entry from 2014:

 

Dawn Ponders: Newfoundland Speak 101

 

Nowt about "screech" though. I'm glad you explained it!

 

There is also "Who knit 'ya" meaning who's your mother/parents.

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Love the east coast of Canada...haven't been to NFLD (closest was Nova Scotia) but have had many interactions with our newfie neighbours...some of the nicest folk you will ever meet.

 

Have a blast, the seafood will be phenomenal!

 

 

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Pirating about Newfoundland (or any other pirate-friendly lands) should include parrots. Please include pix should you encounter parrots.

 

Looking forward to the touristing and the food. Safe travels!

 

 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Good morning!

 

We are packed up and are leaving home at 8 for the airport.  Our flight is at 10:25 and we will be landing in Gander at 15 :43 after a short stop in Halifax, Nova Scotia.  There is a time difference of 1.5 hours.  I'm looking forward to our trip.  

 

@Darienne  Swarvin', another word for swervin' means to meander.  Another one of those odd words.

@kayb You can be sure that if I come across a parrot, I'll post a picture.

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10 hours ago, kayb said:

Pirating about Newfoundland (or any other pirate-friendly lands) should include parrots. Please include pix should you encounter parrots.

 

Looking forward to the touristing and the food. Safe travels!

 

 

 

Maybe not parrots … but PLENTY of puffins.  Breeding colony of about half a million in Witless Bay.

I want to go back so much!!

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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