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Margaret Pilgrim

Roast poultry porn

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Proposing a rather broad topic because quail and friends shouldn't feel excluded.    It occurs to me that poultry, usually chickens. provide us with such culinary joy, and we should dedicate some space to their infinite variety, if I'm allowed to steal a phrase. 

So, I show you mine.    As I suggested on another thread, a simple roast chicken provides me with caveman pleasure.    Plus leftovers.

 

What's your pleasure?

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2 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Proposing a rather broad topic because quail and friends shouldn't feel excluded.    It occurs to me that poultry, usually chickens. provide us with such culinary joy, and we should dedicate some space to their infinite variety, if I'm allowed to steal a phrase. 

So, I show you mine.    As I suggested on another thread, a simple roast chicken provides me with caveman pleasure.    Plus leftovers.

 

What's your pleasure?

 

Well my dinner tonight is a Dysonized poussin, though since Dyson is Dyson I guess should say "coquelet".

 

You haven't shown me yours, I won't show you mine.

 

 

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Capon.  We are big fans of capons and have them for our holiday dinners such as Christmas.

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Here's one, a Euro-style bird from my Asian butcher

664751744_ScreenShot2019-07-26at8_15_43AM.thumb.png.e8ffd0e8ef0b68f164a4d035af811149.png

 

Roasted one hour in a frying pan, modified Judy Rogers' method.

1483812486_ScreenShot2019-07-26at8_01_41AM.thumb.png.19dab6d97b4ea1d82891fd992d88b37b.png

 

Juicy white meat.    Served with mash, gravy and sauteed cucumber.

73149181_ScreenShot2019-07-26at8_16_06AM.thumb.png.6e108ab8d5822ebd567ff6004012aad7.png

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Posted (edited)

And its American cousin, a Dolly Parton bird,

568746517_ScreenShot2019-07-26at8_41_04AM.png.50191f63f467cd4384042eea22723e1e.png

 

Spit roasting in the fireplace

 

 

336790589_ScreenShot2019-07-26at8_41_32AM.png.4c6fac85a418862293a6ff00fd562182.png


Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)
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Roasting a bird is a two day process for me, since the farm birds I buy benefit from an overnight brine. I typically stuff the cavity with a couple of onion quarters and half a lemon, rub the skin with olive oil, salt and pepper liberally, and roast on steam bake in the CSO.

 

I also will occasionally make Italian roast chicken. I have no idea how authentic it is, but the recipe came from a first-generation Italian friend. One makes a stuffing with ground beef,  ricotta, and chopped spinach, seasoned with salt, pepper, thyme, oregano and basil. Stuff the cavity. Make any remaining stuffing into meatballs. Surround chicken with potatoes, carrots, onions and bell pepper if you like them (I don't, so I don't) and any meatballs. Drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle with salt, pepper. Roast until stuffing temp is at 165. I often do this breast side down so the drippings from stuffing keep the breast meat moist. 

 

Nice dinner party dish.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Posted (edited)

I don't really like chicken.  It has those little rubbery chewy bits in it.  However, when certain friends come, they often bring a grocery broiled bird.  The husband takes it apart.  And I'll eat my fair share.  

 

I'll cook chicken for soups and mafé (when I'm out of beef and pork) and this coming week I'll poach chicken breasts for a friend with Crohn's who is coming.  Otherwise....


Edited by Darienne (log)
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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I don't really have poultry porn from my own cooking (that I can find, anyway), here's a post to me having one of the tastiest chickens I've ever had... not roasted, but grilled...

 

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When I first saw this topic, I first thought of this book. Yes, it reads just like the book it is parodying. I bought it, great recipes, and lots of fun reading.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Fifty-Shades-Chicken-Parody-Cookbook/dp/0385345224/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2HJFV0SQASISM&keywords=fifty+shades+of+chicken+cookbook&qid=1564237902&s=gateway&sprefix=fifty+shades+of+ch%2Caps%2C156&sr=8-1

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I have decided to, at least temporarily, ignore the "roast" in the thread title as it seems unnecessarily restricting, and bring you this black beauty. You’d be mad to roast it; this is a boiler, ideal in soups and stocks and considered to have huge medicinal benefits here in Chinaland.

 

silkie.thumb.JPG.d2a70add072203a381ede73b3bb2d549.JPG

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39 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

I have decided to, at least temporarily, ignore the "roast" in the thread title as it seems unnecessarily restricting, and bring you this black beauty. You’d be mad to roast it; this is a boiler, ideal in soups and stocks and considered to have huge medicinal benefits here in Chinaland.

 

silkie.thumb.JPG.d2a70add072203a381ede73b3bb2d549.JPG

When they're alive, they make great pets! (supposedly)

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37 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

I have decided to, at least temporarily, ignore the "roast" in the thread title as it seems unnecessarily restricting, and bring you this black beauty. You’d be mad to roast it; this is a boiler, ideal in soups and stocks and considered to have huge medicinal benefits here in Chinaland.

 

silkie.thumb.JPG.d2a70add072203a381ede73b3bb2d549.JPG

Thank you for this black beauty.    I see these at my Clement Street market but have never known how they are best prepared.    And no one there speaks English.   How would one best cook them?   Crystal method doesn't sound right to me.

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Just now, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Thank you for this black beauty.    I see these at my Clement Street market but have never known how they are best prepared.    And no one there speaks English.   How would one best cook them?   Crystal method doesn't sound right to me.

Look for recipes for Silky chickens.... they're usually used for broths or stocks.. they need to be simmered a long time!

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Kenneth T, please know you have brought sunshine to this misty, foggy SF day!     Somehow I am projecting myself walking my Silkie on a leash around the block to the astonishment of my golden, border collie and poodle neighbors.

559248231_ScreenShot2019-07-27at8_31_00AM.png.ba4c1afb447f9d1d356c97deb67ce296.png

 

Am torn over choosing a color, since the black is so chic.

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5 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Look for recipes for Silky chickens

 

More often spelled "silkie".

Yes. Soups and broths.

 

Despite their black bones and flesh (the common Chinese name translates literally as 'black bone chicken'), the birds are white plumaged and I've heard they do indeed make good pets, but I'm not a pet person. More a dinner person.

 

836874444_whitechicken.thumb.JPG.6b35f994c65f86f5270e9f4cce34684b.JPG

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Posted (edited)
On 7/26/2019 at 8:55 AM, kayb said:

Roasting a bird is a two day process for me, since the farm birds I buy benefit from an overnight brine.

 

 

Following Judy Rogers, I stuff salt and thyme under the breast and thigh skin, then refrigerate overnight, sear stovetop then roast 50-60 min at 450F

 

1326451459_ScreenShot2019-07-29at8_31_33AM.thumb.png.528ec6e77efcc6a01702103c10a392df.png

 

489308507_ScreenShot2019-07-29at8_31_07AM.thumb.png.8dfadbde7ea4085205ab9f83d0b62978.png

 

Juicy, flavorful

201966864_ScreenShot2019-07-29at8_31_55AM.thumb.png.768b48a136a7a77ec7e667dc79a566f1.png


Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)
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Simple roast chicken is always a treat.   Like to add potatoes in the roasting pan to cook in the chicken fat.  Here a shot of a chicken from last Mother’s Day. 

8A04000E-D944-4E33-9E2B-173A862227E8.jpeg

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My standard method is Judy Rodger's Zuni Café Cookbook recipe as described by @Margaret Pilgrim above.  I usually let the salted bird sit in the fridge for 2 days if I can.  So good. 

 

I also like this Buttermilk-Marinated Roast Chicken from Samin Nosrat's Salt Fat, Acid Heat that gets an overnight chill in a salted buttermilk brine. The skin gets very dark but the meat is super moist.

IMG_0065.thumb.jpg.782f8db1440ca45ce0565b3f8a20e939.jpg

The recipe is available online here on the website from her TV show

 

 

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I just roasted a chicken on Saturday and forgot to take a picture....It's chicken salad now!

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