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Can I Freeze This Cream Sauce?

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I'm trying to make a Roasted Poblano and Black Bean Enchilada recipe and I don't know if the tomatillo cream sauce will be freezer-friendly.  
 
Basically I process the following ingredients in a food processor to make the cream sauce.  I plan on freezing the sauce in ice-cube trays for individual servings.  The sauce will then be thawed and spread on a baking dish and also used to top the enchiladas and cook in a 400 degree oven.
 
Thanks!
 
INGREDIENTS:
 
-26 ounces canned tomatillos, drained
-1 onion
-1/2 cup cilantro leaves
-1/3 cup vegetable broth
-1/4 cup heavy cream
-1 tbsp vegetable oil
-3 garlic cloves
-1 tbsp lime juice
-1 tsp sugar
-1 tsp salt

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Seeing it is heavy cream, I think you should be able to freeze it.  You may have to whip the sauce to bring it back together once thawed.

 

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The heavy cream may separate into little fatty buttery bits in the freezer but if you heat the sauce to melt the fat, the fat should mix back in. Trying to mix it back in while cold will likely only yield frustration.  Or just bake the enchiladas and don't worry about it, it'll be fine once hot.


Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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OK, the consensus seems to be that I can freeze the sauce, although I should heat it up and stir it first to un-break the sauce before throwing it in the oven.  FWIW, some freezer-friendly recipes I’ve seen have heavy cream as an ingredient, so that helps our case as well.

 

Thanks everyone!

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