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2 hours ago, rotuts said:

@Anna N

 

"  made its way across the border (and paid the price)☹️    "   =  ?

 

if you can say.

 I don’t know the price. These cheeses were a gift. I only know that there is 250% duty on them.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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1 hour ago, Duvel said:

I was also wondering about that ... they check your car and you need to pay “import” taxes (between provinces ?) ...

No.  Crossing an international border.  Without getting into the realm of politics there are very high duties on dairy products.  These came up from Buffalo, NY. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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9C713673-EAA0-45FD-9E17-83C38389C68B.thumb.jpeg.b18616636bc150b0730fca49222b6629.jpeg

 

2881B4DD-78F5-4F86-935A-4FD32A4BEC6B.thumb.jpeg.bc2da1b72dac8124dc84700cd7a3b3d8.jpeg

 

 Another gift that came across the border, this time duty-free.  A selection of premium soy sauces. If anyone is knowledgable about these, I would be happy to hear more.   I just received them yesterday still have not had an opportunity to taste them or to do any research on them.   I am hoping to incorporate them into something while we’re up here.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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17 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 

 

9C713673-EAA0-45FD-9E17-83C38389C68B.thumb.jpeg.b18616636bc150b0730fca49222b6629.jpeg

 

2881B4DD-78F5-4F86-935A-4FD32A4BEC6B.thumb.jpeg.bc2da1b72dac8124dc84700cd7a3b3d8.jpeg

 

 Another gift that came across the border, this time duty-free.  A selection of premium soy sauces. If anyone is knowledgable about these, I would be happy to hear more.   I just received them yesterday still had ve not had an opportunity to taste them or to do any research on them.   I am hoping to incorporate them into something while we’re up here. 

 

 

Left one: Shiro Shoyo (literally white soy sauce): less dark, higher salt content.

Middle one: fairly regular koikuchi, if not a bit fancy; from Shodo Island, Shikoku. 

Right one: Shibanuma premium soy sauce, Ibaraki prefecture. Koikuchi as well. I assume this is the most tasty one ...

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6 minutes ago, Duvel said:

Left one: Shiro Shoyo (literally white soy sauce): less dark, higher salt content.

Middle one: fairly regular koikuchi, if not a bit fancy; from Shodo Island, Shikoku. 

Right one: Shibanuma premium soy sauce, Ibaraki prefecture. Koikuchi as well. I assume this is the most tasty one ...

 Thank you so much. You are the best,

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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BE7F7205-9973-4C2F-88F5-9FB7B4A0E721.thumb.jpeg.98783eb007086623fa48f999e0ba4cec.jpeg

 

 Can you ever have enough groceries? And the rhubarb – – – Kerry only asked if there was anyway to get rhubarb and it miraculously appeared.   J, who knows everything and everybody,  was able to get some. There are four people on J’s street with rhubarb in their gardens. 

 

(More of the on-sale striploins, rib and shoulder pork chops, mushrooms and Dijon mustard.)

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Im wondering if pork is cut differently in Canada vs the USA

 

I can't quite decide what the lower package is :  some sort of 7-blade pork ?

 

is that one from the shoulder ?

 

and the one above it seems like a very large single cut of pork that I doubly Id see down here.

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2 hours ago, Anna N said:

No.  Crossing an international border.  Without getting into the realm of politics there are very high duties on dairy products.  These came up from Buffalo, NY. 

That sucks big time......

no political statements about tariffs here...…..

 

love the pork...wish John would eat it.

and rhubarb?!  I remember checking under the basket to see if there was enough to cut to stew ….

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by suzilightning (log)

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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3 minutes ago, suzilightning said:

That sucks big time......

no political statements about tariffs here...…..

 

It's not about those, at least not in the fashion they've been imposed on other products/countries.

 

It's more about differing approaches to the dairy market. Canada limits dairy production, which means our homegrown dairy industry provides an actual living to those who engage in it. The downside is that a) imported dairy products are sharply restricted, and b) costs for consumers are relatively high.

 

In the US, dairy is part of a large system of interlocking subsidies. Dairy farmers' cattle provide an outlet for some of the vast US overproduction of grain, which in turn leads to a huge surplus of dairy products (Google how much US cheese consumption has increased over the last four decades...go on, do it...). Much of the acrimony around the recent trade negotiations between Canada and the US revolved around the question of dairy, with the US seeking greater access to the Canadian market for some of its below-cost overproduction while the Canadian industry, for its part, argued that it would be the death of domestic production.

I don't think the scenario is quite as linear as the homegrown dairymen would like us to believe, but certainly there's a case to be made.

 

We also adhere to different standards up here. It's been a while since I've written about it (and therefore since I've researched the variance in our respective production criteria) but IIRC recombinant bovine growth hormone is permitted in the US but banned in Canada, and there are some differences in allowable husbandry practices as well. Not necessarily better/worse, you understand, but different.

 

It's a complicated topic, which (like so many others) tends to get shortened down to opinions that can be expressed in a tweet (or perhaps a bumper sticker).

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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35 minutes ago, chromedome said:

It's a complicated topic,

Yup. Hence I avoided it. 😂   I’d rather celebrate the joys of island life.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

Im wondering if pork is cut differently in Canada vs the USA

 

I can't quite decide what the lower package is :  some sort of 7-blade pork ?

 

is that one from the shoulder ?

 

and the one above it seems like a very large single cut of pork that I doubly Id see down here.

The lower one is pork shoulder and the upper one is labelled boneless pork sirloin.   Not being a butcher I can’t be any more helpful.

 

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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The "7-bone" is often sold up here as a pork "shoulder steak." Not as tender as the sirloin but fattier, and both are good when grilled. I'd lean toward the sirloin if I was doing a stir-fry or something like that.

 

Bear in mind that pork is usually the "cheap meat" up here, the way chicken is Stateside, so that's probably why these are cuts you don't see much south of the border.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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@chromedome

 

thank you

 

wow  you might figure out how to find

 

Pork Blade Roasts !

 

on the 7  ( beefy ) :

 

BC26M.jpg.68882a1f3ff45ccf3a508e29078100f9.jpg

 

y9u see the '7 " which is the bone on the top

 

just to the R of the is  the Blade Steak

 

as tasty as anytng.  on deal w the membrane you see in its middle

 

but

 

N of the B

 

can one find  pork  " blade roasts "

 

wow

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They're not uncommon, at least not in my neck of the woods. You'll see those as well as whole and half shoulders (whole are relatively rare, and tend to crop up as occasional specials). I have one in my freezer at the moment, in fact, which will probably go for chili verde some day soon.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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On 6/29/2019 at 12:49 PM, suzilightning said:

Please note the box.....

 

C47CD494-51DC-4510-8EB8-540A7CBEB6D5.thumb.jpeg.7226d58f4de608e5e93b03dbeb732ecd.jpeg

 

I actually got a few baskets of Hammonton blueberries this week - first (for me) of the season - they're the best.

 

On 6/29/2019 at 1:41 PM, Anna N said:

Yep. Tonic water with quinine.  Whether it actually works or whether it is only in my head, I find I have fewer night time leg cramps if I have a drink of tonic water on a daily basis (even fewer if I add enough gin to the tonic water). Probably more psychological than anything (or perhaps just better hydration) but I say if it works for you go for it.  My sister swears by a bar of soap in her bed as a “cure” for leg cramps. If you believe it works and you believe you have fewer cramps as a result....   so long as these remedies are not harmful I don’t see any reason to change. 

 

Jane Brody's NY Times' article a few weeks ago (I, too, unfortunately suffer occasional leg cramps - they suck!):

 

Getting a Good Night’s Sleep Without Drugs

 

Quote

 

More recently, my middle-of-the-night leg cramps have been nearly entirely eliminated by consuming eight ounces of quinine-containing tonic water (actually, diet tonic) every night before bed.

If you can’t handle that amount of liquid close to bedtime, drink it earlier in the evening or perhaps try an herbal remedy that I use when traveling: Hyland’s Leg Cramps, which contains quinine as one of its active ingredients.

 

 

 

 

Edited by weinoo (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

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39 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Thanks, Anna.  I held out and didn't go to the ER last night but I saw the doctor in the morning.  More pills.

 Glad you are OK.   Sorry about the additional pills. I rattle when I walk because I take that many. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Thanks, Anna.  I held out and didn't go to the ER last night but I saw the doctor in the morning.  More pills.

 

Hope you feel better Jo.

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Forgot to post my baking - Paul Young’s brownies with a sprinkling of maple sugar.

 

D40B0476-CAF5-4FBD-B4AD-85310A157409.thumb.jpeg.853cdc4568d53f63fbfd49538ec997c4.jpeg

 

 

The child got a bedazzled Canada day hat!

 

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Later by the pool - she shared her popsicle with the dog.

 

B3A60C2C-73EB-4E86-8A01-84B3280B03CC.thumb.jpeg.659084a7256e7c120067d0d480a557a4.jpeg

 

 

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