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Anna N

Manitoulin — Life on the level

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On the topic of Sauerkraut  - while Bubbies is ok...if you want the real McCoy...check out, Costco of all places!

 

A recent find (a few months back) led me to - 'Wildbrine - Raw Organic'

 

It is fantastic, unpasteurized, full flavoured stuff.  As good as I have had from the local Mennonites who make it. 

 

Super healthy too.

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Posted (edited)

A head of cabbage, a jar, some kosher salt and water and a couple weeks, maybe try to make some homemade?   Not exactly on-demand eating, but the end product might be stellar.


Edited by lemniscate (log)

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56 minutes ago, TicTac said:

On the topic of Sauerkraut  - while Bubbies is ok...if you want the real McCoy...check out, Costco of all places!

 

A recent find (a few months back) led me to - 'Wildbrine - Raw Organic'

 

It is fantastic, unpasteurized, full flavoured stuff.  As good as I have had from the local Mennonites who make it. 

 

Super healthy too.

I tried that a few weeks ago, when they were handing out samples. Tasted very much like my homemade.


"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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5 hours ago, lemniscate said:

A head of cabbage, a jar, some kosher salt and water and a couple weeks, maybe try to make some homemade?   Not exactly on-demand eating, but the end product might be stellar.

 

I tried making some recently, came out very salty.  This stuff is reasonable and extremely good.

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 I have tried making sauerkraut on a number of occasions without a great deal of success. I am also one of those people who is just anal about food safety and never trust my own instincts.   Best I should just buy it.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Posted (edited)

On offer at the Other Half Cafe today was the Philly Cheesesteak on fry bread. By the time my student and I got there it was just frybread.  5D8668DA-9020-4650-B5BC-151F70FEE9EB.thumb.jpeg.d27be0569e954d42ccc42598b517d2bc.jpeg

 

But on the way home we did find a place that had an Indian taco which was what she wanted in the first place.

 

BE2EDE86-F862-4D17-8C92-F6127F75D68C.thumb.jpeg.27bcd3d8986263b8d91581e82706b747.jpeg

 

But on the way home we did find a place that had an Indian taco which was what she wanted in the first place.

 

 

 

B4770319-1527-4C5F-803A-58C7B57EE182.thumb.jpeg.bef66242d4c061d1f952e45e99db87e2.jpeg

 

 their menu 

 

 


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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So I came home early from Wiki cause there wasn't that much to do at the nursing home. This gave Anna and I an opportunity to run out to Barney's Bargain Barn where you really never know what you are going to find

 

IMG_5949.thumb.jpg.1bd0b0b3cc3a547ca0ecdf3bb78f8f9c.jpg

 

IMG_5951.thumb.jpg.98f52b52685ed90fbc434cb975a317f6.jpg

 

Weighed the bags of nut flours when I got home - they were between 1500 and 1800 grams each - sent a text to @Alleguede - ran back to buy the rest. Not entirely true - I left them about 3 of the almond flour. When I reached 30 bags I decided to stop.

 

IMG_5953.thumb.jpg.2c6c63b53fa8fef18c04f2c1906825ec.jpg

 

IMG_5954.thumb.jpg.1d85d18c11b5347ab914069621d69933.jpg

 

So pistachio, almond and hazelnut flour for ∼ $7.50/kg. And that's Canadian dollars.

 

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before I saw it

 

I wondered what an Indian Taco was

 

after seeing it

 

Im still wondering

 

Indian of the America's ?

 

or Indian of the SE Asia

 

depending where you are starting from

 

 

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35 minutes ago, rotuts said:

before I saw it

 

I wondered what an Indian Taco was

 

after seeing it

 

Im still wondering

 

Indian of the America's ?

 

or Indian of the SE Asia

 

depending where you are starting from

 

 

Fry bread, chili, cheese, taco fixins.

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4 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Fry bread, chili, cheese, taco fixins.

 

I was going to ask the same question as @rotuts and after reading @Kerry Beal's answer I am still wondering.

 

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That price for a Taco seems high or is it just me? 

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8 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I was going to ask the same question as @rotuts and after reading @Kerry Beal's answer I am still wondering.

 

First Nations.

Wiikwemkoong Reserve is on Manitoulin. Fry bread is the same as bannock I think. I have been wrong a lot lately so take it for what it's worth!

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3 minutes ago, demiglace said:

First Nations.

Wiikwemkoong Reserve is on Manitoulin. Fry bread is the same as bannock I think. I have been wrong a lot lately so take it for what it's worth!

 

I've been served bannock bread by First Nations people near Moose Factory, Ontario.  It was a freshly baked sweet bread with raisins, accompanied by surprisingly good tea.  Reminded me of something similar from Scotland.

 

 

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28 minutes ago, MetsFan5 said:

That price for a Taco seems high or is it just me? 

 

Canadian.  Not real dollars.

 

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We used to get frybread or fry bread in New Mexico when we went to the pueblos for various events or at concession stands at fairs. It was often called Navajo bread.It wasn't topped with anything in my memory. It has a long and twisted history. Here's one source:

 

https://www.cowboysindians.com/2013/10/more-than-an-indian-taco-2/

 

Fry bread is a simple wheat bread that is deep fried. I don't know how the term "Indian taco" originated; At least during my time in NM--the late sixties and early seventies-- it wasn't something we saw on menus. Tacos of course are typically made with corn tortillas, so I believe the intention was to use fry bread as a base for Americanized taco fillings such as beans, ground beef and grated cheese. It would be impossible to fold such a construction the way you fold a taco. Flour tortillas are usually made with white flour, so the ingredients may for them may indeed be closer to the ingredients of flour tortillas, but cooked in a completely different way.

 

How fry bread migrated into NM and Arizona is a long story itself, but how it migrated into eastern Canada must be an even longer one. How it became associated with or called bannock must be another strange tale, as bannock is a Scottish oat cake. There's a wealth of online analysis about the history of Indian fry bread and its travels.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

We used to get frybread or fry bread in New Mexico when we went to the pueblos for various events or at concession stands at fairs. It was often called Navajo bread.It wasn't topped with anything in my memory. It has a long and twisted history. Here's one source:

 

https://www.cowboysindians.com/2013/10/more-than-an-indian-taco-2/

 

Fry bread is a simple wheat bread that is deep fried. I don't know how the term "Indian taco" originated; At least during my time in NM--the late sixties and early seventies-- it wasn't something we saw on menus. Tacos of course are typically made with corn tortillas, so I believe the intention was to use fry bread as a base for Americanized taco fillings such as beans, ground beef and grated cheese. It would be impossible to fold such a construction the way you fold a taco. Flour tortillas are usually made with white flour, so the ingredients may for them may indeed be closer to the ingredients of flour tortillas, but cooked in a completely different way.

 

How fry bread migrated into NM and Arizona is a long story itself, but how it migrated into eastern Canada must be an even longer one. How it became associated with or called bannock must be another strange tale, as bannock is a Scottish oat cake. There's a wealth of online analysis about the history of Indian fry bread and its travels.

 

In the mid 1800's thousands of Scots came to British Columbia to help build the colony. I believe a lot of them married Indians. That's how bannock got to the  West Coast of Canada. It's known as a First Nations bread often served with salmon. Any corrections gratefully accepted.


Edited by demiglace changed one thing (log)
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3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I've been served bannock bread by First Nations people near Moose Factory, Ontario.  It was a freshly baked sweet bread with raisins, accompanied by surprisingly good tea.  Reminded me of something similar from Scotland.

 

 

It came from Scotland. I've never had it sweet before. Sounds good.

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Not sure I have ever seen Pistachio flour (and organic, at that!)....very intrigued, I absolutely love pistachios...

 

 

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 Good morning. The sun hasn’t shown his face yet and from the puddles I see all around I am guessing it rained overnight. Seems a little cooler today which I am thankful for.

 

182D6332-0D60-45D2-A71D-00CA5012E63A.thumb.jpeg.ffe67949715eba7b1ca1c035ef0b6d5b.jpeg

 

I usually shun anything sweet for breakfast but the Sicilian lemon marmalade I found at HomeSense was calling out to me today. It is quite delightful. Makes me wish I could get hold of the lemons themselves.

 

 I had a very odd thought as I went to sleep last night. At the bargain place yesterday I bought some espresso-flavoured Kit Kat bars and I wondered if one could melt these over a piece of toast. It was my idea of a riff on the French pain au chocolat.  Quite obviously my brain was somewhat disordered since it would be very hard to melt anything but the thin layer of chocolate on the bar.  Still think I might be onto something — I’m just not sure what it is.  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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 So I wanted to talk some more about Sicilian lemon marmalade. Although this was a serendipitous find in HomeSense I would not have purchased it had it not already been on my mind. Sometime during the last month I ran across a recipe that called specifically for Sicilian lemon marmalade. I dismissed it thinking that there was not a hope in hell I would ever find Sicilian lemon marmalade. Now of course I can’t find the recipe. I’ve tried Eat Your Books, Google (of course), any digital books I have purchased recently, any sites I remember visiting.  Nothing. This happens to me two or three times a year where I come across a recipe,  don’t make a note of where I found it, and then want to look it up afterwards. I’m betting I am not alone.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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