Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Anna N

Manitoulin — Life on the level

Recommended Posts

On the topic of Sauerkraut  - while Bubbies is ok...if you want the real McCoy...check out, Costco of all places!

 

A recent find (a few months back) led me to - 'Wildbrine - Raw Organic'

 

It is fantastic, unpasteurized, full flavoured stuff.  As good as I have had from the local Mennonites who make it. 

 

Super healthy too.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A head of cabbage, a jar, some kosher salt and water and a couple weeks, maybe try to make some homemade?   Not exactly on-demand eating, but the end product might be stellar.


Edited by lemniscate (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, TicTac said:

On the topic of Sauerkraut  - while Bubbies is ok...if you want the real McCoy...check out, Costco of all places!

 

A recent find (a few months back) led me to - 'Wildbrine - Raw Organic'

 

It is fantastic, unpasteurized, full flavoured stuff.  As good as I have had from the local Mennonites who make it. 

 

Super healthy too.

I tried that a few weeks ago, when they were handing out samples. Tasted very much like my homemade.


“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, lemniscate said:

A head of cabbage, a jar, some kosher salt and water and a couple weeks, maybe try to make some homemade?   Not exactly on-demand eating, but the end product might be stellar.

 

I tried making some recently, came out very salty.  This stuff is reasonable and extremely good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I have tried making sauerkraut on a number of occasions without a great deal of success. I am also one of those people who is just anal about food safety and never trust my own instincts.   Best I should just buy it.

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On offer at the Other Half Cafe today was the Philly Cheesesteak on fry bread. By the time my student and I got there it was just frybread.  5D8668DA-9020-4650-B5BC-151F70FEE9EB.thumb.jpeg.d27be0569e954d42ccc42598b517d2bc.jpeg

 

But on the way home we did find a place that had an Indian taco which was what she wanted in the first place.

 

BE2EDE86-F862-4D17-8C92-F6127F75D68C.thumb.jpeg.27bcd3d8986263b8d91581e82706b747.jpeg

 

But on the way home we did find a place that had an Indian taco which was what she wanted in the first place.

 

 

 

B4770319-1527-4C5F-803A-58C7B57EE182.thumb.jpeg.bef66242d4c061d1f952e45e99db87e2.jpeg

 

 their menu 

 

 


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I came home early from Wiki cause there wasn't that much to do at the nursing home. This gave Anna and I an opportunity to run out to Barney's Bargain Barn where you really never know what you are going to find

 

IMG_5949.thumb.jpg.1bd0b0b3cc3a547ca0ecdf3bb78f8f9c.jpg

 

IMG_5951.thumb.jpg.98f52b52685ed90fbc434cb975a317f6.jpg

 

Weighed the bags of nut flours when I got home - they were between 1500 and 1800 grams each - sent a text to @Alleguede - ran back to buy the rest. Not entirely true - I left them about 3 of the almond flour. When I reached 30 bags I decided to stop.

 

IMG_5953.thumb.jpg.2c6c63b53fa8fef18c04f2c1906825ec.jpg

 

IMG_5954.thumb.jpg.1d85d18c11b5347ab914069621d69933.jpg

 

So pistachio, almond and hazelnut flour for ∼ $7.50/kg. And that's Canadian dollars.

 

  • Like 14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

before I saw it

 

I wondered what an Indian Taco was

 

after seeing it

 

Im still wondering

 

Indian of the America's ?

 

or Indian of the SE Asia

 

depending where you are starting from

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, rotuts said:

before I saw it

 

I wondered what an Indian Taco was

 

after seeing it

 

Im still wondering

 

Indian of the America's ?

 

or Indian of the SE Asia

 

depending where you are starting from

 

 

Fry bread, chili, cheese, taco fixins.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I was going to ask the same question as @rotuts and after reading @Kerry Beal's answer I am still wondering.

 

First Nations.

Wiikwemkoong Reserve is on Manitoulin. Fry bread is the same as bannock I think. I have been wrong a lot lately so take it for what it's worth!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, demiglace said:

First Nations.

Wiikwemkoong Reserve is on Manitoulin. Fry bread is the same as bannock I think. I have been wrong a lot lately so take it for what it's worth!

 

I've been served bannock bread by First Nations people near Moose Factory, Ontario.  It was a freshly baked sweet bread with raisins, accompanied by surprisingly good tea.  Reminded me of something similar from Scotland.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, MetsFan5 said:

That price for a Taco seems high or is it just me? 

 

Canadian.  Not real dollars.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We used to get frybread or fry bread in New Mexico when we went to the pueblos for various events or at concession stands at fairs. It was often called Navajo bread.It wasn't topped with anything in my memory. It has a long and twisted history. Here's one source:

 

https://www.cowboysindians.com/2013/10/more-than-an-indian-taco-2/

 

Fry bread is a simple wheat bread that is deep fried. I don't know how the term "Indian taco" originated; At least during my time in NM--the late sixties and early seventies-- it wasn't something we saw on menus. Tacos of course are typically made with corn tortillas, so I believe the intention was to use fry bread as a base for Americanized taco fillings such as beans, ground beef and grated cheese. It would be impossible to fold such a construction the way you fold a taco. Flour tortillas are usually made with white flour, so the ingredients may for them may indeed be closer to the ingredients of flour tortillas, but cooked in a completely different way.

 

How fry bread migrated into NM and Arizona is a long story itself, but how it migrated into eastern Canada must be an even longer one. How it became associated with or called bannock must be another strange tale, as bannock is a Scottish oat cake. There's a wealth of online analysis about the history of Indian fry bread and its travels.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

We used to get frybread or fry bread in New Mexico when we went to the pueblos for various events or at concession stands at fairs. It was often called Navajo bread.It wasn't topped with anything in my memory. It has a long and twisted history. Here's one source:

 

https://www.cowboysindians.com/2013/10/more-than-an-indian-taco-2/

 

Fry bread is a simple wheat bread that is deep fried. I don't know how the term "Indian taco" originated; At least during my time in NM--the late sixties and early seventies-- it wasn't something we saw on menus. Tacos of course are typically made with corn tortillas, so I believe the intention was to use fry bread as a base for Americanized taco fillings such as beans, ground beef and grated cheese. It would be impossible to fold such a construction the way you fold a taco. Flour tortillas are usually made with white flour, so the ingredients may for them may indeed be closer to the ingredients of flour tortillas, but cooked in a completely different way.

 

How fry bread migrated into NM and Arizona is a long story itself, but how it migrated into eastern Canada must be an even longer one. How it became associated with or called bannock must be another strange tale, as bannock is a Scottish oat cake. There's a wealth of online analysis about the history of Indian fry bread and its travels.

 

In the mid 1800's thousands of Scots came to British Columbia to help build the colony. I believe a lot of them married Indians. That's how bannock got to the  West Coast of Canada. It's known as a First Nations bread often served with salmon. Any corrections gratefully accepted.


Edited by demiglace changed one thing (log)
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I've been served bannock bread by First Nations people near Moose Factory, Ontario.  It was a freshly baked sweet bread with raisins, accompanied by surprisingly good tea.  Reminded me of something similar from Scotland.

 

 

It came from Scotland. I've never had it sweet before. Sounds good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure I have ever seen Pistachio flour (and organic, at that!)....very intrigued, I absolutely love pistachios...

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Good morning. The sun hasn’t shown his face yet and from the puddles I see all around I am guessing it rained overnight. Seems a little cooler today which I am thankful for.

 

182D6332-0D60-45D2-A71D-00CA5012E63A.thumb.jpeg.ffe67949715eba7b1ca1c035ef0b6d5b.jpeg

 

I usually shun anything sweet for breakfast but the Sicilian lemon marmalade I found at HomeSense was calling out to me today. It is quite delightful. Makes me wish I could get hold of the lemons themselves.

 

 I had a very odd thought as I went to sleep last night. At the bargain place yesterday I bought some espresso-flavoured Kit Kat bars and I wondered if one could melt these over a piece of toast. It was my idea of a riff on the French pain au chocolat.  Quite obviously my brain was somewhat disordered since it would be very hard to melt anything but the thin layer of chocolate on the bar.  Still think I might be onto something — I’m just not sure what it is.  

  • Like 10

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 So I wanted to talk some more about Sicilian lemon marmalade. Although this was a serendipitous find in HomeSense I would not have purchased it had it not already been on my mind. Sometime during the last month I ran across a recipe that called specifically for Sicilian lemon marmalade. I dismissed it thinking that there was not a hope in hell I would ever find Sicilian lemon marmalade. Now of course I can’t find the recipe. I’ve tried Eat Your Books, Google (of course), any digital books I have purchased recently, any sites I remember visiting.  Nothing. This happens to me two or three times a year where I come across a recipe,  don’t make a note of where I found it, and then want to look it up afterwards. I’m betting I am not alone.

  • Like 6
  • Haha 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By Foodiversal
      Hi everybody! I'm Jake, I'm 26 and from the United Kingdom. I've recently left a career in science teaching and I really hope to pursue my true passion, food writing by becoming either a recipe developer, a food journalist, or both! I've launched my website today so thought it was a good time to get active in some online forums and say hello! I look forward to meeting and interacting with you all ❤️ 
    • By Panaderia Canadiense
      Hello again from south of the equator!  As you may or may not have heard (because the international news media isn't really giving the situation much coverage), Ecuador is in the grip of a major social protest movement.  This started on October 1, when fuel subsidies in the country were abruptly struck causing the prices of gasoline and diesel to more than double overnight.  Transport and heavy haulage unions immediately went on strike, and blocked the main roads of the cities with their vehicles in protest.  The indigenous movements of the central Sierra, beginning in my province, Tungurahua, joined the strike on October 2, and the President quickly declared a State of Emergency that restricts movement, freedom of the press, and freedom association.  The indigenous took over the road blockades on October 3, cutting the cities off from the world; Ambato became an island overnight.
       
      It is now October 8, one week into the blockades.  Shortages in the fresh markets and supermarkets began on Sunday, as people realized that we were in for a long-haul of protest and possibly an overthrow of the sitting government.  Ecuador's indigenous have a long history of deposing governments in this way, and it's not a fast process.
       
      I'll be blogging informally throughout the National Strike, to document how the inevitable food shortages affect the city and my own table. 
       
      These first pictures are from Sunday, October 6.  In the Mercado Mayorista, a place I've always taken you along to when I've blogged from Ambato, the cement floors of the naves are visible in places where they have never, in my experience, been exposed.  The fresh corn nave is all but abandoned - this is because all of the corn in the city's stock has been sold.  I'll remind you: a nave in this market is about a thousand square metres of space.  This is also missing the big trucks that come to trade fresh grains in the parking lot, because they couldn't make it through the roadblocks.  Most of the Mayorista is in the same situation - stocks are selling off fast.

       
      The supermarkets are even more dire.  The meat coolers are completely empty, and the produce shelves are diminishing quickly.



       
    • By Kerry Beal
      @Alleguede and I are in the lounge at Pearson awaiting our flight to Vegas for the IBIE (International Baking Industry Exhibition).
       
      I got the usually bomb sniffing swab done on my electronics - @Alleguede got the 3rd degree at customs. Anyone know what a carnet is? I believe I got that lecture the last time.
       

       
      Made myself a little cocktail, Maker's Mark, Grand Marnier, vintage port. I've had better! 
       

       
      Not a lot of choices to eat since it's rather late (not that earlier would have helped) - they also have pasta salad, Italian Wedding soup, Cream of mushroom soup, corn chips and salsa. There appear to be some cookies there as well. I'm trying to low carb as much as possible so I'm avoiding most of it.
       

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
    • By ElsieD
      Host's note: the initial title of this thread was "Swarvin' in ???"  as a teaser.  Once the destination was identified as Newfoundland, the title was changed to reflect this.  The initial comments were based on the ??? In the title.
       
       
      And we'll soon be off.......culinary adventures to follow.

    • By ElsieD
      Some of you may recall that in 2016 I had a blog about our trip to Newfoundland.  We are going there again tomorrow for a week, returning July 1 and I thought that since we are going to, and eating at, places different from that year, I would do another blog.  When I booked our flights and accommodations (7 places in 8 nights) last February, June 23rd seemed like a long ways away.  Yet here we are, about to leave.   I hope some of you will follow along as we travel through the province.    
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...