Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Anna N

Manitoulin — Life on the level

Recommended Posts

So this afternoon I had a 'student'. He and his partner bought Georgian Chocolates from it's owner and moved it up the road a piece into slightly larger digs. Catherine had been running it in a tiny closet sized room inside a gluten free bakery in Barrie. 

 

He has been using the EZtemper and recently started having trouble tempering. My suspicion was the issue was thermometer related and today's lesson proved that. He left here with a thermometer considerably more accurate than the one he had been using.

 

IMG_5896.thumb.jpg.07a058b3585586bd90a9383f7b9912d2.jpg

 

IMG_5898.thumb.jpg.ee847a8e8cf59d40691854c788a7bb16.jpg

 

He's got excellent folding technique - apparently his partner can wrap him under the table!

  • Like 12
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Anna just reminded me that I have been lax in my posting duties today as I sit around and wait for a student to come from Orillia.

 

IMG_5890.thumb.jpg.535e1d7365ca76686244edf6ca633dd6.jpg

 

Cut up the remaining berries - not a single one moldy. Smell amazing.

 

IMG_5891.thumb.jpg.ce8ed600354fda5aabea3a47e347b449.jpg

 

My lunch - the dreaded MW laced bacon, cheese and tomato sandwich.

 

IMG_5894.thumb.jpg.ee82869abb937306673cc9ed5b018f6b.jpg

 

The start of experiment 2 - Kenji's fries. You shouldn't try to put a kind of softish potato in the cutter - it gets kind of bendy and hard to push through. These have been cooked for about 10 minutes in salted and vinegar laced water. 

 

 

 

Ontario grows really nice strawberries. Much better than some other provinces. I don't know if it's the combination of humidity and heat or what but the summers I hung down there I couldn't get enough. You had me dreaming about fries the other night, I woke up with a start thinking I had over cooked them. Fries fries fries fries. Does poutine play a roll anytime soon?

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He and his delightful daughter were about half a mile up the road before we made our Intro to Aperol.

 

IMG_5900.thumb.jpg.d6a86e54c5f349058d517f6b172c92d5.jpg

 

IMG_5902.thumb.jpg.92b2d576778883a761e988081dba9671.jpg

 

Lit the BBQ and took the Control Freak outside.

 

IMG_5906.thumb.jpg.4bc117a1d367a5eb5091fdf061378b8c.jpg

 

IMG_5907.thumb.jpg.205b1ccd252e731d274d06330968d37d.jpg

 

Blanched for 50 seconds at 200º C. Popped into the fridge for a few minutes then recooked at 200º C for about 4 minutes.

 

IMG_5914.thumb.jpg.295521003cb2c3037f545578023f2eaa.jpg

 

IMG_5917.thumb.jpg.b560bc4607ac6f7ba82892c980151a9a.jpg

 

IMG_5918.thumb.jpg.8f4bb71dcca577189221219e4d77d688.jpg

 

 

  • Like 10
  • Delicious 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, demiglace said:

 

Ontario grows really nice strawberries. Much better than some other provinces. I don't know if it's the combination of humidity and heat or what but the summers I hung down there I couldn't get enough. You had me dreaming about fries the other night, I woke up with a start thinking I had over cooked them. Fries fries fries fries. Does poutine play a roll anytime soon?

Before poutine can play a part we need the other blade for the cutter - poutine fries are much fatter. I'm hoping it will show up early this week. 

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Before poutine can play a part we need the other blade for the cutter - poutine fries are much fatter. I'm hoping it will show up early this week. 

yay, can't wait!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the above dinner looks deliciously 

 

probably has some Miracle-ish in it

 

butIm hopefull  the fries and steak made up for this.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/6/2019 at 9:26 PM, Kerry Beal said:

 

 

Giving new meaning to organ donation. Have you signed your card?

WHERE is the "Groan" emoji?

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Anna N said:

It does indeed make an interesting read and I have no regrets buying it but, as I suspected, I will not be cooking from it.

so it is a reading cookbook NOT a cooking cookbook

 

  • Like 2

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, suzilightning said:

so it is a reading cookbook NOT a cooking cookbook

 

 

That was my take on it, based on this review. Excerpt:

Quote

Whether you find a lack of actual utility off-putting or not, the narrative telling of recipes does serve a purpose: you are forced to read each in its entirety to understand what's going on. This is a cookbook designed to be read cover-to-cover, not one to be skimmed and dog-eared for recipes to come back and recreate. It's a narrative of the life of the restaurant in the same way Patterson says he aims to make his tasting menus into a narrative, with each dish leading into the next.

 

  • Like 2

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Anna N said:

It does indeed make an interesting read and I have no regrets buying it but, as I suspected, I will not be cooking from it. 

 

Those books by top restaurants are not intended to be recipe books, but story books: their aim is to document what's happening in that restaurant. Many of them fail at it, some of them are excellent like this one. Personally I would put this book in the top 5 restaurant books I own.

I strongly suggest his book "The Art of Flavor: Practices and Principles for Creating Delicious Food" (kindle version is currently sold for US$5.99 at Amazon.com, the audiobook is free with audible trial on Amazon.ca), written with the perfumer Mandy Aftel. It talks about the use of aromas in food, the intersection between cookery and perfumery. Highly informative and pretty unique in its content.

 

 

 

Teo

 

  • Like 2

Teo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Smithy said:

That was my take on it, based on this review. 

It is a decidedly “cheffy” book given that some of the ingredients are beyond the reach of many of us either because of cost or availability.  And cooking vegetables in actual sea water is a deal breaker unless you live on an ocean coastline. Even then you need a boat to get out far from shore to gather that less polluted sea water. 

 

But I knew perfectly well when I bought it that it was not a practical recipe book.

 

He is the second chef I know of (there must be more) who debunks the idea that all blanched vegetables should be shocked in an ice bath. I just find that an interesting take on a “well known fact”.  

 

There is more than a little Thomas Keller perfectionism in Daniel Patterson which extends even to the napkins used to clean any spills on plates before service. I like that even though such perfectionism is out of reach of ordinary mortals. 

 

 No regrets whatever about purchasing the book.

  • Like 5

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, weinoo said:

Does he know?

 Sooner or later I knew somebody would twig on to this.😂

  • Like 3
  • Haha 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Anna N said:

He is the second chef I know of (there must be more) who debunks the idea that all blanched vegetables should be shocked in an ice bath. I just find that an interesting take on a “well known fact”.

 

I didn't know this had been debunked, although I'm generally too lazy (and frugal with the ice, depending on my circumstances) to take that step. What does he say about it? What has been your experience?


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

I didn't know this had been debunked, although I'm generally too lazy (and frugal with the ice, depending on my circumstances) to take that step. What does he say about it? What has been your experience?

 

Apparently it's in the Modernist Cuisine books.  First I've heard of it too as far as not ice-bathing.

 

However, during my inquiry I found what I think is an even more "180 degree out thinking" process, heat blanching fresh veg and fruit to extend storage.   Heat Blanching.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

I didn't know this had been debunked, although I'm generally too lazy (and frugal with the ice, depending on my circumstances) to take that step. What does he say about it? What has been your experience?

 I wouldn’t say it has been debunked totally. Samin Nosrat was the first chef I came across who suggested that just spreading out the blanched vegetables on a sheet pan worked equally wellp.  Daniel Patterson says, “Except for a few leafy greens in a noted few circumstances, don’t cool anything by plunging it into ice water, cool by spreading out on a plate or a sheet tray. Yes, do this even with asparagus, which will stay vibrant green, contrary to popular belief.“

 

He then goes on to explain about what happens to cell walls when vegetables are heated and then plunged into ice water. He claims this tends to make them slimy as they absorb the ice water into the cells.  He goes on to say, “When allowed to cool at room temperature, the residual heat on the outside of the vegetable evaporates the excess water, and they cool down drier and not slimy.”  

 

 I started using the sheet tray method after reading Nosrat’s book. 

 

As to when to use this method  I think depends very much on time available and what you intend to do with the vegetables afterwards. 

 

 My experience, like yours, extends only to being less of a nuisance than having to set up an ice bath.   I shall be more attentive to the end result in the future.

 

 

  • Like 5

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, lemniscate said:

 

Apparently it's in the Modernist Cuisine books.  First I've heard of it too as far as not ice-bathing.

 

However, during my inquiry I found what I think is an even more "180 degree out thinking" process, heat blanching fresh veg and fruit to extend storage.   Heat Blanching.

 

 

 I seem to recall that Harold McGee  tackled this process quite some time back.   Would be interested to know if anyone has adopted it and what the results were in terms of shelf life of fruits and vegetables.

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Good morning. Once again a sunny and slightly cool morning here in North Eastern Manitoulin Island. 

 

Breakfast was something a little different this morning. Based loosely, very loosely, on the recipe for Pastrami Scrambled Eggs from Shaya.  

 

A9A99CA0-1FBD-4E1A-B64C-594458C552DD.thumb.jpeg.2ba756bf7b86db5c94e526eac325487d.jpeg@blue_dolphin must take sole responsibility  for the hole in my bank account made by the purchase of this book. I swear she could make shoe leather look inviting.


Edited by Anna N Forgot to load the photograph. (log)
  • Like 7
  • Haha 4

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Good morning. Once again a sunny and slightly cool morning here in North Eastern Manitoulin Island. 

 

Breakfast was something a little different this morning. Based loosely, very loosely, on the recipe for Pastrami Scrambled Eggs from Shaya.  

 

@blue_dolphin must take sole responsibility  for the hole in my bank account made by the purchase of this book. I swear she could make shoe leather look inviting.

 

 

I had a hard time deciding whether I should click "Like" for the eggs,  "Thanks" for your acknowledgment of my enabling ability or "Ha ha" for the shoe leather comment 🙃!

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I had a hard time deciding whether I should click "Like" for the eggs,  "Thanks" for your acknowledgment of my enabling ability or "Ha ha" for the shoe leather comment 🙃!

 Trust me it was a compliment.  Your food always looks appetizing.  

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

F33A8D42-AACF-4FA8-840C-7CB3968C66EA.thumb.jpeg.b4796fad84698d5591855ff6c2a1ffca.jpeg

 

Leftover salad, leftover steaks and freshly made chunky ginger-miso-carrot dressing. 

 

  • Like 10

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

CE58DC5B-7C93-4244-9E17-7D4AC31D60E4.thumb.jpeg.59bb0e8cf42db7100ee7ed82089a0bf2.jpeg

 

102B3987-B3E6-417E-9DD2-1B868DD06928.thumb.jpeg.cf91951d582457fd2c889572a17cd8db.jpeg

 

One of two lovely gifts that Kerry’s student brought yesterday.  


Edited by Anna N Typo (log)
  • Like 14

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By ElsieD
      Host's note: the initial title of this thread was "Swarvin' in ???"  as a teaser.  Once the destination was identified as Newfoundland, the title was changed to reflect this.  The initial comments were based on the ??? In the title.
       
       
      And we'll soon be off.......culinary adventures to follow.

    • By ElsieD
      Some of you may recall that in 2016 I had a blog about our trip to Newfoundland.  We are going there again tomorrow for a week, returning July 1 and I thought that since we are going to, and eating at, places different from that year, I would do another blog.  When I booked our flights and accommodations (7 places in 8 nights) last February, June 23rd seemed like a long ways away.  Yet here we are, about to leave.   I hope some of you will follow along as we travel through the province.    
    • By Smithy
      As times and available resources have changed, members have started their own food/travel blogs. These are not listed in the eG Foodblogs index below. You can find them, though, by searching with the tag "foodblog". The tag search box is near the upper right corner of the Forums Main Page. It looks like this:
       

    • By rarerollingobject
      In December, I spent 3 glorious weeks eating my way through Japan; Tokyo, Kanazawa, Kyoto, Sapporo, Hakodate and back to Tokyo. It was my 11th (!) trip to Japan but my mother had never been, so I thought I'd take the old girl over for a good time. We did not kill each other, surprisingly.
       
      I'll come back and caption these a little more informatively over coming weeks, but as you can see, we ate rather a lot. 

      Midori Sushi, Mark City, Shibuya (always my first stop when I arrive in Tokyo, as my preferred hotel is directly above it)
       

      Toro tuna belly,  Midori Sushi, Mark City, Shibuya
       

      Squid gristle for snack time (as you do)
       

      Uni tempura, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Uni tempura, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Eel, fish and scallop tempura, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Clam meat, chopped, stuffed back in clam shell and tempura'd, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Crab leg tempura, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Maitake mushroom (a cluster of them) tempura, Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Squid, prawn which had been alive right up until this point, lotus root tempura, dipping sauce, radish and green tea salt, 
      Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Prawn head tempura, 
      Tsunahachi, Shinjuku
       

      Evening hotel room snack - an AUD$15 tray of uni from Isetan depachika (food basement), Shinjku
       

      Amaebi (sweet raw prawn) gunkan sushi from Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       
      '
      Engawa (flounder fin), lightly grilled, 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Otoro, chutoro and akami tuna, 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Marinated raw baby squid sushi, 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Otoro fatty tuna belly and minced daikon (takuan), 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Fried oysters, 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Negitoro - fatty minced tuna belly and green onion,
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
       

      Salmon, flounder fin and tuna belly aburi (lightly grilled), 
      Umegaoka Sushi No Midori Sohonten, Shibuya
    • By liuzhou
      I have just returned home after four days (three nights) in Guilin. This was a business trip, so no exotic tales this time. Just food. Anyway, despite its reputation, Guilin is actually a rather dull city for the most part - anything interesting lies outside the city in the surrounding countryside.
       
      I was staying in the far east of the city away from the rip-off tourist hotels and restaurants and spent my time with local people eating in normal restaurants.
       
      I arrived in Wednesday just in time for lunch.
       
      LUNCH WEDNESDAY
       
      We started with the obligatory oil tea.
       

      Oil Tea
       

      Omelette with Chinese Chives
       

      Stir-fried Mixed Vegetables
       

      Sour Beef with Pickled Chillies
       

      Cakes*
       

      Morning Glory / Water Spinach**
       
      * I asked what the cakes were but they got rather coy when it came to details. It seems these are unique to this restaurant.
       
      ** The Chinese name is 空心菜 kōng xīn cài, which literally means 'empty heart vegetable', describing the hollow stems.
       
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...