Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

A longtime eGer is known for making an amazing posset.   I have lost his instructions and, worse, access to them.    I'm hoping that, reading this, he will respond and contribute here.    While a year round treat, it seems particularly timely as a light summer dessert.   

 

Please?


eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you might be referring to moi.

 

From Cook's Illustrated - April, 2016

 

LEMON POSSET WITH BERRIES 
SERVES 6 
This dessert requires portioning into individual servings. Reducing the cream mixture to exactly 2 cups creates the best consistency. Transfer the liquid to a 2-cup heatproof liquid measuring cup once or twice during boiling to monitor the amount. Do not leave the cream unattended, as it can boil over easily. 

 

2 cups heavy cream

2/3 cup (4 2/3 ounces) granulated sugar

1 tablespoon grated lemon zest plus 
6 tablespoons juice (2 lemons)

 

1 1/2 cups blueberries or raspberries 

1. Combine cream, sugar, and lemon zest in medium saucepan and bring to boil over medium heat. Continue to boil, stirring frequently to dissolve sugar. If mixture begins to boil over, briefly remove from heat. Cook until mixture is reduced to 2 cups, 8 to 12 minutes. 
2. Remove saucepan from heat and stir in lemon juice. Let sit until mixture is cooled slightly and skin forms on top, about 20 minutes. Strain through fine-mesh strainer into bowl; discard zest. Divide mixture evenly among 6 individual ramekins or serving glasses. 
3. Refrigerate, uncovered, until set, at least 3 hours. Once chilled, possets can be wrapped in plastic wrap and refrigerated for up to 2 days. Unwrap and let sit at room temperature for 10 minutes before serving. Garnish with berries and serve. 

 

  • Like 3

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll do.   ;)        Many thanks.   

 

Question:  Rather than measure and remeasure the cream as it reduces, could you instead measure 2 cups water into your pan to see where 2 cups would come in that pan, then just reduce the cream to that level?    It seems to me that you would lose a fair amount of cream in the measure each time even if using a rubber spatula to return it to the pan.   Besides, I'm lazy.


eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does posset develop a "skin" like custard?  The uncovered refrigeration part has me a bit worried about a skin forming.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, lemniscate said:

Does posset develop a "skin" like custard?  The uncovered refrigeration part has me a bit worried about a skin forming.

 

 

16 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

In my limited experience lemon posset does not form a skin.

 

 

From the recipe I posted above:

 

2. Remove saucepan from heat and stir in lemon juice. Let sit until mixture is cooled slightly and skin forms on top, about 20 minutes. Strain through fine-mesh strainer into bowl; discard zest. Divide mixture evenly among 6 individual ramekins or serving glasses. 

 

From my experiences making this recipe - I definitely have had skin form.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The skin question pertained to refrigeration.

 

I have never made a lemon posset.  However I recently attended a lemon posset presentation by an ICC pastry instructor.  The posset did not have a skin.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

The skin question pertained to refrigeration.

 

I have never made a lemon posset.  However I recently attended a lemon posset presentation by an ICC pastry instructor.  The posset did not have a skin.

 

Who is this guy?   We'll sic the Cook's Illustrated police on him.   


eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Who is this guy?   We'll sic the Cook's Illustrated police on him.   

 

He was Kir Rodriguez.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From Cook's Illustrated:

 

A thin, dry “skin” forms on the surface of puddings because as the mixture is heated, two things happen: Water evaporates, and proteins and sugar become more concentrated. Together, this results in a dry barrier on the liquid’s surface. You can prevent the skin from forming during cooking by stirring, but what about afterward? The most common method is to press parchment paper onto the surface, which prevents evaporation. But this approach can be messy and fussy, particularly when dealing with individual portions in cups or ramekins.

When developing our recipe for Lemon Posset with Berries (see related content), we came up with a simpler way: We let the mixture sit until a skin had formed, passed it through a fine-mesh strainer, and then portioned the pudding and refrigerated it until serving time. The strainer broke up the clumped proteins and sugar, returning the posset to a smooth consistency throughout. We found that this technique will work equally well on other puddings and custards like our Creamy Chocolate Pudding (see related content). After cooking, simply let the pudding or custard cool until a skin forms, about 20 minutes, and then pour it through a fine-mesh strainer into a large bowl. Portion it, and then refrigerate the portions, uncovered, until cool. Cover the cooled portions with plastic wrap (no need to press it onto the surface of the pudding) until serving time.

  • Thanks 1

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@weinoo  Wow, great info.  I would have never thought it worked out that way.  Thanks for posting that.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/26/2019 at 3:58 PM, Margaret Pilgrim said:

You'll do.   ;)        Many thanks.   

 

Question:  Rather than measure and remeasure the cream as it reduces, could you instead measure 2 cups water into your pan to see where 2 cups would come in that pan, then just reduce the cream to that level?    It seems to me that you would lose a fair amount of cream in the measure each time even if using a rubber spatula to return it to the pan.   Besides, I'm lazy.

I use a chopstick..mark the level you need using water in the cooking pot.  Then check your levels with the stick.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First go at Lemon Posset has just finished the reduction phase, waiting for the skin formation phase.  I used a honey lemon syrup I made a while back as the flavoring.   Initial sneak taste test is creamy, tangy and slightly decadent.   Internet searches tells me it freezes well also.

  • Like 1
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Posset.  Tan tinge to it due to the honey.   I think the bubbles frozen in the surface give it....character.  It's delicious.

IMG_8120.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...