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akonsu

I have a problem with gianduja blooming

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Hello,

 

I made gianduja using 1:1:1 ratio of dark chocolate, tahini and sugar powder.

 

After a day or so it starts blooming.

 

I tried tempering it twice. The first time, I just stirred it constantly until it cooled just below 27 Celsius. The second time I did the same but I also added some tempered chocolate (at about 33 C) to it while stirring. Nothing helped.

 

If I wrap it into a food plastic wrapper and let it set, it is alright for a day or so, but it turns whitish anyway a couple of days later. If I do not wrap it then it gets all white right after it solidifies.

 

The temperature in the room where I keep it is about 20 C. When I prepared it, I let it set at room temperature for about an hour after I made it, and when it got solid, I put it into a fridge, and took it out after an hour or so, and since then I kept it either at 20 C or in a fridge.

 

Please help...

 

Thanks!

 

konstantin

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What Kerry said, if you are starting from all the 3 ingredients mixed together and melted untempered chocolate. Personally I prefer to start from melted tempered chocolate, then add nut paste and sugar.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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Thanks, everyone. I believe I was given a wrong advice by the Greweling book then:

 

> the easiest way to temper it is usually to put the entire batch onto a marble slab
> and agitate it generously until it is cooled to 27°C/80°F or below. At this temperature,

> after constant agitation, it is safe to assume that the gianduja is tempered.

 

Instead of a slab, which I do not have, I used a bowl of cold water with ice, like a bain-marie.

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Just now, akonsu said:

Thanks, everyone. I believe I was given a wrong advice by the Greweling book then:

 

> the easiest way to temper it is usually to put the entire batch onto a marble slab
> and agitate it generously until it is cooled to 27°C/80°F or below. At this temperature,

> after constant agitation, it is safe to assume that the gianduja is tempered.

 

Instead of a slab, which I do not have, I used a bowl of cold water with ice, like a bain-marie.

That works for meltaway (actually cool until it starts to thicken) - gianduja needs a little more futzing I find. 

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Gianduja depends on the nut paste you are using: hazelnut is different from pistachio, which is different from sesame, so on. Different nut paste, different tempering curve: each nut oil affects cocoa butter in a different way. Different chocolate to nut paste ratio, different tempering curve. Greweling can't give a tempering curve for each case, it would take half the book. That's why he says "cooled to 27°C/80°F or below": "below" is really important here, he is not saying that when you cool it to 27°C then you are always game, he is meaning it's possible you need to go below. When working with chocolate you can't work it trusting temperatures and limiting your decisions on watching the temperature. You need to develop the "feel", which means becoming able to notice if what you have in your hands is tempered or not. Which takes lots of tempering tests at the beginning, then a bit of eye and feeling for the texture.

For gianduja it's easier to start with tempered chocolate. Knowing when pure chocolate is tempered is much easier. Tempering by hand 1 part of pure chocolate is quicker and easier than tempering 3 parts of gianduja. If you start from tempered chocolate then the tempering agitation is made on 1x mass, if you start from untempered chocolate and temper the full gianduja then the tempering agitation is made on 3x mass (more manual work).

Having said this, if you ended up with a good amount of gianduja that is out of temper, then the only thing to do is remelt it and temper by hand, going below 27°C as was suggested by Kerry.

 

 

 

Teo

 

  • Like 3

Teo

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I wonder how you are storing it and how large of a batch it is. If it is in a large mass would the latent heat of crystallization be enough to cause bloom?

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Thanks. That is helpful. I still do not know how to test (in a reasonable time, while working on it) if gianduja is tempered... I would not expect tempered gianduja to solidify in a few minutes like chocolate does. How do I tell if it's tempered? So that I could develop the feel for it, that Teo is talking about.

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2 hours ago, teonzo said:

Different chocolate to nut paste ratio, different tempering curve. Greweling can't give a tempering curve for each case, it would take half the book. That's why he says "cooled to 27°C/80°F or below": "below" is really important here

I understand now. Thanks. I usually read things like this as that I can cool it to 27 C but it is ok to go lower, not that it might be necessary to go lower. I would expect that these things are spelled out explicitly. Reminds me of something I read about Buddha somewhere, he would respond to questions in a manner that were very difficult to understand, the phrases had to be interpreted the right way and thought about to be understood... : ) Perhaps I need to switch my brain on. Thanks again.

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13 hours ago, akonsu said:

I still do not know how to test (in a reasonable time, while working on it) if gianduja is tempered... I would not expect tempered gianduja to solidify in a few minutes like chocolate does. How do I tell if it's tempered?

 

Pick up some with a palette knife / spatula / whatever metal tool with a flat surface, then put it in the fridge for around 5 minutes. If it's tempered then it will detach easily and neatly from the metal surface, if it's not tempered then it will stick. Just like tempered chocolate, with the difference that gianduja is softer and does not snap.

 

 

 

12 hours ago, akonsu said:

Thanks. I usually read things like this as that I can cool it to 27 C but it is ok to go lower, not that it might be necessary to go lower. I would expect that these things are spelled out explicitly.

 

The "problem" is that you are using a professional textbook in an amateur environment. Professionals grows step by step: you learn the first stage, then you pass to the second only after you learned the first. In this case: you work with gianduja only after you learned to temper chocolate and have mastered it.

Making things at home you want to reach the end result as soon as possible instead of practicing the basics procedures (which are boring, we all know that), which ends up being before you are ready for it. Eagerness for the final results is not a defect, but you pay it with this kind of troubles: you are jumping to things too fast, so you are not ready to catch the nuances.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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