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Shelby

Milling Heritage and Ancient Grains for Baking Bread and Beyond

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52 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

I am sad to report that my Vitamix ground Durum wheat pasta experiment is an epic fail...it’s in the bin.  Absolutely no elasticity...it crumbled through the pasta roller🤕

Maybe cutting it with some all purpose or 00 flour.

i will be interest in proper milled flour works.

@Paul Bacino what kind of pasta extruded do you have?

Do you think it had mostly to do with using the Vitamix to grind?  Or the wheat itself doesn't have enough gluten which would be why you would add some AP flour...... I haven't run across anyone adding vital wheat gluten but that doesn't mean it isn't done ---I've been reading about making pasta from home milled flour (just a bit this morning online).  

 

My eyes are a bit crossed from all of the studying I've been doing lol.

 

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Probably a combo of the lack of fine grind and the grain not having enough gluten.  Here a picture just after I mixed it and attempted to knead....that did not work; and a picture of it dropping through the pasta roller.

DSC03067.thumb.jpg.f966a367860cdede3cb576af845b7e91.jpgDSC03072.thumb.jpg.4d3b9fee5ab42c142ce931faed8cbd87.jpg

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I let it rest a few minutes before kneading and it was about one cup of flour to one egg and a little mist of water to bring it together...oh and a teaspoon of oil.

I let the dough rest in the fridge overnight before attempting to roll it.

It was so far away from pasta dough.

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5 hours ago, rotuts said:

the pineapple juice trick is demo'd here :

 

https://breadtopia.com/make-your-own-sourdough-starter/

 

and credit is given to Peter Reinhart

 

I have some of his books from the library and they re very interesting to study.

 

I think Reinhart credits it to someone else in Bread Baker's Apprentice. I'll check my copy when I get home this evening.

It's not essential to use the pineapple juice, it just encourages the right bacteria to grow in the acidic conditions. If you're making your starter from freshly milled wheat berries I don't think you'll have a problem getting a beautiful sourdough starter from that, as it's the microorganisms in the berries (or in the flour) that create the starter - the idea that it's yeast and bacteria from the air is nice but probably wrong. Or at least, mostly wrong. I'm sure some drift in there, but practically none compared to the numbers that are already in the flour.

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Im going to do this soon myself

 

w rye

 

heritage , of course !

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15 hours ago, Paul Bacino said:

I have that very same grinder.  I haven't got into using it yet.

 

Thanks for posting on this maybe it will put a fire in the behind--   My plan : I have a pasta extruder that I plan to use it on.   Not much of a baker at least for now

 

Thanks  PB

I wanted to mention that Paul Bertolli's book Cooking by hand talks a lot about grinding flour for pasta. Older book, but still excellent

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Today was going to be a mill/bread day but my washer broke and I had to spend the morning figuring out what the heck was going on. I'm all fixed up now, but I'm kinda pooped.

 

I fed my starter again yesterday about 5.  It looks really good right after that, but then it fizzles.  It still smells good and it has bubbles, but it doesn't double in size like the instructions say.  I'm not giving up yet.

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4 hours ago, Shelby said:

I fed my starter again yesterday about 5.  It looks really good right after that, but then it fizzles.  It still smells good and it has bubbles, but it doesn't double in size like the instructions say.  I'm not giving up yet.

 

my sourdough starter (from freshly ground wheat) took a week before it showed any bubbles, then another week before it was able to be fed daily. I made one from raisins that took three weeks to start. Definitely don't give up yet!

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34 minutes ago, keychris said:

 

my sourdough starter (from freshly ground wheat) took a week before it showed any bubbles, then another week before it was able to be fed daily. I made one from raisins that took three weeks to start. Definitely don't give up yet!

Oh thank you thank you thank you.  I needed this.  Mine has bubbles at times and then looks like it's dead .   I will keep going.  

 

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It is indeed a handsome machine. I'll be really curious to hear of the taste difference in bread made with freshly milled flour.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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On 6/12/2019 at 8:32 AM, keychris said:

 

I think Reinhart credits it to someone else in Bread Baker's Apprentice. I'll check my copy when I get home this evening.

 

My mistake, the reference was in Whole Grain Breads. See attached.

 

20190613_180537.jpg

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15 hours ago, Shelby said:

Ok.  Using the pineapple juice method, I now have two more starters going:

 

IMG_6386.JPG.9962e33995ea92baf3ec4f9b37675000.JPG

 

These both should be ready to use by next Wednesday.

 

Don't be surprised or disheartened if they're not. It takes time to build up the microbial population to a level where they can do what they need to in bread.

 

Edit to add: I just read the article you linked, if you're going to be making bread, get used to working by weight, not volume. It's much more reliable in getting consistent results. Have a read of the EG kitchen scale manifesto if you haven't already seen it :)

 


Edited by keychris (log)
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