Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Panaderia Canadiense

eG Foodblog: Panaderia Canadiense 2019 - EAT! Empanadas, Arepas, Tortillas and Other Ambato Food On the Go

Recommended Posts

While I wait for my video to upload, I want to talk a bit about a neat phenomenon in Ecuadorian barrios - Hornado Solidario, or solidarity pig roasts.  When someone in the community needs that bit of extra help, everybody will pitch in to buy a pig and roast it, then put up some speakers and sell it to whoever passes by.  A dish of solidarity roast usually costs about $3 and features a generous portion of wood-oven roasted pig, lettuce, mote (exploded flint corn), and encurtido (fresh-pickled onion and tomato salad).  Sometimes there are also llapingachos, the potato tortillas that traditionally accompany pork dishes.  This one was in Barrio La Vicentina in favour of Kevan, who is trying to buy a new prosthetic leg.

 

IMG_20190615_110438.thumb.jpg.4a7a7d4c42209b36f911b1d9091f54bc.jpg IMG_20190615_110520.thumb.jpg.a5315a3f37b573ff19ad9c1cb77f26d8.jpg

 

This is an older barrio, and it still has its urban orchards very much intact.  This lot has two big guabo (ice-cream bean) trees, a couple of walnuts, an Abyssinian apricot, a pear, and a capulí (Andean weeping cherry) in it, from what I could see - and there are probably also pear, peach, and plum trees in there.  Out on the sidewalk in front of the wall is a large pile of oca, a traditional Andean tuber, which have been laid out in a sunbeam to break down their natural oxalates and make them sweeter.

 

IMG_20190615_110100.thumb.jpg.29683b297f8324dd948b7856cfccb3d7.jpg

 

I was in the Vicentina to deliver a pie to my chiropractor - and I'm disappointed to report that only my pictures of the raw pie turned out - the others overexposed.  So, here's a raw black cherry pie!  It smelled amazing coming out of the oven this morning.

 

IMG_20190615_083151.thumb.jpg.5192677d2d766f1e96bb63f196b69d67.jpg

  • Like 14

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And here's the Molle!  These trees, Schinus molle, are common in Ambato and other parts of dry highland Ecuador; they're native to the Peruvian Andes and are all along the old Inca trade routes.  These ones in particular are in a very steep public greenspace, which means that harvesting them is not for the faint of heart.

 

 

 

These are fairly young trees, probably around 50 years; harvesting them helps keep the trees healthy and productive.  The older pepper trees in the city are thought to be close to 400 years of age, and they're also productive.  However, they're in easy to access parks, so they're already stripped clean.  It's been a pleasantly sunny day, which has wreaked havoc on my photos, but the harvest is really good this year.  It's always smart to wear gloves to harvest Molle; they're spicy, and the juice will persist on your hands, making it fairly horrible if you scratch your nose by accident.  Mom and I picked a 10-gallon pail full of racemes of peppercorns; when we get home, we'll pick them through.  It's probably about two pounds of total yield once it's been winnowed; we barely harvested the tips of the two lowest-hanging branches.  It will be enough pepper for the kitchen and to share, for the upcoming year.

 

The general philosophy of things growing on public land is that one takes what one needs, and leaves the rest for other people who need it.  This particular greenspace has four big Molles on it, two of which bear fruit and two of which are males, which are necessary for fruiting.  The amount of pepper produced on just one of them is close to half a tonne if it were all harvested at once.  The greenspace also has wild spinach, yacon, berry lantana, and a number of medicinal plants growing on it.

 

IMG_20190615_114841.thumb.jpg.18af03d0505bbb4788555511ea023014.jpg IMG_20190615_114822.thumb.jpg.9ea45dc27d7bf467b2577b016bd64a6e.jpg  IMG_20190615_115539.thumb.jpg.4789a223b362f4e78f3e0de1982a3542.jpg

IMG_20190615_115754.thumb.jpg.0cb963fbc18b0fe7dfde997ea2953336.jpg IMG_20190615_120949.thumb.jpg.675af4cb1b1bd3c3879a7104dcfd8e35.jpg IMG_20190615_121525.thumb.jpg.eb151f0fde4fdf828cc63bb08cd94056.jpg

IMG_20190615_130044.thumb.jpg.2362a168e24791b6db958b7ea06e1434.jpg

  • Like 13

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Panaderia Canadiense

 

what a Dummie Ive been !

 

nothing new they say !

 

I thought your blog was over !

 

Im grateful it not just quite yet 

 

thank you again for taking the time to continue Posting !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/14/2019 at 10:59 AM, Panaderia Canadiense said:

Friday delivery is four totes of food, packed full (about 120 pounds), strapped to a wheeler, and the basket is stuffed full - it normally weighs around 30 lbs at the beginning of the day.

 

How are you transporting all this heavy deliciousness?  Entirely on your own on foot or are vehicles or a driver involved?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had no idea the pink peppercorns from those trees were edible! We call them "pepper trees" in California, but I grew up thinking they were simply lovely ornamentals with a wonderful smell. The next time I visit, if the peppercorns are ripe, I'll try to harvest some. 

 

This has been a delightful blog. Thank you very much for showing us more of your part of the world, and your life there.

  • Like 3

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have enjoyed this week with you, thank you for sharing with us!  Had you previously told about what prompted you to leave Canada for Ecuador, and I missed it?  After the comment about speaking out and the govt keeping tabs I will admit to some worrying about you and will want to know you and your family are safe.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

How are you transporting all this heavy deliciousness?  Entirely on your own on foot or are vehicles or a driver involved?

 

We take a taxi from home to the downtown, and the rest of it is done on foot.  It's impractical to have a delivery vehicle in downtown Ambato, where the streets were designed for horse and buggy - there's almost no parking, and traffic can jam up easily.

 

1 hour ago, JeanneCake said:

I have enjoyed this week with you, thank you for sharing with us!  Had you previously told about what prompted you to leave Canada for Ecuador, and I missed it?  After the comment about speaking out and the govt keeping tabs I will admit to some worrying about you and will want to know you and your family are safe.

 

I don't think I touched on it in this blog (although I have talked about it extensively in the past), but the short version is that my parents retired here.  I followed for a vacation, and basically never left because there was much more opportunity for me here, and because I'm not a huge fan of northern Alberta winters.

 

1 hour ago, Smithy said:

I had no idea the pink peppercorns from those trees were edible! We call them "pepper trees" in California, but I grew up thinking they were simply lovely ornamentals with a wonderful smell. The next time I visit, if the peppercorns are ripe, I'll try to harvest some.

 

They're not only edible, but a very expensive spice when you buy them commercially!  Pink peppercorns are perfectly ripe when the berries are bright pink and still firm to the touch.  Just a word of caution, though - the Molle tree is in the same family as Cashews, and if you're at all sensitive to tree nuts the pepper can cause an allergic reaction.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Smithy said:

I had no idea the pink peppercorns from those trees were edible! We call them "pepper trees" in California, but I grew up thinking they were simply lovely ornamentals with a wonderful smell. The next time I visit, if the peppercorns are ripe, I'll try to harvest some. 

 

Just pull the princessmobile around to the end of my driveway and help yourself.   This once magnificent tree was badly butchered at the behest of the electric company a few weeks ago

1598818674_IMG_4735(1).thumb.jpg.a1c4e0f7401d33c32148d429e61da3e4.jpg

 

But there are still plenty of pink peppercorns within easy reach.

IMG_6492.thumb.jpg.047d77c97ac79d0e0a61d2fd9a96ef46.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And here's my sendoff - after a quick cheese sandwich with pickles, and inspired by picking molle (which is one of the hidden spices in really good Mole Poblano), I had a tortilla night!

 

But first, a word about Ecuadorian pickles.  So, that plate in the background of my sandwich looks like common pickles - some bread n butter, and some gherkins.  You would be shocked upon tasting them, if that were your expectation.  The sliced ones are closest to hamburger dills, and the gherkins are some of the absolute strongest, sourest pickles I have ever eaten.  They go well with other strong flavours, like aged gouda and rye, which was the sandwich.  However, I remember that upon having recently moved here I bought a bag of them thinking they were going to be the sweet-ish little cucumbers I was used to from Canada, and getting a really rude shock when I popped the first one in my mouth!

 

IMG_20190615_132405.thumb.jpg.8e21fe33469b90f34ecac4683f2fe4a4.jpg

 

Now, tortilla night.  I realized at about 4 o'clock last night that I hadn't actually managed to find any tortillas on my week's wanders.  But!  I'm lucky, in that I live close to the barrio of Los Sauces, which is where most of Ambato's Mexican expat community has settled.  As a result, the tienda for that barrio, which is just three blocks away, stocks ingredients for Mexican cooking including handmade soft corn tortillas, and something any of you who has visited Mexico will instantly recognize: Bimbo flour tortillas!  I was lucky enough to get there close to the milk truck from Cotopaxi as well - it meant there was Nata (cultured clotted cream) still in the coolers.  With a bit of spiced ground chicken, guacamole, diced tomato, lettuce, and cheese (and palm hearts!) it made a filling and delicious soft taco and burrito kind of dinner.

 

IMG_20190615_191826.thumb.jpg.3ae0756cd5f0d9597debe45eb0e3ddb7.jpg IMG_20190615_191817.thumb.jpg.88f5e5c5f6d966825125b915f6eafb80.jpg IMG_20190615_192216.thumb.jpg.98652e6cbe0a7781d45e5f7ab6c1d278.jpg

IMG_20190615_192342.thumb.jpg.d96e329dcae96f4483972c936b2c77be.jpg IMG_20190615_192657.thumb.jpg.7eb3d4550104c549eaffa00c56f80783.jpg IMG_20190615_192743.thumb.jpg.9a85c4f76492ca41844e7394fdd5a0f1.jpg

 

  • Like 9
  • Delicious 1

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for sharing your week with us.  I really enjoyed it.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

I am enjoying this so much, Beth!  The videos are so great and I love hearing your voice!

As Kim said, it was a wonderful blog and so much fun to see a photo of you and hear your voice.  I am so glad that you have made a home in Ecuador and that you are happy there.  And yes, I could do without the winters also.  

  • Like 2

Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So sad to see this end!  Thank you for all this - I really enjoyed a glimpse into your life!!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 This blog ended far too soon! Thank you. I enjoyed every single posting and learned quite a bit in the process. I hope you won’t have to disappear again because your contributions are really appreciated.

  • Like 5

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By sartoric
      We love Japan ! 
      I don’t know why it hasn’t been on my travel radar until recently. The people, the places, the culture and history, and especially the FOOD.
      There will be no Michelin stars in this report, nor will there be names of restaurants. We ate mainly at isakaya, (local restaurants where there were often only four or five seats), markets (including supermarkets) with a few larger restaurants for balance. There is food available anywhere and anytime if you know where to look. Rather than large meals we tended to snack our way through the day. Some of the best things we ate at “standing bars” no chairs provided. 
      Karaage chicken with salad and miso was first up.

       
      The window displays are amazing, you can walk many city blocks underground through various shopping malls, handy when it rained our first day.

       
      At a local place. Chicken teriyaki, grilled peppers, potato salad, pickles.

       
      Charcoal hibachi.

       
      Grew to love sake.

       
       
    • By Mullinix18
      I'm thinking about starting a blog featuring the recipes of antoine Carême that I've translated from 1700s French? No English versions of his works exist and his work is hard to find, even though he is the greatest chef who ever lived. After I get through his works I'd add menon, la Varenne, and other hard to find, but historically important masters of French cuisine. 
    • By Duvel
      Prologue:
       
      Originally, we intended to spend this Chinese New Year in Hong Kong. We have travelled a lot last year and will need to attend a wedding already next month in Germany, so I was happy to spend some quiet days at home (and keep the spendings a bit under control as well). As a consequence, we had not booked any flights in the busiest travel time of the year in this region …
       
      But – despite all good intentions – I found myself two weeks ago calling the hotline of my favourite airline in the region, essentially cashing in on three years of extensive business travel and checking where I could get on short notice over CNY on miles. I was expecting a laughter on the other side of the line but this is the one time my status in their loyalty reward program paid out big time: three seats for either Seoul or Kansai International (earliest morning flights, of course). No need to choose, really – Kyoto, here we come !
       

    • By Tara Middleton
      Alright so as of a few months ago, I decided to take an impromptu trip to Europe--mostly unplanned but with several priorities set in mind: find the best food and locate the most game-changing ice cream spots on the grounds of each city I sought out for. One of the greatest, most architecturally unique and divine cities I have visited thus far has gotta be Vienna, Austria. But what in the heck is there to eat over there?! (you might ask). 'Cause I sure as hell didn't know. So, I desperately reached out to a local Viennese friend of mine, who knows and understands my avid passion for all things edible, and she immediately shot back some must-have food dishes. Doing a bit of research beforehand, I knew I had to try the classic "Kasekreiner". Please forgive my German if I spelled that wrong. But no matter how you say it- say it with passion, because passion is just about all I felt when I ate it. Translated: it basically means cheese sausage. Honestly, what is there not to love about those two words. Even if that's not necessarily your go-to, do me a favor and give it a shot. Trust me, you won't regret it. A classic Austrian pork sausage with pockets of melty cheese, stuffed into a crisp French Baguette. No ketchup necessary (...and as an American, that's saying a lot). YUM. Best spot to try out this one-of-a-kind treat?! Bitzinger bei der Albertina – Würstelstand. Now here's a shot of me with my one true love in front of this classic Viennese green-domed building-- Karlskirche. Now, go check it.
       
       

    • By KennethT
      OK, I'm back, by popular demand! hehe....  After being back for 2 days, I'm still struggling with crazy jetlag and exhaustion - so please bear with me!
       
      This year, for our Asian adventure, we went to Bali, which for those who don't know, is one of the islands in Indonesia.  Bali is a very unique place - from its topology, to the people, language, customs, religion and food.  Whereas the majority of people in Indonesia are Muslim, most people in Bali are Balinese Hindu, which from what I understand is a little like Indian Hinduism, but has more ancestor worship.  Religion is very important to many people in Bali - there are temples everywhere, and at least in one area, there are religious processions through the street practically every day - but we'll get to that later.
       
      Bali has some food unique to it among its Indonesian neighbors, but like everywhere, has seen quite a bit of immigration from other Indonesian islands (many from Java, just to the west) who have brought their classic dishes with them.
       
      Basically all Indonesians speak Indonesian, or what they call Bahasa Indonesia, or just Bahasa, which, anyone who has read my prior foodblogs wouldn't be surprised to hear that I learned a little bit just before the trip.  Unfortunately, I didn't get to use any of it, except a couple times which were totally unnecessary.  When speaking with each other, most people in Bali speak Balinese (totally different from bahasa) - many times when I tried using my bahasa, they smiled and replied, and then tried to teach me the same phrase in Balinese!  As time went on, and I used some of the Balinese, I got lots of surprised smiles and laughs - who is this white guy speaking Balinese?!?  Seriously though, tourism has been in Bali for a very long time, so just about everyone we encountered spoke English to some degree.  Some people spoke German as well, as they supposedly get lots of tourists from Germany.  As one of our drivers was telling us, Bali is heavily dependent on tourism as they have no real industry other than agriculture, which doesn't pay nearly as well as tourism does.
       
      While there are beaches all around the island, most of the popular beach areas are in the south of the island, and those areas are the most highly touristed.  We spent very little time in the south as we are not really beach people (we get really bored) and during planning, decided to stay in less touristed areas so we'd have more opportunities for local food... this didn't work out, as you'll see later.
       
      So, it wouldn't be a KennethT foodblog without photos in the Taipei airport and I-Mei Dim Sum, which we called home for about 4 hours before our connection to Bali...
       
      Beef noodle soup:

       
      The interior:

       
      This was the same as always - huge pieces of beef were meltingly tender.  Good bite to the thick chewy noodles.
       
      Xie long bao (soup dumplings) and char siu bao (fluffy barbeque pork buns):

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...