Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Wholemeal Crank

Filling bundt cakes: beyond 'tunnel of fudge'

Recommended Posts

I remember making bundt cakes with 'baked-in' filling, and now I wonder:  would a basic fruit curd stand up to being baked in the middle of a bundt cake without horrible texture fail?

 

Could something like this basic curd work, chilled enough to allow it to be applied with a pastry bag over the half-filled bundt cake batter, and topped with more batter?  Dreaming now of a pistachio cake with pomegranate filling, but thinking about other combinaions as well--what are the key characteristics required in a 'bake-in' filling?

 

2/3 cup sugar
2 T cornstarch
1 cup pomegranate juice
1/4 cup lemon juice

5 egg yolks, whisked together

1/3 cup butter, cut into chunks


Stirred the sugar, cornstarch and juices together until there were no lumps, then brought it to about 160 degrees. Gradually added it to the whisked eggs, returned to heat, brought to near boil so the cornstarch thickened, then strained it into a bowl, whisked in the butter, and poured into serving dishes to chill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a subscriber so can get behind the paywall, sort of.....they want me to pay even more for access to their back recipes.

 

But I can see the recipe above, and it's about altering a bit of the batter, which is another way to approach the issue:  I could take the base cake batter and mix a portion of it with pomegranate molasses and swirl that in, which would get a lot of the same flavor elements, but not the curd texture I'm dreaming about. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I would avoid egg yolks and butter, they would mask the pomegranate taste. I would avoid lemon juice too.

 

I made something similar years ago, here is the photo:

 

saccottini_patatadolce_melagrana.jpg.2a26828166d5a47ae7691722789ab576.jpg

 

They were "saccottini" made with sweet potato dough (Italian sweet potato, which is grey) and a pomegranate filling. It's different from a bundt cake in the sense that in my case the dough was a laminated yeasted dough, so during the cooking process it's "harder" than a bundt cake batter, but I don't think there are risks for the filling to run out of the cake batter.

 

I used this recipe:

 

50 g   cornstarch

450 g    pomegranate juice

120 g    sugar  (I used cane sugar to make it vegan)

 

Put cornstarch in a pot, add about 50 g pomegranate juice, whisk to dissolve the cornstarch and break all the lumps (if you add all the pomegranate juice then it's harder to break all the lumps). Add the remaining pomegranate juice and the sugar, whisk to dissolve. Cook whisking constantly, when it starts making the first bubbles then lower the flame to the minimum, keep cooking for other 2 minutes (always whisking). Let it cool, then use.

 

Result had a soft "creamy" texture, should be what you are looking for.

 

 

 

Teo

 

  • Like 2

Teo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tunnel cakes were a thing in the 70's. Not necessariy baked in - but tunneled out after baking. My mom's entertainment dessert  for special folk  was angel food split  and tunneled  out. (innards pulled out) with a stunning black cherry mousse "tunnel".  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, teonzo said:

Personally I would avoid egg yolks and butter, they would mask the pomegranate taste. I would avoid lemon juice too.

 

I made something similar years ago, here is the photo:

 

saccottini_patatadolce_melagrana.jpg.2a26828166d5a47ae7691722789ab576.jpg

 

Those look delicious!

 

I am specifically asking about this curd, which I created as part of a different dish (a tart with apples and pomegranate curd), and I loved the pomegranate curd as written , with the richness of the eggs and the butter.  What I am wondering about are the limits of a cornstarch/egg curd or custard being used to 'fill' a cake by being baked inside it--will they separate or liquify or come out (when cooled) as a thick sliceable center to a slice of cake?

 

Today I went simple and prepared a pomegranate curd to pour over the pistachio cake.  There's lots of room for improvement because I discovered that pomegranate molasses has too strong of a 'cooked' flavor already to substitute for pomegranate juice, although the intensification of the pomegranate flavor was pleasing against the relatively bland cake. 

 

I think the way to go for practice is small-batch cupcakes with dollops of filling to see how each filling is affected by being 'baked in'.  Walk before I run....

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, heidih said:

Tunnel cakes were a thing in the 70's. Not necessariy baked in - but tunneled out after baking. My mom's entertainment dessert  for special folk  was angel food split  and tunneled  out. (innards pulled out) with a stunning black cherry mousse "tunnel".  

 That sounds delicious.   But I'd rather be lazy and 'bake it in' than to hollow out and keep it neat. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I use lemon curd as a tart filling, I sometimes put the tart in the oven for 5-10 minutes to set; it's the same principle as lemon bars. I'm going to venture a guess that you'd want to layer the cake batter in,  chill it, use a spoon to make a moat, put the cold curd in the moat then pour the rest of the batter over it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Wholemeal Crank said:

I am specifically asking about this curd, which I created as part of a different dish (a tart with apples and pomegranate curd), and I loved the pomegranate curd as written , with the richness of the eggs and the butter.  What I am wondering about are the limits of a cornstarch/egg curd or custard being used to 'fill' a cake by being baked inside it--will they separate or liquify or come out (when cooled) as a thick sliceable center to a slice of cake? 

 

Ah, I thought that recipe was new to you, so things are different.

 

Possible problems with your recipe are these ones:

1- curd's egg proteins coagulate during the cake cooking process, so the curd becomes grainy;

2- cake cooking process breaks the curd's emulsion (lots of butter there), so the curd becomes grainy;

3- curd becomes too runny during the cake cooking process, so it ends up being (partially) absorbed by the underlying cake batter.

 

Case 1 should not apply here: you already cooked the egg yolks while making the curd, so there should be no risk.

Case 2 could happen, most custards that are baked in the oven don't have troubles but some do, it depends on the single recipe and the cooking process. I would say this is possible but chances are small.

Case 3 is more probable. You have the cornstarch that binds water, but there is that lot of butter that liquefies before the cake batter starts setting (egg proteins are still uncooked, starches are not gelatinized). This is the more worrysome risk, especially if it's combined with case 2.

Only way to know is trying.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, teonzo said:

 

Ah, I thought that recipe was new to you, so things are different.

 

Possible problems with your recipe are these ones:

1- curd's egg proteins coagulate during the cake cooking process, so the curd becomes grainy;

2- cake cooking process breaks the curd's emulsion (lots of butter there), so the curd becomes grainy;

3- curd becomes too runny during the cake cooking process, so it ends up being (partially) absorbed by the underlying cake batter.

 

Case 1 should not apply here: you already cooked the egg yolks while making the curd, so there should be no risk.

Case 2 could happen, most custards that are baked in the oven don't have troubles but some do, it depends on the single recipe and the cooking process. I would say this is possible but chances are small.

Case 3 is more probable. You have the cornstarch that binds water, but there is that lot of butter that liquefies before the cake batter starts setting (egg proteins are still uncooked, starches are not gelatinized). This is the more worrysome risk, especially if it's combined with case 2.

Only way to know is trying.

 

 

 

Teo

 

 

Thank you, this is exactly what I was groping towards asking.  I think I have figured out a way to test this with much smaller batches as cupcakes, and will report back on how it goes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a way to minimize risks:

- prepare the pomegranate curd, then the pistachio cake batter;

- prepare one single cupcake, made with pistachio cake batter and inside a dollop of the pomegranate curd;

- cook the single cupcake and see what happens, if it's ok then you go on with your initial plan (pistachio cake with the pomegranate curd filling), if it's not ok then you prepare a standard pistachio cake, then fill it with the pomegranate curd after it's cooked and cooled.

This way you waste a single cupcake at most.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was forgetting an important thing: shelf life.

If you succeed in making the filled bundt cake, then beware for how much time you store it and where you store it. That pomegranate curd does not have long shelf life at room temperature, I doubt it can reach the 2 days mark. So be careful about this, since we are talking about a whole cake and it's possible you are planning to eat it in multiple days. If so, store it in the fridge. It's a problem for the cake part, since it becomes tough due to the butter hardening. You can warm the slices in a microwave, but there is another problem related to this: the curd will heat much more than the cake part, due to the much higher water content.

 

 

 

Teo

 

  • Like 1

Teo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The plan was to prepare this for a potluck party, with no concern for leftovers past about 36 hours. 

 

But it's another good point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please report back, thanks!

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be interested in hearing how it works.  As you probably did, I googled fruit curd bundt cakes and found a number of recipes. Some had visible curd but in others, it seemed to have melted or been absorbed by the cake, sometimes even by people using the same recipes. Most of them were lemon curd/lemon cake so there wasn't much contrast either way.  Your particular combination of pinkish curd and greenish cake has the potential to become anrather unpleasant brownish shade if it doesn't stay separate.  I'm sure the flavors would be delightful either way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/30/2019 at 2:02 PM, heidih said:

Tunnel cakes were a thing in the 70's. Not necessariy baked in - but tunneled out after baking.

 

Indeed tunneled out after baking.     From mid-century Betty Crocker Picture Cookook

photo.thumb.JPG.d388f8556c3942f4d2df0405fba0e800.JPG


eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Margaret Pilgrim

 

I have that same book from the low '50's

 

it was my mothers

 

and I loved leafing through all those pages 

 

and so many pictures !

 

the binder and the punch holes made it something special for me

 

its still a treasure for me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a lot of wisdom in that book.    My m-i-l introduced me to Poteca, an Austrian/Yugoslav walnut-filled bread.    She told me that it was close to impossible to make, only passed down grandmother to mother to daughter.    And, lo and behold, there it is on page 117 of the BCPC.    Simple and correct.    No discernible differences between mine via BCPC and my grand-m-i-l's.   

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly So .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Nn, M.D.
      Hello all! I am excited present a cake that has taken weeks of mental planning and troubleshooting.  What I will say is that making this cake has taught me so much about mastering a technique rather than a recipe, and I think that lies at the heart of what it takes to be a good baker.
       
      I wanted to re-create the flavors of ginger ale by making a cake that was very ginger-forward, but that also that was balanced and scrumptious.  The start of the recipe is the crystallized ginger.
      ¾ cup ginger, peeled and sliced to 1/8th in thick
      3 cups water
      ¾ cups sugar
       
      Peel about 8 oz fresh ginger root.  Slice the ginger on a bias; I used a mandolin to get my slices even thickness.  Add to saucepan with high sides, and pour the water over top. Bring to a boil and reduce to a strong simmer for 30-35 min.  Take off the heat and drain the broth, reserving 3 tablespoons (I saved the rest of the broth in ice trays, and it will go in teas and shakes).  Add sugar and water to drained ginger and place on medium high heat.  Stir constantly until water dissolves and sugar recrystallizes on ginger's surface, about 10 minutes.  Pour onto sheet pan to cool completely and dry, at least 1 hour.

       
      Since I was already peeling ginger, I went ahead and peeled some more for my ginger jelly.  Shout out to the eGullet community: I asked*** about how to create some sort of jam or jelly to fill the cake, and you guys provided such great help.  I adapted some techniques from a few recipes to come up with one of my own, and I think it came out quite well.
      ⅔ cup ginger, peeled and grated or chopped in food processor
      5 cups water
      2 cups sugar
      1 medium lemon, zested and juiced
      seeds from lemon
      1 packet liquid pectin
       
      Add ginger and water to saucepan and bring to boil.   Reduce to simmer for 10 minutes.

      Then add sugar, lemon juice, and zest to pan and increase heat to medium high.  

      Allow to boil for 15 minutes, then add pectin and stir.  Cook for another 5 minutes and then remove from heat to cool completely.  Consider using a piece of cling-film on the surface to prevent a skin from forming.  When cooled, run through a fine mesh strainer to remove ginger chunks.

       
      I went with a genoise sponge because it's my favorite sponge to make.  It's very simple, very elegant, and very easy to customize.  I tried replacing 1 egg with 3 egg yolks and I think this is going to be new baseline genoise recipe.  Also sorry for switching to grams from here on, I just always do cakes in metric
      7 whole eggs, extra large or "jumbo"
      3 egg yolks
      250 g sugar
      200 g whole wheat pastry flour
      50 g corn starch
      1 tsp ground ginger
      ½ tsp ground turmeric
      30 g butter, melted and warm but not hot
       
      Separate 3 eggs and reserve the whites. Add yolks to additional whole eggs and sugar and whip on medium-high speed for 8 minutes, until you have reached ribbon stage.  In the meantime, sift together dry ingredients, pre-heat your oven to 350˚F, and line two 9-inch tins with parchment.  Do not grease the tins as the cake needs to climb the sides of the pan.  Once eggs and sugar are whipped, add dry mix, one heaping tablespoon at a time, with mixer on lowest possible speed.  

      Once flour is almost completely incorporated, add a few dollops to butter and mix vigorously.  Add buttered batter to main batter and fold in with rubber spatula, being careful not to deflate the batter.  Once fully mixed in, split between two tins (roughly 500g mix each if using "jumbo" eggs).  Bake in the center of the oven for 30 minutes.  Remove, allow to cool for 10 minutes, and release by running offset spatula on outside to free from sides.  Invert cake, remove parchment, and place back on cooling rack to cool completely.

      When ready to use, split into 2 layers each, 4 layers total.  Brush each exposed side with milk (or simple syrup).
       
      This buttercream is special to me because I have been learning about confectionary lately, marshmallows in particular.  This was a recipe I developed that was inspired by marshmallow fluff + Italian meringue buttercream.  The idea of the barley malt syrup is that it has a strong, malty flavor that feels very ale-y when added to sharp ingredients like ginger.
      200 g barley malt syrup
      100 g water (I used ginger broth from crystallized ginger!)
      210 g sugar
      3 egg whites
      ½ tsp cream of tartar
      1 ½ tsp ground ginger
      ½ tsp ground turmeric
      ¼ tsp sea salt
      350 g butter, at room temperature
       
      Heat syrup, water and sugar over medium high heat and bring to a boil. Then, reduce to medium and bring temperature up to 118˚C (I got to about 115˚ and my pan started scorching, so I aborted there.  Try swirling the syrup every now and then and use a pan with quite high sides).  Once at temperature, remove from heat and whip eggs and cream of tartar until frothy.  Pour syrup into egg whites while on medium speed and then increase to medium-high speed to whip until room temperature. While whipping, add ginger, turmeric and salt.  Once cool, add butter 2 tbsp at a time on medium-low speed.  Stop mixer, scrape down sides, and whip on medium-high speed for 1-2 minutes until smooth.

       
      To assemble, place a small dollop of frosting on the cake stand and place one layer of sponge.  Make frosting border and fill with half the jam.  Place next sponge on top and using large ice cream scoop, add 3 scoops frosting to the top of the sponge.  Even out layer and take remaining frosting out to cake edges.  Place next layer on top, repeat border and jelly, and finish with the final cake layer.  Add 5 scoops to the top of the sponge and even out to thin layer, taking remaining frosting out to the edges and covering the sides.

      Once crumb coated, place in fridge for 20 minutes.  Then take out and frost with remaining buttercream.

      Smooth out sides and top of cake and adorn with candied ginger.

       

       
      Such a nice result and such a tasty cake.  Using milk as my soak has really improved the texture of the final sponge, which is super supple and moist.  I think 3 egg yolks might be the key to the cake being so moist.  It's a sturdy sponge with a tender crumb, and the turmeric actually calms the fury of the ground ginger and produces a very mellow fragrance that you smell right before you take a bite.

       
       
    • By pastrygirl
      What do you all think is the safety level of leaving raw shortbread out at warm room temp (75-80f) for 18 hours?  Assume no eggs, just butter, sugar, and flour.... 
       
      It will be baked, but I still fear that pathogens could grow. Or maybe it’s my years of pastry experience wherein cold dough has always been easier to handle and that’s why it seems so wrong. 😂
       
      (This is not my doing, I have a renter in my kitchen.)
       
       
    • By Galchic
      Hello, folks, thanks for reading.
       
      My husband thinks, I should start selling my popcorn seasonings (which I make for my family), it’s a good product. But I'm not sure if it’s interesting to other people... So, what do you think, guys?
       
      Our story: 
      We’ve bought an air popper machine, but popcorn came out pretty tasteless. Then, we’ve bought different “popcorn seasoning” mixes... But it always ends with all the seasoning at the bottom of the bowl. Then, we've added butter, oil and so on before seasoning...  we got soggy, chewy popcorn. Lot’s of disappointments…
       
      When we almost gave up… the magic happened! I figured out the way to make seasonings that:
      Stick to popcorn, but not sticky to fingers (or T-shirt  , Easy to apply, May be pre cooked in bulk and stored… And popcorn appears crunchy, tasty, thoroughly covered with seasoning.  
      Sounds good, yep? Now, when I want to treat myself  - I only need 2 mins to turn tasteless popped popcorn to a real treat.  
      The only moment - it request 1 extra effort: after you toss it over popcorn, you need to microwave it for 1 min, and stir after.
       
      So, I was wondering, if you like popcorn like myself - would this seasoning be interesting for you to purchase? Are you ready for a little extra work (microwave & stir) in the goal to flavor popcorn, or it feels too much effort?
       
      As I have no experience in manufacturing and retail, your answers would help me to make a very important decision - to dive in or not... 
       
      Thanks in advance for your answers, it means the world to me.
       
    • By pastrygirl
      My supplier decided that cocoa butter is now special order so I had to buy a case. And now I have an excessive amount of cocoa butter, anyone need any?  
       
      Cacao Barry cocoa butter pistoles with a best by date of April 2021   $66 for the 3 kg tub or $22 per kg plus shipping. 
       
       
    • By curls
      So, what is everyone doing for the pastry & baking side of Easter?
       
      I'm working on the following chocolates: fruit & nut eggs, hollow bunnies, Jelly Belly filled bunnies, coconut bunnies, dragons (filled with rice krispies & chocolate), peanut butter hedgehogs, and malted milk hens. Hoping to finish my dark chocolate production today and get started on all my milk chocolate items.
       
      My father-in-law will be baking the traditional family Easter bread a day or two before Easter. Its an enriched bread and he makes two versions -- one with raisins and one without (I prefer the one with raisins).
       

       
      And I was lucky enough to spot this couple in the sale moulds stock at last year's eGullet chocolate & confections workshop in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario. These love bunnies help so very much with Easter chocolate production!  ;-)

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...