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Darienne

Mozzarella: what to do with it?

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Ed, he who does the shopping now and always manages to floor me each time with what he buys 'extra', has bought way too much mozzarella.  Besides putting it on pizza or using it in Lasagne, how else can I work it into our lives?

Thanks. 


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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If you can find some decent hothouse tomatoes and some fresh basil, make a caprese salad or a variation thereof. If you like Italian subs, try some mozz instead of provolone.

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Posted (edited)

When you say mozzarella, what do you mean?  Did he bring home balls of the fresh stuff sitting in whey brine?  Did he get bricks of the dried stuff?  Bags of the shredded dried stuff?  Lots of things get called mozzarella commercially... knowing what you've got would help us come up with recommendations... 

 

 see e.g.: https://www.foodrepublic.com/2015/10/01/12-types-mozzarella-know-love-melt/ and https://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-deal-with-low-moisture-mozzarella-and-when-to-use-it-256664


Edited by cdh (log)
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Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

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Assuming the firmer brick type, it's pretty melty so how about a fondue or rarebit?  Bump up the seasonings since mozz is milder than gruyere or cheddar and/or add a small amount of something extra strong like Parmesan or blue.

 

Cold smoke some for variety if you're crafty that way.

 

Dog treats?

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If it is the firm block type mozz (ie, not the ball in brine) you can cut cubes and make mozz stuffed meatballs, or arancini. Neither uses a tremendous amount of cheese, but mozz (if in a sealed pack, I'm thinking of the stuff like Polly-O in the US) will keep for a while in the fridge if unopened.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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@cdh: oops.  Never thought of that.  It's simply the firm block style.  Thanks.

 

@pastrygirl:  Not much for fondues...but we do have two large always looking for a treat dogs.

 

@BeeZee:  I've already run it through the food processor for slices...Carpal Tunnel thingy...  Have to Google arancini...yes, it's that bad...

 

We use a lot of cheese and I have this wonderful cheese cracker from Williams Sonoma that I make regularly which can take a lot of different cheeses...but not Mozzarella.  We're not much for Mozzarella.  It's just not a favorite.   

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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You know, I think I could go for Arancini.  Sounds delicious.  Yes.  I'll make some.  Thanks, @BeeZee.

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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@Darienne, I’m sure you could tear up some of those slices and stack up the bits to make a larger mass to stuff the rice balls. Even if not perfect, they are tasty. A recipe born from using up leftovers.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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Some marinara to dip that arancini in does not go amiss....

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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45 minutes ago, oofencocotte said:

Can it be grilled like halloumi? 

don't think so - like I believe it'll turn stringy-e (like pizza cheese) 

 

something about the protein mesh structure that makes it non-ideal for melting cheese 

 

unlike ricotta (I believe) and some Latin frying cheese that's "coagulated?" with vinegar 

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"Hmmm....what would Don Quixote do?" 

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Keep it simple is the best and let the cheese come to room temperature.

 

Roast 1/4 inch slices of eggplant and tomatoes until the former is lightly browned and the latter is slightly shriveled. Stack with 1/4 inch slices of Mozzerella in alternate order. Top with a large basil leaf, drizzle with EVOO, salt and pepper - makes great spring/summer appetizer.

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Rich Schulhoff

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Posted (edited)
On 5/21/2019 at 4:54 PM, Darienne said:

@BeeZeeI've already run it through the food processor for slices...Carpal Tunnel thingy...  Have to Google arancini...yes, it's that bad...  

 

I don't know how long you plan on keeping it around for, but, in the future, if you want to prolong the shelf life, it's best to keep it in the packaging until you need it. Also, brick mozzarella is only as good as it's melt, and slices melt especially poorly- it's super easy to end up with rubbery tasteless cheese.  Even if you can't grate them by hand, I might put them back in the food processor for a handful of pulses on the chop setting.

 

I tend to have a lot mozzarella around and use it for any Mexican dishes that require melted cheese, like enchiladas.

 

It also fries up really well in a non stick pan.  Take it until golden brown and you'll get crunchy crackers when it cools.


Edited by scott123 (log)
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