Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
cutter

Proper knife motion when cutting meat?

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

when cutting meats is there a certain cutting motion you use with knife  for different cuts of meats. Been reading for meats you should pull back knife,but also seen push cut for some meats. Is there certain meats that require different cutting motions? If so could you explain? Example ,i have seen is chicken strips some use pull cut to slice into stripes and some use a push cut to slice into stripes.......why the difference.?


Edited by cutter (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I think i posted in the wrong section before so i am going to post it here again .sorry.

 

when cutting meats is there a certain cutting motion you use with knife  for different cuts of meats. Been reading for meats you should pull back knife,but also seen push cut for some meats. Is there certain meats that require different cutting motions? If so could you explain? Example ,i have seen is chicken strips some use pull cut to slice into stripes and some use a push cut to slice into stripes.......why the difference.?


Edited by Smithy Adjusted title for clarity (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one should only speak in generalities because  there all kinds of situations and variations....

 

thick pieces are quicker to handle with a push cut - you have more leverage.  start tip down, slice forward while pushing heel down.

 

thinner cuts are best done with a pull cut - if pushing the meat likes to run away from you.  sharp knife, tip down, slice on the pull - as need one can hold the far edge still.   sharp knife is more important in the pull than the push, but perhaps that's best expressed as 'sharper' - a dull knife is not a good start for meat cutting.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Often times a "chop" can be used, just place edge of knife on meat and push strongly with palm. Requires a sharp knife and a relatively thin piece of meat (<3/4 inch).

 

p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

really need help on this question. i have read thick pieces you should use a pull thats what butchers do. any advice would be appr.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Two different grips:  

 

This grip, for pull back is used for larger ANIMAL Dissection

 

47058322954_0c43469fb6_z.jpg

 

For a  smaller dissection..  I use the lower , but may change the hand or finger position, for primal cuts.  I have a fair amount of knives, for different applications, this is just one..  Just make sure your knives are sharp,  and use what is comfortable to u .  Like for chicken breasts

 

32903897897_debaff2596_z.jpg


Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the internet has many experts

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really hate seeing knife marks in meat sliced after cooking, eg a roast.

 

I have a looooong slicing knife that will go through a roast in 1 long pull leaving no knife ridges.

 

I use it when guests are eating.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this is what i found .....that is why i said pull cut.

Super Quick Video Tips: How Not to Mangle Your Meat when Portioning with a Chef's Knife

30,607 views
 
 
 
 
AGF-l78Tu8Uk7oBJ7rRvP7OyEahF3rP5E8NJSwH3
America's Test Kitchen
also at Stack exchange says Next, you should use the sharpest, narrowest, and longest blade that you have (those are in order of importance, so if your chef's knife is way sharper than your slicer, use it). Your knife should be sharp enough that you don't really have to press down at all in order to cut the meat -- the weight of the blade should be providing enough force. The cuts you make will be the same as if you were slicing a roast. Use the longest possible stroke, smoothly moving the entire length of your blade through the cut. Generally, cutting by starting at the base of the blade and pulling towards you will allow the smoothest movement. If you don't make it all the way through in one stroke, restart the cut from the base of the blade as many times as you need to, rather than following with a push cut. (On the last little bit, to completely separate the portion, you can get away with it, though.)               S ee all say pull. but say with  chicken i see push cut and pull cuts how does one decide what to use? Or with any meat how do you decide what cut  knife to use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, cutter said:

when cutting meats is there a certain cutting motion you use with knife  for different cuts of meats.

 

Only if you are a sushi chef.

 

dcarch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Only if you are a sushi chef.       the above test kitchen is not a sushi chef

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Japanese Culinary Academy has two volumes on the subject of Cutting Techniques:  Mukoita I and Mukoita II.  Not all cutting is sushi.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

so is best to cut all meat with a pull or draw cut. how does everyone else decide how they should cut meat basically


Edited by cutter (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're trying to reason your way into something that is a practice and a craft. Just go out and cut things and decide for yourself what works and what doesn't work with whatever knives you have on hand. There is no correct answer to the question you're trying to ask.

 

I would cut the same piece of meat differently depending on the knife and the purpose. If you're not sure what to do, experiment. Or if there's a specific piece of meat you're interested in cutting, look on YouTube. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, btbyrd said:

You're trying to reason your way into something that is a practice and a craft. Just go out and cut things and decide for yourself what works and what doesn't work with whatever knives you have on hand. There is no correct answer to the question you're trying to ask.

 

I would cut the same piece of meat differently depending on the knife and the purpose. If you're not sure what to do, experiment. Or if there's a specific piece of meat you're interested in cutting, look on YouTube. 

 

Exactly What I was trying to say. Except for sushi preparation, which requires the  right kind of knife used the right way for a specific kind of meat. 

 

dcarch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, dcarch said:

 

Exactly What I was trying to say. Except for sushi preparation, which requires the  right kind of knife used the right way for a specific kind of meat. 

 

dcarch

 

I treat everything like it's sushi, but I realize that I'm a bit of a spoiled weirdo in that regard. Honesuki for breaking down chicken; garasuki for turkey legs, hankotsu for deboning (also garasuki!), sujihiki for slicing raw and cooked protein, yanagiba for slicing raw fish. Raw fish slicing is a place where technique is very important, as the flesh is delicate and your technique can elevate or destroy fish flesh.

 

The same thing is true of slicing meat, but "doing it wrong" is usually much less obvious. Unless you do something like cut flank steak or tri tip (or something similar) with the grain and make a potentially tender cut stringy and chewy. Understanding the anatomy of the meat you're cutting can be very helpful in some instances. I've posted this video elsewhere on eGullet, but it shows the inherent difficulty carving a tri-tip roast across the grain for maximum tenderness. "Correct cutting motion" is less important when cutting a tri-tip than knowing where to make your cuts. A lot of good technique is in knowing where and why to cut, not just how.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/17/2019 at 5:22 PM, btbyrd said:

The same thing is true of slicing meat, but "doing it wrong" is usually much less obvious. Unless you do something like cut flank steak or tri tip (or something similar) with the grain and make a potentially tender cut stringy and chewy.

 

And then you get recipes like ropa vieja which make you look at flank steak and make you think 'how can I make this cut-o-meat more stringy".... xD Cutting meat, is like many things in life, common sense- but with clear goal in mind, one can throw even common sense out of the window. :D

 

I'm about to start cooking tonight- got m'self 5 lb of beef shank, part of it is going in tonight's goulash but majority is going into beef carrot daube tomorrow (I run into gournet friend of mine when grocery shopping and forgot to buy shallots- he got hold of russian kale and had to share recipe that makes it shine, then we discussed differences between 'regular' and 'golden' hake, then one thing lead to another and pints of stout were consumed and many things discussed while market sort of got closed on me :$). Digression aside, is there a better way to cut it into 'stew meat' than cut into 1/2" steaks and then cube them (fror goulash part- for daube, I'd go for 3/4" steaks and cubes)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×