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43 minutes ago, paulraphael said:

 

It does indeed.

 

But I bet it'll be over $1000. Pro-grade circulators don't come cheap and this write-up talks only about quality and durability, not price. I think that the polyscience is around $1500.

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I have had a Polyscience for 14 years.  Never a problem.  Looks like the day I bought it.  The plastic tank cracked but it was easily replaced.  But at $399, and if it is what they claim, then it will fly off the shelves.  I would wait or buy an extended warranty if available.

 

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I'm still waiting for the anova precision oven that was supposed to come out about 2 years ago.  It looked so promising (sleek design, steam cooking, searing plate, convection, etc), but I'm pretty sure that it's not going to happen since I haven't seen any mention of it in a long time..

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Polyscience makes great stuff, but I think their industrial design and their pricing are a decade out of date. If this new Anova lives up to its potential it will light a fire under PS's butt. 


Notes from the underbelly

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38 minutes ago, paulraphael said:

Polyscience makes great stuff, but I think their industrial design and their pricing are a decade out of date. If this new Anova lives up to its potential it will light a fire under PS's butt. 

 

Yup. Polyscience prices them like a lab circulator that will be paid for by an NIH grant...ie overpriced.

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From what I hear most restaurants that bought a circulator in the past few years went for the Anova (many cases more than 1), not PS.

I wonder if any Anova made its way in a lab.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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1 hour ago, teonzo said:

From what I hear most restaurants that bought a circulator in the past few years went for the Anova (many cases more than 1), not PS.

I wonder if any Anova made its way in a lab.

 

Isn't Anova a lab equipment maker too?  I thought I remembered hearing that when they introduced their first models way back when.

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Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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Posted (edited)

does the app on the Joule have a data-logger?


Edited by adey73 (log)

“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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44 minutes ago, cdh said:

Isn't Anova a lab equipment maker too?  I thought I remembered hearing that when they introduced their first models way back when.

 

Good question, never looked for this info, I always assumed they were only in the food market but it's just a personal assumption.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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13 hours ago, paulraphael said:

 

Meh.  0.05 degree precision?  Is that really better than 0.5 degree precision?  1200 Watts is less than an anemic toaster.  A better circulator?  OK, maybe useful in very large baths (Hint:  You can use two 800W Anovas, and have more power, more circulation, and money left over).

 

I'm convinced it's an improvement.  It's probably what they should have launched with.

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, cdh said:

 

Isn't Anova a lab equipment maker too?  I thought I remembered hearing that when they introduced their first models way back when.

 

Kinda sorta. Anova was originally a lab equipment company. After they developed their first culinary circulator, they spun off the division as Anova Culinary. This was later bought by Electrolux (but seems to remain independently run). For a minute there may have been some kind of relationship between Anova and Anova Culinary (the original Anova Pro culinary circulator was identical to the lab model). 

 

But now I can't find any evidence of the original company existing anymore. They're still listed on some lab suppliers' sites, but generally as unavailable. 

 

The wikipedia article on the company makes no reference to the original lab equipment company, which seems odd. 


Edited by paulraphael (log)
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Notes from the underbelly

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5 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

@Anova Jeff explained this to us way back when.  Myself, I'm wondering if the pro is part of the business unit sold to Electrolux or not.  And some of us are still waiting for Jeff to sail home from the south Pacific to design our oven.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

The dimensions are 1.29kg, 350mm tall, with a 60mm barrel. The barrel is the same size as the Anova One (so it will fit through the cooler lids and cambro lids I've cut out). And it's actually a bit smaller and lighter than the One. 

 

I plan to keep my One as long as it keeps chugging along ... but it's nice to know there's a high quality replacement if ever needed. 

 

My ideal kit would probably be an Anova Pro, plus a Nano for travel or for those rare times a 2nd circulator would be useful. 


Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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10 minutes ago, paulraphael said:

The dimensions are 1.29kg, 350mm tall, with a 60mm barrel. The barrel is the same size as the Anova One (so it will fit through the cooler lids and cambro lids I've cut out). And it's actually a bit smaller and lighter than the One. 

 

I plan to keep my One as long as it keeps chugging along ... but it's nice to know there's a high quality replacement if ever needed. 

 

My ideal kit would probably be an Anova Pro, plus a Nano for travel or for those rare times a 2nd circulator would be useful. 

 

 

Good to know.  My one shows no signs of old age but should it falter I wouldn't hesitate a minute, bank balance permitting.  I assume the new pro works just fine without WiFi.

 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/2/2019 at 12:32 AM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Good to know.  My one shows no signs of old age but should it falter I wouldn't hesitate a minute, bank balance permitting.  I assume the new pro works just fine without WiFi.

 

 

Cool article. I'd never heard of all those those drawbacks to lab circulators. In my brief experience the problems were size and price, and sometimes succumbing to steam. 

 

But the real takeaway ... there's such thing as a centrifugal evaporator. Am I the last to know?


Edited by paulraphael (log)
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Notes from the underbelly

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On 5/1/2019 at 11:57 PM, boilsover said:

 

Meh.  0.05 degree precision?  Is that really better than 0.5 degree precision?  1200 Watts is less than an anemic toaster.  A better circulator?  OK, maybe useful in very large baths (Hint:  You can use two 800W Anovas, and have more power, more circulation, and money left over).

 

I'm convinced it's an improvement.  It's probably what they should have launched with.

 

The value is that it's built for reliability. Restaurant kitchens have proven to be hard on circulators, even pro lab models, because the lab ones aren't designed to get kicked around by line cooks or to run all day in a steamy environment. 

 

For amateurs this model isn't necessary, but it offers extra peace of mind for just a $200 premium. It's not even bulky or heavy like the pro circulators of yore.


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Posted (edited)

We have two a polyscience one and a Nomiku.  Both have needed service.  The Polyscience runs great - cost 6x as much.  But seems to use larger tubes for the pumps etc.  The Nomiku is kinda a pain to use.

 

Nomiku told me to clean with dishwasher soap  - since it gets clogged up with hard water.  Never had to do that for the polyscience on in years (service issue was electrical, bad solder or something I found reported that was rather common).

 

Needless to say I'm going to question any cheap immersion circulator now.


Edited by Raamo (log)
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On 5/3/2019 at 7:44 PM, paulraphael said:

The value is that it's built for reliability.

 

Not exactly a ringing endorsement for previous models.  Either they are unreliable, or this one's superfluous, IMO.

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5 hours ago, boilsover said:

 

Not exactly a ringing endorsement for previous models.  Either they are unreliable, or this one's superfluous, IMO.

No.  10K hours continuous use is entirely different from how the consumer models are intended to be used. 

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18 hours ago, dscheidt said:

No.  10K hours continuous use is entirely different from how the consumer models are intended to be used. 

 

Exactly. Companies offer different value propositions for different categories of customer. Not many years back, a circulator designed for constant professional use cost $1100. Then you could get one for $700. Now $400, without any apparent compromises. 

 

It's amazing that for $140 to $200 we can get a circulator that will do anything you'd ever need one to do. But we know we're buying a piece of consumer gear, and so don't expect it to take professional abuse, or to have anything like 3-sigma quality control certification. 

 

My consumer Anova has worked without a problem for over 5 years. But when it's time to replace it, I MAY decide that some extra piece of mind is worth an extra $200. It's nice to have the option.

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Notes from the underbelly

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