Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
eglies

Caramel bonbon leaking

Recommended Posts

Anyone can help why this is happening to my caramel bonbon after I scrape? They are not very full and it happened to almost all of them 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How long did you wait between adding your filling and capping your molds? Was there enough time for a "skin" to form on the caramel?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

your chocolate is squeezing the filling as it contracts. did you leave the shells to contract before adding the filling? Caramels are a pain in the butt 😛

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes we did overnight at 14 degrees fridge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did they warm to room temp before closing?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I am sealing bonbons containing caramel, just before pouring the melted chocolate over the top of the mold, I pass a heat gun back and forth a few times over the top of the mold. I hold the gun (actually in this case a hair dryer) far enough above the mold so as not to melt the chocolate very much. The theory is that the heat slightly softens the edges of the bonbons so that the chocolate you are about to pour will bond more securely to the bonbon sides. I'm not entirely sure it works, but it seems to have lessened the leaking problem for me. Another thing I do is to take the caramel to a slightly higher temperature than "soft-ball" stage. It makes piping more difficult, but it also makes the caramel less runny and therefore less prone to leak out. If a filling is fluid, the laws of nature dictate that it will try to find a way to escape, and shells often have nearly invisible pinholes in them.

 

And ultimately, if all else fails, you can try this (which works when the bonbons are still in the mold or have already been unmolded):  Temper some chocolate and cut some small pieces of acetate. Then use a knife to spread some chocolate over the bottom of the finished bonbon that is leaking. Apply the acetate, let the chocolate set, then remove the acetate. It doesn't usually make for a very pretty bottom, but we can't all have pretty bottoms. 😉

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I always do an extra ‘beauty coat” or two to (try to) get my bottoms perfect. I won’t claim that my bonbons never leak, but another coat to fill in any thin spots may help. 


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Then use a knife to spread some chocolate over the bottom of the finished bonbon that is leaking.

Thank you for this information. I did not know that people do it, I thought that it was just me and my poor chocolate skills, because this is what I had to do when I had a similar problem. The bottoms ended up thicker than I would like, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Besides what all the others wrote, I suppose it's also a scraping problem. The caps in the photos are a bit too wavy, sign that you did not make a single firm scrape. If you scrape more than once, then most probably you are not cleaning the scraper between one pass and the other, so it will form some small holes along the caps, especially on the cavity sides. Similar if your hand is not firm and your movement is not precise. As far as I understand you are at the beginning of this adventure, so it's pretty normal to make these little mistakes, as you gain experience you'll get cleaner caps.

 

 

 

Teo

 

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

I always do an extra ‘beauty coat” or two to (try to) get my bottoms perfect. I won’t claim that my bonbons never leak, but another coat to fill in any thin spots may help. 

 

Do you wait until the first coat sets before adding additional ones, or do you add one immediately after the previous?


Edited by Jim D. (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Do you wait until the first cost sets before adding additional ones, or do you add one immediately after the previous?

 

Wait until it sets and contracts, then fill in the gaps. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run a hairdryer over the mould before capping. Then once the capping chocolate is poured, place a acetate sheet over the mould and use the scraper to scrape out excess chocolate from under the sheet and leave to set. I have no issues with my home made Isle of Skye Sea Salt salted caramel.Apart from when I overfill lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By eglies
      I have just started my own chocolaterie. We opened two weeks ago, we are only online business. It’s 15 days before Easter here. I have produced Bonbons but don’t know if it’s enough. I have budgeted for this but nobody can tell me how it will go right? I’m scared we won’t cope with last minute orders that week...
    • By tinyragebaking
      Hi everyone! 

      I  lurk more often than post but I love this website! I've been dabbling in making bon bons and I wanted to ask if anybody here knew of any couverture dairy-free chocolates? One of my good friends is getting married and I would love to surprise her with some bon bons, but she has a severe allergy to caesin (so much so that if there's cross contamination with other food, she risks going to anaphylactic shock).  I'd appreciate any help or suggestions

      Here's a photo of some of the stuff I've been having fun with.  I did from left to right an olive oil and thyme center, raspberry and green tea, and blueberry ginger! 

       

    • By curls
      So, what is everyone doing for the pastry & baking side of Easter?
       
      I'm working on the following chocolates: fruit & nut eggs, hollow bunnies, Jelly Belly filled bunnies, coconut bunnies, dragons (filled with rice krispies & chocolate), peanut butter hedgehogs, and malted milk hens. Hoping to finish my dark chocolate production today and get started on all my milk chocolate items.
       
      My father-in-law will be baking the traditional family Easter bread a day or two before Easter. Its an enriched bread and he makes two versions -- one with raisins and one without (I prefer the one with raisins).
       

       
      And I was lucky enough to spot this couple in the sale moulds stock at last year's eGullet chocolate & confections workshop in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario. These love bunnies help so very much with Easter chocolate production!  ;-)

    • By eglies
      hi everyone, 
       
      Another problem occurred with our caramel recipe for our bonbons. I had a perfect texture using my recipe for 32 cavities and when I multiplied that by 2 the caramel was a completely different texture and very runny.
       
      Any suggestions why this happened?
      Thank you
    • By Jim D.
      I have an opportunity to obtain (without a trip to NYC, where everything appears available) some hard-to-find liqueurs or brandies for my chocolate work, primarily in ganaches. I already have a poire Williams eau-de-vie and a framboise one as well. I have German kirschwasser but am getting low on that, so am thinking of getting more while I have this chance. For new ones, I'm thinking primarily of apricot. I have heard there are some wonderful European apricot brandies/liqueurs, but don't know which really taste of apricots and are worth purchasing. And the other flavor I would like is a strawberry brandy or liqueur. Online I've found Dolceterra Marcati wild strawberries liqueur and Drillaut strawberry liqueur but know nothing about either. I lean more toward a liqueur/cordial than eau-de-vie because sometimes I think the latter does not always taste specifically of the fruit.
       
      Any guidance would be much appreciated, including ideas for fruits I haven't mentioned.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×