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Balancing bonbon recipes

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I need some help to balance my recipe fillings for my bonbons. Anyone have time to help me? I have based myself on Ramon Moratos %

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I have the spread sheet the problem is that how much sugar, sorbitol, dry ingredients do you add to balance it out, . Playing around with it gives me weird quantities. I really need someone who would be able to see it and tell me you need to add this and that and you will be fine. My recipes are very simple.

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You are asking for something that people do for a living. Chocolatiers who explain these details do so in classes or consulting jobs that cost thousands of dollars. Unfortunately we do not live in a fairytale, people who gain knowledge after years of hard work are not supposed to give it away for free to anyone.

Best thing you can do is buying "Fine Chocolates: Gold" by Wybauw and study it from cover to cover, then decide if it's the case to invest money in a class with Melissa Coppel or other professionals that have that kind of knowledge.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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I'm trying to plug a few things into the spreadsheet this evening and I realize that the white chocolate (chocovic opal) appears to contain no milk fat. Unless it's made with nonfat skim milk powder - seems odd there would be none. I'm also discovering how difficult it is to find spec sheets on various chocolates.

 

 

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10 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

I'm trying to plug a few things into the spreadsheet this evening and I realize that the white chocolate (chocovic opal) appears to contain no milk fat. Unless it's made with nonfat skim milk powder - seems odd there would be none. I'm also discovering how difficult it is to find spec sheets on various chocolates.

 

 

That is a good example of why I have never been able to use the spreadsheet. There are so many variables and the makeup of the various ingredients is often impossible to find or calculate. Rob was going to talk about balancing ganaches at this year's workshop, but I understand he did not have time to do that.

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There is a program called Ganache Solutions - running a trial version of it to see what it’s about.  As far as I can tell it’s a glorified version of the spreadsheet but has all the values on there.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

There is a program called Ganache Solutions - running a trial version of it to see what it’s about.  As far as I can tell it’s a glorified version of the spreadsheet but has all the values on there.

 

 

I for one look forward to seeing your evaluation.

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I just checked out the program. At 799 euros, it should be very balanced indeed! (I realize it's only 50 euros after the first year.)

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As far as I know the first program for balancing ganache recipes was/is Pro-Choc. I thought it was included in the book "Ganache – l'art et l'expertise" by Jean-Pierre Richard, just checked and Librairie Gourmande says I was mistaken: the book explains how to use the program, but the CD-ROM does not contain it, it has only advertising pdfs. The real Pro-Choc is still updated constantly and for sale, but for much higher price. Can't comment on the qualities of any of these programs, never tried.

Seems like what happened with the program for balancing ice-cream recipes by Angelo Corvitto: his one was the first and the most expensive, then others followed and took "inspiration".

One important thing to remember is that the method used for realizing a ganache has a sensible impact on its qualities (Aw, smoothness, so on), this was clearly pointed out by Frédéric Bau with his method of voluntarily breaking the emulsion. So programs like this one will just give an overall view for the recipe, not the perfect final numbers.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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Good to know, thanks.

I've always been skeptical on these kind of programs for ganaches, can't see much value in them. Since it's possible to create a new recipe from an existing and working one, and it does not take much effort, then I always preferred that way.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Teo

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On 5/27/2019 at 9:24 AM, Jim D. said:

I just checked out the program. At 799 euros, it should be very balanced indeed! (I realize it's only 50 euros after the first year.)

So I got this today - 

 

 

 

Happy World Chocolate Day!

 
 

Here we are!

The promo code is now online and you have only 48 hours to get your Ganache Solution license at half-price. 

Use the code: CHOCODAY to purchase Ganache Solution at € 399 instead of € 799*.

The code will be effective until 23:59 on 8 July. So don't miss the chance!

Get Ganache Solution at 50% off
ba750382-782a-4654-bd20-3d40680941fa.png
*Starting from the second year, we require only a 50€/year maintenance fee.

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Posted (edited)

Jim, I couldn't get in to the parts of the program (read - the instructions) that I needed to from the trial version so wasn't able to properly evaluate it. 

 

I did decide to bite the bullet and give it a try though for half price. I think it will be a valuable program in my role as shelf life tutor for Ecole Chocolat. It was late last night when I first had a look - so I'm not really up to speed on it. It would appear that it gives you a range of suggested sugar, cocoa butter fat, butter fat, dry substances and liquid for a molded vs a cut piece in milk, white and dark. When you are writing a recipe and you want to see how it compares to a standard you can do so. It will show you the effect of your tweeks on the components. It doesn't generate an available water.

 

I will have to play with it more - but it also apparently allows you to use something called 'set temperature' where the software recognizes a cooking process for an ingredient (like caramel) and if you can enter the temperature to which it was cooked it will recalculate the reduction of liquids and reset the value of sugar, fats and other solids.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

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On 7/7/2019 at 4:10 AM, Kerry Beal said:

I did decide to bite the bullet and give it a try though for half price. I think it will be a valuable program in my role as shelf life tutor for Ecole Chocolat. It was late last night when I first had a look - so I'm not really up to speed on it. It would appear that it gives you a range of suggested sugar, cocoa butter fat, butter fat, dry substances and liquid for a molded vs a cut piece in milk, white and dark. When you are writing a recipe and you want to see how it compares to a standard you can do so. It will show you the effect of your tweeks on the components. It doesn't generate an available water.

 

I recently attended the Glossy Bonbons and Ganache Formulations workshop at Melissa Coppel's school, and the last two days were taught by Bourdeaux.  After spending a morning discussing the theory of ganache (emulsions, the role of each ingredient in ganache, etc.), we were split into teams.  Bourdeaux would specify a particular type of ganache for each team to make, and we would formulate it in Ganache Solution.  In total, we made four types of ganache, including ones for molded bonbons, enrobing, and vegan.  Once he approved our recipe, we would prepare a batch of ganache, taste it, test the AW, and use it in its desired function.  In some cases the recipes were borderline on paper / could potentially have some issues (too soft, too hard, not enough flavor, etc.), but he would have us proceed with the recipe as is so we could see what would happen.  Afterwards, we would reformulate and remake the ganache to obtain a better result.  On the last day of class, everyone gathered around a table and we sampled and evaluated the ganaches, trying to look at each objectively.  Could we taste the specified flavor?  Was the texture appropriate for its purpose?  It was incredible seeing some of the creativity from my classmates, with the winner for originality certainly going to a Tikka Masala ganache!  It certainly lived up to the designated flavor, with an almost too intense curry punch upon an initial tasting, but actually mellowed out to a very nice flavor at the end of a bite.

 

I found it quite interesting how something that looked to be good on paper, did not necessarily go completely to plan in practice.  In fact, this was one of the points Bourdeaux hammered home to us- that while useful, any set of guidelines is just a starting point and the only way to know for sure whether or not something will work is to actually test it.  I only heard this discussion between Bourdeaux and another student in passing, but I believe this is one of the reasons AW is not included in Ganache Solution.  While I'm just starting to dip my feet into the chocolatier world, I ended up purchasing the program, because as one of my classmates astutely pointed out, it can also be used to easily scale up/down any recipe, or track changes as you make small tweaks to a recipe.

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