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scott123

scott123

6 hours ago, Paul Bacino said:

 

@Kim Shook--    serious eats has info on cooking Detroit style/  that I'm looking at      /   I have cooked pizza in a cast iron pan and  it ain't bad.   

 

 

Kenji is a valuable resource in some areas, but he knows very little about pizza.  If you're looking to do research, I"d hit up pizzamaking.com long before seriouseats.  You'll most likely get some different opinions, but the net takeaway will be head and shoulders beyond seriouseats.  Seriouseats is  ONLY for people making their very first pizza.  If you're trying to tackle Iron Born, you need both good intermediate and advanced direction.

 

Pizzamaking.com member 'Hotsawce' helped develop Emmy Squared's recipe, one of the top Detroit places in NY.  Whatever advice he gives you, follow it.

 

Detroit and cast iron pan pizza are very different animals.  Detroit is typically puffier because of the superior conductivity of the thinner steel (or aluminum).  Trust me on this, you will never match Iron Born with a cast iron pan.

 

I'm seeing articles mention Iron Born baking on steel decks as well.  This isn't the steel plate that home pizza makers use, but it is a stone deck oven analog.  You will most likely want to bake on a hearth, maybe stone, maybe steel. I would try stone first, if you have it, and see how the bottom turns out.

 

Iron Born uses the traditional brick cheese, so you're going to want to track that down.

 

They also use organic flour.  Sperry flour (General Mills) is popular in the industry.  That's what I'd put my money on.  Central Milling is popular, but these don't feel like your typical Central Milling fan boys. If you track down Sperry, make sure it's the higher protein version (12%).  If it is Sperry, you might be able to get away with Heckers (11.8% protein).  You do NOT want Kenji's 73% hydration with Heckers.  I would say 70%, maybe less. A video of Iron Born topping pizzas would be nice, but, I can't find one.

 

Edit: Fixed incorrect reference regarding cheese.

scott123

scott123

7 minutes ago, Paul Bacino said:

 

@Kim Shook--    serious eats has info on cooking Detroit style/  that I'm looking at      /   I have cooked pizza in a cast iron pan and  it ain't bad.   

 

 

Kenji is a valuable resource in some areas, but he knows very little about pizza.  If you're looking to do research, I"d hit up pizzamaking.com long before seriouseats.  You'll most likely get some different opinions, but the net takeaway will be head and shoulders beyond seriouseats.  Seriouseats is  ONLY for people making their very first pizza.  If you're trying to tackle Iron Born, you need both good intermediate and advanced direction.

 

Pizzamaking.com member 'Hotsawce' helped develop Emmy Squared's recipe, one of the top Detroit places in NY.  Whatever advice he gives you, follow it.

 

Detroit and cast iron pan pizza are very different animals.  Detroit is typically puffier because of the superior conductivity of the thinner steel (or aluminum).  Trust me on this, you will never match Iron Born with a cast iron pan.

 

I'm seeing articles mention Iron Born baking on steel decks as well.  This isn't the steel plate that home pizza makers use, but it is a stone deck oven analog.  You will most likely want to bake on a hearth, maybe stone, maybe steel. I would try stone first, if you have it, and see how the bottom turns out.

 

https://www.nextpittsburgh.com/eatdrink/pittsburghs-pizza-scene-perfect-mix-old-new/

 

"Much like Iron Born, they use a longer fermentation process for the dough, baking pies using the same square metal pans with a few traditional touches from their days growing up in Michigan: Stanislaus plum tomatoes, small “cupping” pepperoni and whole milk mozzarella."

 

Iron Born is not the traditional brick cheese.  This means that you're going to want a quality brand of aged mozzarella- which you're not going to find in a supermarket.  I'm not sure what distributors you have at your disposal, but you're going to want to try to track down some wholesale cheese.

 

They also use organic flour.  Sperry flour (General Mills) is popular in the industry.  That's what I'd put my money on.  Central Milling is popular, but these don't feel like your typical Central Milling fan boys. If you track down Sperry, make sure it's the higher protein version (12%).  If it is Sperry, you might be able to get away with Heckers (11.8% protein).  You do NOT want Kenji's 73% hydration with Heckers.  I would say 70%, maybe less. A video of Iron Born topping pizzas would be nice, but, I can't find one.

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