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Ader1

Ader1

6 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

He isn't keeping it secret. I asked him. He showed me. More than once. From start to lunch.

 

And you don't know what I know.

 

Why are they using Peng hui in the Noodle School?  They would surely teach them the proper way as schools usually do before they then used Peng Hui in order to cut corners.  That's usually how education works.  The fact is, they all use Peng Hui or something similar. 

 

I was taught how to hand pull noodles when I was in China a few years ago now.  And I was told by the La Mian chef that you needed Peng hui if you were doing it commercially.  Otherwise, you would be spending a long time kneading and pulling a small amount which would be white in colour and would disintegrate in boiling water.  There may be substitutes out there.  I brought some back to the UK with me and I sent it to my local authority who in turn sent it off to some central UK lab to analyse it's constituents.  It came back has having some ingredient which wasn't allowed under EU regulations to be used in food for human consumption.  I hve the report on my computer somewhere.  I have seen a La Mian chef on UK tv and the dough he has worked with obviously has some agent which relaxes it.   It looks different and it behaves differently.  I have been in touch with a couple of La Mian restaurants in other countries and they too were using Peng Hui imported from China.  Baking soda I believe has some of the qualities and I think it will make the dough stronger and not disintegrate in boiling water but I'm not sure.  I think it may also make it more yellow in colour.  But it has nowhere near the effect that Peng Hui has on dough.  I don't care what you claim your local La Mian chef does.  Because what you claim is nonsense.

Ader1

Ader1

6 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

He isn't keeping it secret. I asked him. He showed me. More than once. From start to lunch.

 

And you don't know what I know.

 

Why are they using Peng hui in the Noodle School. 

 

I was taught how to hand pull noodles when I was in China a few years ago now.  And I was told by the La Mian chef that you needed Peng hui if you were doing it commercially.  Otherwise, you would be spending a long time kneading and pulling a small amount which would be white in colour and would disintegrate in boiling water.  There may be substitutes out there.  I brought some back to the UK with me and I sent it to my local authority who in turn sent it off to some central UK lab to analyse it's constituents.  It came back has having some ingredient which wasn't allowed under EU regulations to be used in food for human consumption.  I hve the report on my computer somewhere.  I have seen a La Mian chef on UK tv and the dough he has worked with obviously has some agent which relaxes it.   It looks different and it behaves differently.  I have been in touch with a couple of La Mian restaurants in other countries and they too were using Peng Hui imported from China.  Baking soda I believe has some of the qualities and I think it will make the dough stronger and not disintegrate in boiling water but I'm not sure.  I think it may also make it more yellow in colour.  But it has nowhere near the effect that Peng Hui has on dough.  I don't care what you claim your local La Mian chef does.  Because what you claim is nonsense.

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