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Food of Appalachia


Martin Fisher
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BTW:

The dormant evergreen is mountain laurel, Pennsylvania's state flower.

The tracks are bobcat.

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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  • 1 month later...

A new addition!

Smoke, Roots, Mountain, Harvest

Lots of contemporary recipes mixed in but appears to be a good cookbook.

 

 

SMoke.JPG

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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I love the cover. My apartment block is on a hillside that once would have been homesteaded; among the apple trees growing untended all around me is one that produces small, beautiful apples with a bright pink interior like those. They're slightly tannic for eating out of hand (I suspect they were originally intended as cider apples) but lent a delicate rose hue to my applesauce this past fall.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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8 hours ago, chromedome said:

I love the cover. My apartment block is on a hillside that once would have been homesteaded; among the apple trees growing untended all around me is one that produces small, beautiful apples with a bright pink interior like those. They're slightly tannic for eating out of hand (I suspect they were originally intended as cider apples) but lent a delicate rose hue to my applesauce this past fall.

 

I love the dedication: "For you, Mom. You were right All Along. xD

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
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  • 8 months later...

I enjoyed this article, and know that a number of members here share aspects of this history:

 

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/what-is-appalachian-food?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=atlas-page&fbclid=IwAR2J4o548s5_6DceAD7-7APDlW0pW2JK1OQHvNMt4MwAhQyLckABh0wPhm4

 

And -- for all I know, Travis Milton is a member here.  In which case -- kudos.  Your work is inspiring.  And those "leather britches" are intriguing.  

Edited by SLB (log)
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  • 9 months later...
On 1/22/2020 at 9:11 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

With all respect, my father was Cherokee, born in the 1800's.  This culture was something to be escaped from.

 

 

On 1/28/2020 at 4:27 AM, Tri2Cook said:


I don't know your age and I'm not gonna ask but... wow. I have to go all the way back to great-grandparents to get to the 1800's and I am not young.

It all depends on the span of generations.    My grandfather fought in the (American) Civil War.   He didn't have my father until late in life.    My father didn't have me until he was almost 50.   So my SON, now in his 50s, can even point to a grandfather born in the 1800s.  

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eGullet member #80.

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2 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

 

It all depends on the span of generations.    My grandfather fought in the (American) Civil War.   He didn't have my father until late in life.    My father didn't have me until he was almost 50.   So my SON, now in his 50s, can even point to a grandfather born in the 1800s.  

Yeah, my late wife and I were only 9 years apart, but her mother and my grandmother were both born in 1914.

...and of course there's the famous example of the 10th POTUS, John Tyler, who still has one living grandson.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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  • 7 months later...

Before my Dad and them had proper refrigeration and freezing.

They used to just let meat hang in the shed all winter (mostly deer), cutting off some as needed.

I wanted that, but then I met people.

Love is toxic and it'll destroy your dreams.

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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I’m not from Appalachia, but my ancestors about four generations back were. They brought much of the culture with them, including the food. So, yes, I’m familiar with greasy beans, even though we canned them rather than dried them, and cured ham and bacon in the smokehouse. A true Appalachian meal is a feast!

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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