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Darienne

Darienne


I am undone. I misspelled the form of 'its' I needed.

On 1/28/2019 at 11:51 AM, DiggingDogFarm said:

I have a keen interest in the food culture of Appalachia.

I'll start this topic off with this:

In 2011, researchers at Slow Food’s RAFT Alliance documented 1,412 distinctly named heirloom foods in the region, including more than 350 varieties of apples, 464 varieties of peas and 31 kinds of corn.*

 

* Links to a PDF file.

OMG. OMG.  Thank you DDF.  I've noted before that we have a number of undefined types of apples on our farm (which was originally two separate 50-acres pieces).  We also have several patches of rhubarb and used to have asparagus also.  Found an asparagus plant growing in one of the bean fields last summer and have transplanted it with hope in my heart.  The original asparagus got wiped out during our house renovations without my knowledge at the time.  We don't eat rhubarb so I don't know its current state.  I'll check in the spring.  And yes, I tried to give it away. 

I could get only one person to pick wild grapes this last fall when we got a bumper (BUMPER) crop.  I had it much broadcast.  We are alas running out of jelly.  I should have made more.  We are not jelly eaters...but this stuff was incredible of course.

 

Added:  We live in east central Ontario, about 100 miles from Toronto.

 

Darienne

Darienne

34 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

I have a keen interest in the food culture of Appalachia.

I'll start this topic off with this:

In 2011, researchers at Slow Food’s RAFT Alliance documented 1,412 distinctly named heirloom foods in the region, including more than 350 varieties of apples, 464 varieties of peas and 31 kinds of corn.*

 

* Links to a PDF file.

OMG. OMG.  Thank you DDF.  I've noted before that we have a number of undefined types of apples on our farm (which was originally two separate 50-acres pieces).  We also have several patches of rhubarb and used to have asparagus also.  Found an asparagus plant growing in one of the bean fields last summer and have transplanted it with hope in my heart.  The original asparagus got wiped out during our house renovations without my knowledge at the time.  We don't eat rhubarb so I don't know it's current state.  I'll check in the spring.  And yes, I tried to give it away. 

I could get only one person to pick wild grapes this last fall when we got a bumper (BUMPER) crop.  I had it much broadcast.  We are alas running out of jelly.  I should have made more.  We are not jelly eaters...but this stuff was incredible of course.

 

Added:  We live in east central Ontario, about 100 miles from Toronto.

 

Darienne

Darienne

29 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

I have a keen interest in the food culture of Appalachia.

I'll start this topic off with this:

In 2011, researchers at Slow Food’s RAFT Alliance documented 1,412 distinctly named heirloom foods in the region, including more than 350 varieties of apples, 464 varieties of peas and 31 kinds of corn.*

 

* Links to a PDF file.

OMG. OMG.  Thank you DDF.  I've noted before that we have a number of undefined types of apples on our farm (which was originally two separate 50-acres pieces).  We also have several patches of rhubarb and used to have asparagus also.  Found an asparagus plant growing in one of the bean fields last summer and have transplanted it with hope in my heart.  The original asparagus got wiped out during our house renovations without my knowledge at the time.  We don't eat rhubarb so I don't know it's current state.  I'll check in the spring.  And yes, I tried to give it away. 

I could get only one person to pick wild grapes this last fall when we got a bumper (BUMPER) crop.  I had it much broadcast.  We are alas running out of jelly.  I should have made more.  We are not jelly eaters...but this stuff was incredible of course.

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