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DiggingDogFarm

Fermentation Inspiration......

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Finished crankraut that includes cranberries (of course,) red cabbage, the zest of two oranges and a little reduced orange and cranberry juice.

I like to slightly back-sweeten my krauts and the like.

Not enough to make them sweet, but just enough to take the edge off the sourness—for balance.

 

Crankraut.jpg


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I didn't realize how much those plates look like paper plates until I started photographing them. xD

It is a glass plate.

I got a brand spankin' new complete set of Martha Stewart dinnerware (Made in France) at the Salvation Army thrift store—only $8.00!!!

 

 

 

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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8 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

The semi-quick Boerhaave method of making vinegar.

I may give this a try using saturated bamboo skewers.

"Quickly Make Vinegar: The Semi-Quick Process for Making Vinegar (The Boerhaave Process)"

 

I've decided to give this a try.

Fresh sugar maple twigs will provide the surface area—I just finished peeling the bark off with a vegetable peeler, cutting them to size and sanitizing them.

This will be a wide mouth quart jar experiment—beer vinegar ( just cheap beer this time.)

It's actually two experiments as I'll be using Aldi's SimplyNature Unfiltered, Unpasteurized, Organic Apple Cider Vinegar.

It contains an actual REAL mother!!!

Backslopping with a little bit of vinegar.

csm_010616_S_48823_SPN_Organic_AppleCide

Source: ALDI, Inc.

 

Wish me luck! :)

  • Like 1

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I think I'll wait until tomorrow before I transfer to the second jar.

I've got an idea on how to increase surface area SUBSTANTIALLY!!! nasty.gif

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I just decanted November's kimchi, and it's 👌. I'm about to strain a bunch of last summer's vinegars: chili, black currant, and rhubarb. I also need to check on various misos and koji concoctions from the fall, which range from more liquid shoyu-hot sauce type things to thicker pastes. The chestnut miso is really good, and the grilled eggplant purée fermented with koji is INSANE. The liquid off the top of it is even better!

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Beer vinegar via the Boerhaave Process—started Sunday, February 3rd.

It's definitely already started to turn vinegary.


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I'm going to be making some Caerphilly cheese using some kicked-up cultured buttermilk as the starter culture—an experiment.

Caerphilly is great cheese in that it's "ripe" and ready to go in only about 3 weeks.

 

@andiesenji I know you like Caerphilly.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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On 2/3/2019 at 8:34 AM, DiggingDogFarm said:

The semi-quick Boerhaave method of making vinegar.

I may give this a try using saturated bamboo skewers.

"Quickly Make Vinegar: The Semi-Quick Process for Making Vinegar (The Boerhaave Process)"

 

It definitely went full vinegar relatively quickly using this simple method!

  • Like 1

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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On 2/16/2019 at 7:51 PM, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

It definitely went full vinegar relatively quickly using this simple method!

 

I should have and could have started a new batch, but, wow—now a very nice mother has formed.

Maybe I'll start a new batch tomorrow.


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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2 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

I should have and could have started a new batch, but, wow—now a very nice mother has formed.

Maybe I'll start a new batch tomorrow.

What size are your batches?

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1 minute ago, DesertTinker said:

What size are your batches?

 

The first batch of this experiment was/is quart size.

The second will probably be the same.

I will prep some longer sticks for 1/2 gallon batches at some point.


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I'm giving the kefir a rest for the first time ever—froze the grains.

I'm going to experiment with "heirloom" mesophilic (room temperature) yogurt cultures.

First up—Filmjölk

 

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I made a hard cheese roughly 4 weeks ago using kefir as a starter and rennet as a coagulant.

It was an impromptu experiment.

I have the patience and attention span of a gnat so I couldn't wait to sample it!

I sampled it yesterday and was surprised at how complex the flavor is for a cheese that's so young and not aged properly or for any great length of time—I don't currently have the "cheese cave" set up.

I vac packed it and kept it in the fridge after pressing.

The flavor is slightly tart and is reminiscent of a melding of Cheddar and Parmesan.

I think it's very good!

The texture is relatively dry, so it would make a great grating cheese, but it's not at all bad when sliced very thin.

I'm sure it would have been excellent if it had been aged properly.

Maybe I'll do it "right" next time! :laugh:

 

 

 

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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3 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

Maybe I'll do it "right" next time! :laugh:

 

Next time you just need to make 10, so there will be small chances that a couple of them will survive enough.

 

Can you post some photos of this experiment?

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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