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DiggingDogFarm

Fermentation Inspiration......

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3 minutes ago, THS said:

Noma does that in the book for most lactic fermented foods

 

I need to get to readin' the book! :)


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I have read not to let it go above 27 degrees in a storage space, but what about too cold?  I have a cold cellar that gets to between 5-10 degrees in winter...too cold?

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1 hour ago, TicTac said:

5-10 degrees in winter

 

That should be okay.

I've kept it in the fridge and it's actually continued to sour at fridge temperatures—very slowly, of course!


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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In the basement itself I would say it is between 20-24

 

Which environment is more ideal?

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8 minutes ago, TicTac said:

In the basement itself I would say it is between 20-24

 

Which environment is more ideal?

 

Cool and dark.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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29 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

Cool and dark.

 

Ok - thanks.

 

Moved to the cellar!

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I’ve lacto fermented hot peppers and fennel in a vacuum bag. 2% salt plus the vegetable and vacuum. It’ll ferment at room temp but somewhat slowly. I did it at 80F and they were ready in about 7 days. 

Super delicious. 

The noma book really is good. 

 

Just started 36oz if Tropicalia IPA, 20ml grain alcohol and 216g of brags vinegar to make beer vinegar. Should be tasty. 

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FWIW, here's a free resource that I used to cite frequently—there are more if I can find them.

FERMENTED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES—A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE.


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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8 hours ago, TicTac said:

How long do you typically let it ferment for?

 

Sorry I missed your question until now.

I'm usually not in a hurry to see it finish.

In the conditions in which I ferment sauerkraut, I'd say that I let it ferment an average of about 6 weeks.

YMMV

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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14 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

FWIW, here's a free resource that I used to cite frequently—there are more if I can find them.

FERMENTED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES—A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE.

There is also A Field Guide to Fermentation by Arielle Johnson and Lars Williams which is basically the predecessor of Noma Guide to Fermentation and describes the topics that are nearly the same but less detailed very well.

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This 150+ page theses, though dated, has some good information on pepper sauce fermentation and aging:

Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Pepper Mash and Hot Pepper Sauce.

 

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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The kombucha has been started, y'all!!! yes.gif


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I've read a little bit of the book.

I think it's excellent!

I love the writing style!

 

I like that they use weights rather than volume measurements—I think that's extremely important both for consistency and safety.

 

I do wish that they'd offered more detail about pathogens, especially the ones that are capable of reproducing at a relatively low pH!

Listeria monocytogenes makes me especially nervous—I've seen death by listeriosis, it's a HORRIBLE way to die!

 

Mention of the use of a plastic bag full of water as a weight/seal seems like a good idea, but there's a risk of ruining a fermentable if the bag leaks!!!

Don't ask me how I know! :laugh:

Using 2% brine in the bag, rather than water, is MUCH better practice.

 

They don't mention the weight—in mils— of the vacuum pouches that they're using, or many other details.

The major problem that I had when fermenting in bags when I had the bokashi composting website and was doing frequent demonstrations was very slow leaks, in spite of extra sealing!

So there was no releasing of gas and resealing.

But that may be an issue only with the brand and weight (4 mil) of the pouches that I was using.

 

The lemon verbena kombucha sounds good.

I'm inclined to make both lemon balm and chamomile kombucha—they both grow easily in my neck-of-the-woods.

 

I'll read some more tonight! :)

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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On 1/18/2019 at 4:28 PM, DiggingDogFarm said:

But that may be an issue only with the brand and weight (4 mil) of the pouches that I was using.

 

Oops!!! They were 3 mil pouches!

 

On 1/18/2019 at 4:28 PM, DiggingDogFarm said:

I'm inclined to make both lemon balm and chamomile kombucha—they both grow easily in my neck-of-the-woods.

 

I've decided to make some chamomile kombucha.

I've ordered a new SCOBY.


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I don't sit and read very many books cover to cover—this is an exception!

I'll be experimenting for MANY years with different ideas inspired by this book!

 

The folks who've given the book poor reviews should be spanked! :laugh:

 

ETA: Flambéing a batch of bourbon is probably best done OUTSIDE!!! :huh:

 

:laugh:


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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7 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

I don't sit and read very many books cover to cover—this is an exception!

I'll be experimenting for MANY years with different ideas inspired by this book!

 

The folks who've given the book poor reviews should be spanked! :laugh:

 

ETA: Flambéing a batch of bourbon is probably best done OUTSIDE!!! :huh:

 

:laugh:

 

 

Yup. the book is pretty fantastic.

 

PS: you are correct on flambeing outside. This wasn't bourbon, it was a basil liquor i made:)

 

 

flambe.jpg

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FWIW, this is the cheese press that I've had for a few years.

The StrudyPress—It is very sturdy!

Free plans are now available: http://sturdypress.com/sdm_downloads/diy-plans

Specs

 

moreG-008-e1422494630167.jpg

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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1 hour ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

FWIW, this is the cheese press that I've had for a few years.

The StrudyPress—It is very sturdy!

Free plans are now available: http://sturdypress.com/sdm_downloads/diy-plans

Specs

 

moreG-008-e1422494630167.jpg

That's a gorgeous looking press.

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9 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

That's a gorgeous looking press.

 

Thanks! :)

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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On 1/14/2019 at 5:17 AM, heidih said:

Rene Redzepi's Fermentation Bible or the podcasts he did with Ed Levine.

 

Thanks Heidi!

I just finished listening to both episodes—one and two.

:)

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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Cured, Smoked, and Fermented: Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cooking, 2010

Essays on cured, smoked, and fermented foods from the Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cooking, 2010.

392 Pages


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I just finished the first fermentation of my first batch of black tea kombucha.

It's been bottled in beer bottles topped with crown caps and placed in the fridge for probably what will be a couple months to complete the second fermentation—I want it to be keto friendly.

Hope they don't 'splode! gap.gif

 

I also started the second batch of black tea kombucha—it'll be a full gallon this time.

 

I've asked my SCOBY source to hold off on shipping the new SCOBY until it warms up a bit!

When I receive it, I'll start the chamomile kombucha.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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The semi-quick Boerhaave method of making vinegar.

I may give this a try using saturated bamboo skewers.

"Quickly Make Vinegar: The Semi-Quick Process for Making Vinegar (The Boerhaave Process)"


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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Super simple "hard" kefir cheese.

This is as easy as it gets, in terms of "hard" cheese.

I strained this and them gave it a good pressing.

This pressed very well—clear "yellowish" whey, no sign of solids loss.

Lightly salted.

It's a bit tart, sort of like feta.

This would be great grated and added to salads and the like.

Basic method here: How to make hard kefir cheese — one of several methods of making hard kefir cheese.

kefircheese.jpg


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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