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DiggingDogFarm

DiggingDogFarm

I've read a little bit of the book.

I think it's excellent!

I love the writing style!

 

I like that they use weights rather than volume measurements—I think that's extremely important both for consistency and safety.

 

I do wish that they'd offered more detail about pathogens, especially the ones that are capable of reproducing at a relatively low pH!

Listeria monocytogenes makes me especially nervous—I've seen death by listeriosis, it's a HORRIBLE way to die!

 

Mention of the use of a plastic bag full of water as a weight/seal seems like a good idea, but there's a risk of ruining a fermentable if the bag leaks!!!

Don't ask me how I know! :laugh:

Using 2% brine in the bag, rather than water, is MUCH better practice.

 

They don't mention the weight—in mils— of the vacuum pouches that they're using, or many other details.

The major problem that I had when fermenting in bags when I had the bokashi composting website and was doing frequent demonstrations was very slow leaks, in spite of extra sealing!

So there was no releasing of gas and resealing.

But that may be an issue only with the brand and weight (4 mil) of the pouches that I was using.

 

The lemon verbena kombucha sounds good.

I'm inclined to make both lemon balm and chamomile kombucha—they both grow easily in my neck-of-the-woods.

 

I'll read some more tonight! :)

 

 

 

 

 

DiggingDogFarm

DiggingDogFarm

I've read a little bit of the book.

I think it's excellent!

I love the writing style!

 

I like that they use weights rather than volume measurements—I think that's extremely important both for consistency and safety.

 

I do wish that they'd offered more detail about pathogens, especially the ones that are capable of reproducing at a relatively low pH!

Listeria monocytogenes makes me especially nervous—I've seen death by listeriosis, it's a HORRIBLE way to die!

 

Mention of the use of a plastic bag full of water as a weight/seal seems like a good idea, but there's a risk of ruining a fermentable if the bag leaks!!!

Don't ask me how I know! :laugh:

Using 2% brine in the bag, rather than water, is MUCH better practice.

 

They don't mention the weight—in mils— of the vacuum pouches that they're using, or many other details.

The major problem that I had when fermenting in bags when I had the bokashi composting website and was doing frequent demonstrations was very slow leaks, in spite of extra sealing!

So there was no releasing of gas and resealing.

But that may be an issue only with the brand and weight (4 mil) of the pouches that I was using.

 

The lemon verbena kombucha sounds good.

I'm inclined to make both lemon balm and chamomile kombucha—they both grow easily in my neck-of-the-woods.

 

I'll read some more tonight! :)

 

 

 

 

 

DiggingDogFarm

DiggingDogFarm

I've read a little bit of the book.

I think it's excellent!

I love the writing style!

 

I like that they use weights rather than volume measurements—I think that's extremely important both for consistency and safety.

 

I do wish that they'd offered more detail about pathogens, especially the ones that are capable of reproducing at a relatively low pH!

Listeria monocytogenes makes me especially nervous—I've seen death by listeriosis, it's a HORRIBLE way to die!

 

Mention of the use of a plastic bag full of water as a weight/seal seems like a good idea, but there's a risk of ruining a fermentable if the bag leaks!!!

Don't ask me how I know! :laugh:

Using 2% brine in the bag, rather than water, is MUCH better practice.

 

They don't mention the weight—in mils— of the vacuum pouches that they're using, or many other details.

The major problem that I had when fermenting in bags when I had the bokashi composting website and was doing frequent demonstrations was very slow leaks, in spite of extra sealing!

So there was no releasing of gas and resealing.

But that may be an issue only with the brand and weight (4 mil) of the pouches that was was using.

 

The lemon verbena kombucha sounds good.

I'm inclined to make both lemon balm and chamomile kombucha—they both grow easily in my neck-of-the-woods.

 

I'll read some more tonight! :)

 

 

 

 

 

DiggingDogFarm

DiggingDogFarm

I've read a little bit of the book.

I think it's excellent!

I love the writing style!

 

I like that they use weights rather than volume measurements—I think that's extremely important both for consistency and safety.

 

I do wish that they'd offered more detail about pathogens, especially the ones that are capable of reproducing at a relatively low pH!

Listeria monocytogenes makes me especially nervous—I've seen death by listeriosis, it's a HORRIBLE way to die!

 

Mention of the use on a plastic bag full of water seems like a good idea, but there's a risk of ruining a fermentable if the bag leaks!!!

Don't ask me how I know! :laugh:

Using 2% brine in the bag, rather than water, is MUCH better practice.

 

They don't mention the weight—in mils— of the vacuum pouches that they're using, or many other details.

The major problem that I had when fermenting in bags when I had the bokashi composting website and was doing frequent demonstrations was very slow leaks, in spite of extra sealing!

So there was no releasing of gas and resealing.

But that may be an issue only with the brand and weight (4 mil) of the pouches that was was using.

 

The lemon verbena kombucha sounds good.

I'm inclined to make both lemon balm and chamomile kombucha—they both grow easily in my neck-of-the-woods.

 

I'll read some more tonight! :)

 

 

 

 

 

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