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Nickos

Tempering with mycryo

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Hi peeps!

 

do you Guys have any experience with tempering chocolate with mycryo.

 

hope you can help!

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1 hour ago, Nickos said:

Hi peeps!

 

do you Guys have any experience with tempering chocolate with mycryo.

 

hope you can help!

What do you want to know? Have you tried it? The primary difficulty I experienced was getting it to dissolve readily. But it does the job. Using seed chocolate presents the difficulty of finding the unmelted pieces to remove from the bowl. I don't know how much chocolate making you do, but if you are doing an appreciable amount, you will want to look into the EZtemper, which is like Mycryo in many ways but easily melts into the chocolate for quick tempering.

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I've tried it, but I think the chocolate sets way too fast with it. Maybe I did it wrong, but that's my experience.

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Yes I use it all the time. I use calabaut 811 take it to 117* the let it cool to 93* add the 1 % mycryo stir it in . If it does not melt totally I will warm it a little with a heat gun. I then do a test strip to make sure all is well and keep it at 89* to 90* .i usually only use it two times in the same chocolate because I think it may add to much cocoa butter. So by the third time I go to temper my chocolate I add half as much more new chocolate to the mix before tempering again. It works great but I think you have to keep adding new chocolate so it does not thin it out so to speak. It does set up pretty quickly.. I only do molded bonbons once a month or so, not sure how it would work in large production.

 

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I switched from seeding to mycryo and could not be happier...super fast and convenient, use it for making molded pralines, chocolate decorations and even setting ganache all the time.

Never had an issue with it not disolving as some of the other posters mentioned, just blend it in with a handwhisk.

The EZtemper is a great tool also, unfortunately very hard to bring to the country I work in (vietnam)...mycryo is a good alternative for me.

 

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13 hours ago, Avachocolate said:

I switched from seeding to mycryo and could not be happier...super fast and convenient, use it for making molded pralines, chocolate decorations and even setting ganache all the time.

Never had an issue with it not disolving as some of the other posters mentioned, just blend it in with a handwhisk.

The EZtemper is a great tool also, unfortunately very hard to bring to the country I work in (vietnam)...mycryo is a good alternative for me.

 

I would fear that using a whisk to dissolve Mycryo (or for any other purpose in chocolate work) would introduce air bubbles into the shell or ganache, which, in the case of shells, can later pop into tiny holes and, in the case of ganache, can shorten shelf life. If I were still using Mycryo, I think I would use an immersion blender, keeping the blender beneath the surface of the chocolate/ganache. When employing such blenders, instructors like Kirsten Tibballs, Andrey Dubovik, and Melissa Coppel use tall, narrow containers for the purpose of diminishing the number of air bubbles.

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18 hours ago, Jim D. said:

I would fear that using a whisk to dissolve Mycryo (or for any other purpose in chocolate work) would introduce air bubbles into the shell or ganache, which, in the case of shells, can later pop into tiny holes and, in the case of ganache, can shorten shelf life. If I were still using Mycryo, I think I would use an immersion blender, keeping the blender beneath the surface of the chocolate/ganache. When employing such blenders, instructors like Kirsten Tibballs, Andrey Dubovik, and Melissa Coppel use tall, narrow containers for the purpose of diminishing the number of air bubbles.

I hear what you are saying...although I never have problems with air bubbles in my shells....which probably also has to do with the fact that I only use semisphere molds which generally dont have bubble issues anyway due to the shape 😊

For my ganache I use my bamix anyway, agreed...best way to get an emulsion 

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