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boilsover

boilsover

34 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Great insightful review. Thanks. 

Seems like experimentation is required with each pan...unless one just turns it on high, like a gas flame, and then backs off when it hits the desired temp. But if that’s the method, why not just use gas? 

The speed to reach frying temp isn’t great. 

I’m not sure I can see a niche for this unit yet. 

Thank you.

 

Yes, I think describing cooking on this appliance as ad hoc is accurate.  But I suggest that is also the case with most induction units, and for that matter most appliances and pans in general.  The idea of precise control is mostly illusory.  But I have not yet played with a Control Freak.

 

Why not just use gas?  Very good question.  I think the only meaningful answer (aside from personal preference and perceived convenience) is repeatability.  Once you determine setting X is ideal for Y pan with Z portions, you just set X again.  Gas requires judging by flame height or gross dial position, and repeating that is never 100% certain.

 

I did not measure the time needed to heat a skim of oil to frying temperature, just 2L for deep frying.  Doing that right requires a flat contact probe that can be immersed in oil.  Shooting IR through a thin oil film over a shiny bottom brings its own issues with emissivity.

 

The niche is for cooks who want to use copper/aluminum with induction, and that may be the best performance combination.  For example, one of the most revered lines of clad was Sitram Catering.  It wouldn't work at all on 24kHz, but it certainly would on this unit.   Many restaurants might switch to induction if they could continue to use cheap aluminum cookware.  And if the necessity for highest  heat falls away, there may be some real energy savings.

boilsover

boilsover

30 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Great insightful review. Thanks. 

Seems like experimentation is required with each pan...unless one just turns it on high, like a gas flame, and then backs off when it hits the desired temp. But if that’s the method, why not just use gas? 

The speed to reach frying temp isn’t great. 

I’m not sure I can see a niche for this unit yet. 

Thank you.

 

Yes, I think describing cooking on this appliance as ad hoc is accurate.  But I suggest that is also the case with most induction units, and for that matter most appliances and pans in general.  The idea of precise control is mostly illusory.  But I have not yet played with a Control Freak.

 

Why not just use gas?  Very good question.  I think the only meaningful answer (aside from personal preference and perceived convenience) is repeatability.  Once you determine setting X is ideal for Y pan with Z portions, you just set X again.  Gas requires judging by flame height or gross dial position, and repeating that is never 100% certain.

 

I did not measure the time needed to heat a skim of oil to frying temperature, just 2L for deep frying.  Doing that right requires a flat contact probe that can be immersed in oil.  Shooting IR through a thin oil film over a shiny bottom brings its own issues with emissivity.

 

The niche is for cooks who want to use copper/aluminum with induction.  For example, one of the most revered lines of clad was Sitram Catering.  It wouldn't work at all on 24kHz, but it certainly would on this unit.   Many restaurants might switch to induction if they could continue to use cheap aluminum cookware.  And if the necessity for high heat falls away, there may be some real energy savings.

boilsover

boilsover

11 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Great insightful review. Thanks. 

Seems like experimentation is required with each pan...unless one just turns it on high, like a gas flame, and then backs off when it hits the desired temp. But if that’s the method, why not just use gas? 

The speed to reach frying temp isn’t great. 

I’m not sure I can see a niche for this unit yet. 

Thank you.

 

Yes, I think describing cooking on this appliance as ad hoc is accurate.  But I suggest that is also the case with most induction units, and for that matter most appliances and pans in general.  The idea of precise control is mostly illusory.  But I have not yet played with a Control Freak.

 

Why not just use gas?  Very good question.  I think the only meaningful answer (aside from personal preference and perceived convenience) is repeatability.  Once you determine setting X is ideal for Y pan with Z portions, you just set X again.  Gas requires judging by flame height, and repeating that is not 100% certain.

 

I did not measure the time needed to heat a skim of oil to frying temperature, just 2L for deep frying.  Doing that right requires a flat contact probe that can be immersed in oil.  Shooting IR through a thin oil film over a shiny bottom brings its own issues with emissivity.

 

The niche is for cooks who want to use copper/aluminum with induction.  For example, one of the most revered lines of clad was Sitram Catering.  It wouldn't work at all 24kHz, but it certainly would on this unit.   Many restaurants might switch to induction if they could continue to use cheap aluminum cookware.  And if the necessity for high heat falls away, there may be true energy savings.

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