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liuzhou

Lunch 2019

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11 hours ago, Anna N said:

Please tell me more about how you prepared this. 

duck egg cooked sous vide for 2 hours at 62.5C (144.5F). Peel and serve. I chilled all of them and reheated at 50C.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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59 minutes ago, nickrey said:

duck egg cooked sous vide for 2 hours at 62.5C (144.5F). Peel and serve. I chilled all of them and reheated at 50C.

Thank you very much. I think I have one duck egg left to experiment with. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Turkey salad with Benton's bacon and grapes, Cranberry vinaigrette on the lettuce with pistachios

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Pepperoni al taglio from Mastering Pizza

IMG_1651.thumb.jpeg.98e5d0fdae1e0ad4dacf7c3d52f739b8.jpeg

Dough was the remainder of a batch of the book's al taglio dough @ 80% hydration made with 50% bread flour and 50% of a whole grain, stone ground Sonora/Red Fife blend

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6 hours ago, gfweb said:

Turkey salad with Benton's bacon and grapes, Cranberry vinaigrette on the lettuce with pistachios

 

 

Which brings up a question. I prefer my chicken salad with shredded chicken (best method I've found is to throw it in the KitchenAid stand mixer on low speed while it's warm). Who prefers shredded vs chunky?

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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3 minutes ago, kayb said:

 

Which brings up a question. I prefer my chicken salad with shredded chicken (best method I've found is to throw it in the KitchenAid stand mixer on low speed while it's warm). Who prefers shredded vs chunky?

 

I’ll shred if it’s dry or if it’s intended to be eaten as a sandwich, but  SV turkey is great chunky. 

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55 minutes ago, kayb said:

 

Which brings up a question. I prefer my chicken salad with shredded chicken (best method I've found is to throw it in the KitchenAid stand mixer on low speed while it's warm). Who prefers shredded vs chunky?

 

 

Funny you should ask.  Shredded for me, all the way.  And for the record I hate mildly dislike doing it by hand.  Recently I watched a Bosch video of mixer shredded chicken, but I never thought about the KitchenAid.  Thing is I worry about bits of stuff in my shredded chicken, so I shall probably continue to shred it manually.  There are worse things in life.

 

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@gfweb 

 

correct.  SV  chicken or turkey is a different substrate

 

than roasted / baked chicken or turkey

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969712E2-4BD2-4425-9B52-B1859331DE93.thumb.jpeg.2e10391840e50b0280a2d12038d3a657.jpeg

 

Two lamb chops previously cooked on the Philips grill and reheated to perfection in the CSO (Cuisinart steam oven) and a side of mezgaldi onions. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Yesterday between work and a meeting I dropped in to the Hamilton Farmer's Market (an indoor facility) to see if I could find the chicheron that one of my Mission staff had mentioned. I didn't find what I was after - but did run across Spam Musubi.

 

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It wasn't half bad!

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16 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Funny you should ask.  Shredded for me, all the way.  And for the record I hate mildly dislike doing it by hand.  Recently I watched a Bosch video of mixer shredded chicken, but I never thought about the KitchenAid.  Thing is I worry about bits of stuff in my shredded chicken, so I shall probably continue to shred it manually.  There are worse things in life.

 

 

Due to dietary restrictions - I eat *a lot* of chicken ... probably 3-4 chickens a week (yes, 3-4 whole chickens a a week) ... I, too prefer hand shredded and have to be careful about getting all the fat off 🙄 ... there are no worse things in life 😂😂

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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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On 11/29/2019 at 9:06 PM, kayb said:

 

Which brings up a question. I prefer my chicken salad with shredded chicken (best method I've found is to throw it in the KitchenAid stand mixer on low speed while it's warm). Who prefers shredded vs chunky?

 

I am kinda half and half.  I chop half of the chicken in a mini processor until it will bind together if gripped in your palm.  The other half is hand shredded then roughly chopped.  I prefer the texture and the fact that it doesn't need as much mayo to stick together.  I like a cohesive chicken salad.  

 

Awhile back, Costco started selling bags of shredded rotisserie chicken.  It is a wonderful shortcut!

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A dear Japanese friend is visiting me at the moment. I took her to Cologne to see the Cathedral, drink plenty of Kölsch and visit the Christmas markets ...

 

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First station: “Früh am Dom”:

 

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Mett, pickled Gouda, liver sausage - all on rye rolls (“Röggelche”).

 

718B4D95-9771-4DA5-BBB3-D7C08DBA2149.thumb.jpeg.318f67ed3c4a4b6cdf149dc5d6647253.jpeg

 

“Himmel un’ Ääd” - Fried blood sausage und potato-apple mash, topped with fried onions. Fantastic !

 

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A bit overcrowded Christmas market ...

 

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“Glühwein”

 

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Hot chocolate ...

 

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Heading back to the train stationa quick stop at “Sion’s” ...

 

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Fun times ...

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13 minutes ago, Duvel said:

Mett, pickled Gouda, liver sausage - all on rye rolls (“Röggelche”).

 

Pickled Gouda?  Can you say more?

 

13 minutes ago, Duvel said:

“Glühwein”

 

6987A733-EDC9-4CE8-A7E3-BD21B9C8E5E4.thumb.jpeg.36326ef2ea2decdf75ae2137f7032b8f.jpeg

 

Thanks for the Christmas market photos!  When I purchased my car,  I went to Munich to pick it up at the factory, took myself on a little driving tour of Christmas markets and brought home a suitcase full of Glühwein mugs. I gave most of them away for Christmas gifts that year but I appreciate this reminder to pull out the ones that I kept.  Oh, and that year, my own Christmas present to me arrived by boat a few weeks later 🙃

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25 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Pickled Gouda?  Can you say more?

 

Traditionally, gouda was mixed with onions, oil and vinegar and left to age for a few days. Served with butter on a rye roll and topped with the onions it is strangely called “Halve Hahn” (“half a chicken”) ...

Nowadays middle-aged gouda is usually used and topped with quick-pickled or raw onions ...

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Çilbir: poached eggs, garlicky yogurt, melted butter with paprika and chilli flakes

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Jack beans and octopus

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In Sevilla: montaditos are served at most tapas bars. They are especially popular in Sevilla.

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With leftover stewed pork and blood sausage

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Cod

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Hake roe

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On 11/26/2019 at 2:53 AM, heidih said:

Beetroot falafel sounds appealing. Just raw grated into mix before frying you think? 

Yes. I pulsed raw beetroot and chickpeas together for an even texture.

 

Thanks!

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  • Hot chocolate ...

 

7A03A162-B669-4B0F-BC14-131C43FE6890.thumb.jpeg.324036d3f1cd2c4dfb2379c8df8e9d2f.jpeg

 

I swear, I believe this is the cutest kid ever. I want him.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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北京烤鸭 (běi jīng kǎo yā), Beijing Duck - aka Peking Duck.

 

Served traditionally! With 春饼 (chūn bǐng) - spring pancakes, scallion, and 甜面酱 (tián miàn jiàng) or sweet bean sauce.

 

20191202_133224.thumb.jpg.ce99ebd5088426425a79219ab568d399.jpg

 

20191202_133233.thumb.jpg.9228356b7c8d8cdbded72d0c578c558c.jpg

 

 


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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9 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

北京烤鸭 (běi jīng kǎo yā), Beijing Duck - aka Peking Duck.

 

Served traditionally! With 春饼 (chūn bǐng) - spring pancakes, scallion, and 甜面酱 (tián miàn jiàng) or sweet bean sauce.

 

20191202_133224.thumb.jpg.ce99ebd5088426425a79219ab568d399.jpg

 

20191202_133233.thumb.jpg.9228356b7c8d8cdbded72d0c578c558c.jpg

 

 

 

 

Beautiful!  How is the sweet bean sauce similar to or different from hoisin sauce?  Or are they the same thing?

 

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46 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Beautiful!  How is the sweet bean sauce similar to or different from hoisin sauce?  Or are they the same thing?

 

 

They are not the same thing. I'd say the only similiarities are that they are sweet and Chinese.


Sweet bean sauce, from the north of China, despite the name, is largely made from fermented wheat, with only a tiny bit of soy bean. It gets its sweetness from a type of musk melon used in the manufacturing process. It is thick, black and yes, sweet. It is the traditional sauce with Beijing duck.

 

Hoisin sauce (海鲜酱 - hǎi xiān jiàng), from the south of China, 1,171 miles from Beijing, literally means 'seafood sauce' as it's mainly used in Cantonese / Hong Kong cooking to accompany seafood. It contains no seafood, but is made from soybeans with fennel seed, red chili peppers, garlic. wine vinegar, five-spice powder and gets its sweetness from sugar.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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5 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

北京烤鸭 (běi jīng kǎo yā), Beijing Duck - aka Peking Duck.

 

I know it’s sinful to covet something but ......  Oy!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

I know it’s sinful to covet something but ......  Oy!

Leslie and Finch

 

He He Long BBQ -

 

Get your Peking Duck and BBQ Pork (among other delicious offerings) cravings satiated.

 

 

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its OK  to covet Duck.

 

just saying

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6 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

They are not the same thing. I'd say the only similiarities are that they are sweet and Chinese.


Sweet bean sauce, from the north of China, despite the name, is largely made from fermented wheat, with only a tiny bit of soy bean. It gets its sweetness from a type of musk melon used in the manufacturing process. It is thick, black and yes, sweet. It is the traditional sauce with Beijing duck.

 

Hoisin sauce (海鲜酱 - hǎi xiān jiàng), from the south of China, 1,171 miles from Beijing, literally means 'seafood sauce' as it's mainly used in Cantonese / Hong Kong cooking to accompany seafood. It contains no seafood, but is made from soybeans with fennel seed, red chili peppers, garlic. wine vinegar, five-spice powder and gets its sweetness from sugar.

 

I was told by a Beijing friend of mine that the traditional sauce for Peking duck in Beijing is not sweet at all - but in fact is quite herbal, although most places use the sweet sauce that is now more commonplace.  She directed us to one PD specialist who still uses the traditional sauce - and she was right - it was intensely herbal.  It reminded me of some traditional chinese medicine remedies I've used in the past.

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