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liuzhou

Lunch 2019

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39 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Still drooling.....

 

Ugh, 4 hours of dental/periodontal surgery on Tuesday.  I look like someone hit me with a baseball bat on the left side of my face 😂

 

I'm making beans, rice and some kind of enchilada something for dinner, though.  I'm so hungry.  I'll chew little tiny bites, I swear :) 

Oh, dear!  I'm so sorry and I sympathize completely.  I hate all things dental.  I'd honestly rather have another gastric bypass or hysterectomy than dental/periodontal surgery.  Let Ronnie spoil you and eat what you can.  Hugs!  When I'm recovering from something and can't eat, I always make grandiose plans of what I plan to cook when I'm recovered.  Maybe that will help.  

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I always used to say that I would rather give birth to another baby than go to the dentist.  That would, by now, make me the mother of multitudes.

Hang in there Shelby, this too shall pass and lots of wonderful meals are just waiting for you to fix them.  Knowing you, I'll bet your freezer is well stocked for a situation just like this.  

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Spiced black beans.

Egg.

Red rice with cumin, oregano and aniseed.

Salsa with charred tomatoes, chili & onion. 

sour cream with raw veggies.

Corn tortilla.

 

 

IMG_20191025_143234.jpg

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~ Shai N.

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Chicken salad from roast chicken leftovers. Mayo with a little dijon and jalapeno vinegar, grapes

 

002.thumb.jpg.687d8173c05bbf9d4a31d306e1320f13.jpg

 

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@gfweb

 

interesting idea , the grapes.

 

never thought of that.

 

I make an " Indian Ck salad "  by adding curry powder or one of the Patak curry pastes

 

not simmer sauce  ----  too watery 

 

to flavor the final mix-up  and add dried cranberries to that mix.

 

Ill keep grapes in mind.

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6 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@gfweb

 

interesting idea , the grapes.

 

never thought of that.

 

I make an " Indian Ck salad "  by adding curry powder or one of the Patak curry pastes

 

not simmer sauce  ----  too watery 

 

to flavor the final mix-up  and add dried cranberries to that mix.

 

Ill keep grapes in mind.

 

I put slivered grapes in smoked SV turkey salad too. Even better there with the contrast in sweet/smokey. Your Cbs in curry sound tasty


Edited by gfweb (log)
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24 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Chicken salad from roast chicken leftovers. Mayo with a little dijon and jalapeno vinegar, grapes

 

 

Cubes of apple work well also as well as the surprise of tangerine segments.   
Apple and grape are especially happy in curried chicken salad.

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eGullet member #80.

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On 11/3/2019 at 4:19 PM, BonVivant said:

Little tapas at Mi Casita.

 

 

Rendered Iberico fat with greaves.

dVBWG6y.jpg

 

 

 

A piece of crispy fried Iberico fat on top of the meat. The same fat I used to make Schmalz in photo above.

 

 

 

Looks fantastic.

 

FWIW - It's Schmaltz - However; I am more than willing to call it Schmalz (or anything you want, for that matter!) if you send some my way! :laugh:

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29 minutes ago, TicTac said:

 

Looks fantastic.

 

FWIW - It's Schmaltz - However; I am more than willing to call it Schmalz (or anything you want, for that matter!) if you send some my way! :laugh:

I thought schmaltz was chicken fat

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got me thinking :

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schmaltz

 

i also associate it w chicken.

 

I dislike chicken Schmaltz 

 

and I was sorry to see that " Poultry "  fat might be considered by some

 

to be schmaltz 

 

for me that puts Duck Fat in poor company .  Im betting there were not that many

 

Ducks in E,Europe , so Chicken , and Geese 

 

can't say I can recall the flavor of Goose Fat.

 

Pork fat , well ,  its up their w Duck on my palate 

 

esp w Rilletes !

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rillettes

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8 minutes ago, gfweb said:

I thought schmaltz was chicken fat

 

Schmalz is rendered fat, irrespective of the origin. In my home region in Germany the word itself is used exclusively for lard, an the word Gänseschmalz is used for goose fat.

At least the German word is derived from the verb „schmelzen“ (to melt) and thus does not contain a „t“. 

 

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I think the "t" in schmaltz comes from the Yiddish.... as well as the notion that schmaltz is associated with rendered chicken fat.  There are some kosher restaurants in NYC (in the section that used to be almost exclusively Hassidic but is now more and more gentrified) that has a pitcher of schmaltz on every table - like maple syrup in a diner.

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While many of you may be familiar with the Toasted western, sometimes called the Toasted Denver, bet you’ve never seen a Toasted eastern before. 
 

65E090B9-06EA-4442-B14D-7FAF3FDFB1AF.thumb.jpeg.d34c0298707c9a0eadbf6432d439bdaf.jpeg

 

Scallions, shishito peppers, Black forest ham, wasabi furikake in a duck-egg omelet between toasted white bread slices. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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A quick pizza made out of a laffah. A few tomatoes, blended and simmered shortly with some sauce. Motz and basil.

Arugula salad with orange vinaigrette, pomegranate and almonds.

 

IMG_20191101_204209.thumb.jpg.c47893ef229331cf86ade71551cd722a.jpgIMG_20191011_a.thumb.jpg.39f8b4f7afc5c2d28f60c54876fb3639.jpg

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~ Shai N.

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@KennethT

 

 know that chicken fat has a revered place in

 

traditional kosher cooking.  I just do not like its taste.

 

leaving a pitcher out on the table

 

to oxidize and etc

 

WoW !

 

Unknown-1.jpeg.0ee25b9ebad4630c9f04ff7181cac7df.jpeg

 

 

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12 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@KennethT

 

 know that chicken fat has a revered place in

 

traditional kosher cooking.  I just do not like its taste.

 

leaving a pitcher out on the table

 

to oxidize and etc

 

WoW !

 

Unknown-1.jpeg.0ee25b9ebad4630c9f04ff7181cac7df.jpeg

 

 

 

Quite common in NYC and elsewhere. As Kerry noted in another topic - get over the germ phobia ;) 

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no a germ issue at all

 

after all , no germ w any self respect would get involved w

 

CkFat.

 

its all oxidation.

 

CkFat starts out bad , then gets much worse.


Edited by rotuts (log)
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You have clearly never had good schmaltz then!

 

My grandmother used to make it with onions and salt, and then we would slather the stuff on crusty bread -

 

Heart attack on a plate!

 

But oh so good.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, TicTac said:

You have clearly never had good schmaltz then!

 

My grandmother used to make it with onions and salt, and then we would slather the stuff on crusty bread -

 

Heart attack on a plate!

 

But oh so good.

 

 

My father would call onions cooked in chicken fat "gribenes"... I think I took several years off my life when eating it as a kid...

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5 hours ago, KennethT said:

My father would call onions cooked in chicken fat "gribenes"... I think I took several years off my life when eating it as a kid...

I've seen them on deli menus.

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13 hours ago, TicTac said:

You have clearly never had good schmaltz then!

 

My grandmother used to make it with onions and salt, and then we would slather the stuff on crusty bread -

 

Heart attack on a plate!

 

But oh so good.

 

 

When we used to do big Danish lunches, we always offered this  as an alternative to butter. Forget the herb. It’s made with goose fat rather than chicken fat but the idea is the same. 


Edited by Anna N Typo (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Austria and north Germany.

Hash is one of Austria's national dishes.

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Peeling North Sea shrimp takes some time. They are often full of roe and the shells make a fantastic stock.

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-----------

First lunch in Sevilla, here at one of the market bars. The same meal I had in the Algarve, Portugal cost half the price. If you arrive from Portugal you will feel it in the wallet straight away.

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On 11/9/2019 at 2:49 PM, KennethT said:

My father would call onions cooked in chicken fat "gribenes"... I think I took several years off my life when eating it as a kid...

To qualify as "gribenes" you would need to fry up pieces of chicken skin. If it is fatty skin it will make its own schmaltz. Onions are a tasty addition, but optional, I believe, or at least they were in my childhood. My grandmother cooked up some good ones. 

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33 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

To qualify as "gribenes" you would need to fry up pieces of chicken skin. If it is fatty skin it will make its own schmaltz. Onions are a tasty addition, but optional, I believe, or at least they were in my childhood. My grandmother cooked up some good ones. 

Absolutely... I forgot about the chicken skin!!  But my father always made them with lots of onions... because he loved onions...

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