Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

liuzhou

Lunch 2019

Recommended Posts

I am horrible, I started diving into this before I took the photo.   Also, I forgot to include the Soup Dumplings....   But this is Spicy Beef Noodle Soup at LJ Shanghai in Cleveland.

 

 

IMG_2829 (002).JPG

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OMG, those onion rings look shatteringly crisp.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No photos, unfortunately, but I had lunch at Arkansas' only James Beard award winner today: Jones' Barbecue Diner in Marianna, AR. (See story here.)

 

Marianna, AR, is a small Arkansas Delta town, perched off to one corner of the intersection of US Highway 79 and AR Hwy. 1. It used to  be a thriving, bustling little city, but its population has declined by two-thirds or more since the 1960s, like many of its fellow Delta communities. But people come from all over the state, as well as Tennessee and Mississippi, for the barbecue at Jones, and have been doing so for more than half a century (it was founded in 1964).

 

It's a tiny little place. Two tables, both of them castoff kitchen tables with mismatched chairs. If both have people at them, it's customary to share any empty seats with anyone else who comes in and wants to eat in-house. There is no menu. You have one choice: pork barbecue, with or without slaw, on two slices of white loaf bread. If you want a side, you grab a bag of potato chips (Lay's, regular) from the rack. If you want a drink, you help yourself to a canned Pepsi product from a refrigerator. The walls hold, besides the Beard award, autographed photos of three Arkansas governors, one Congressman, and a Little Rock TV weather anchor; assorted calendars, a proclamation from the Mayor of Marianna, and a picture of Jesus (not autographed).

 

It is truly, as its Beard award proclaims, "an American classic." I believe it's also one of the two or three oldest black-owned restaurants still operating in Arkansas. (Lassis Inn, home of the fried buffalo rib plate, is another. For those unfamiliar with Southern cuisine, buffalo in this case is a fish. Another is Craig's BarBQ in DeValls Bluff (can't hold a candle to Jones, IMHO), and, until her greatly mourned demise a year or so ago, the Pie Lady's shop, across the highway from Craig's.) 

 

Mr. Jones dishes up your sandwich, hands it to you on a paper plate lined with a sheet of foil. If, like me, you just was the 'cue without the bread, it comes with a little plastic cup of slaw and a plastic spoon. The meat is pulled, and doused heavily in a vinegar-based sauce. And it is just about heavenly. Not to mention the smell when you get out of your car out front.

 

I got a sandwich sans bread, a bag of chips, a diet Pepsi and two pounds of meat to take home for $17.50. How many single meals, let along an additional entree for four to six, have you eaten in James Beard award winning restaurants for $17.50?

 

Mr. Jones opens at 7 a.m. Monday through Saturday, and closes when he sells out, generally no later than 1 p.m. If you're coming on a Saturday, better get there before 11.  If you're planning on ordering more than a pound or two of pork to go, it's considered polite to call and reserve it in advance. He might put an extra shoulder on the pit, or he might just close earlier.

 

Oh, and be sure you sign his guest book, a spiral notebook sitting atop a chest freezer in the dining room, before you leave if you're from out of town.

 

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 3

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lunch at Nihonbashi, Tokyo: Anago (saltwater eel), boiled and grilled. Half enjoyed as rice bowl, the other half (with the rice) as soup in eel bone stock. Freshly grated Yuzu peel & sansho. Incredibly satisfying ...

 

A93BBD4C-BE18-49FC-8A22-42F0D90C9AD7.jpeg

D4092D42-C41D-4355-AFA5-EE6EB15DF4BC.jpeg

64C4DE72-94CD-4AE5-AE40-1410A1B32F5B.jpeg

  • Like 10
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liuzhou Am I correct in assuming that fresh noodles are available near you?  If so, how long do they last from purchase to cook time? Are they meant to be purchased the same day you'll use them, or do they last for a few days in the refrigerator or something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, KennethT said:

@liuzhou Am I correct in assuming that fresh noodles are available near you?  If so, how long do they last from purchase to cook time? Are they meant to be purchased the same day you'll use them, or do they last for a few days in the refrigerator or something?

 

Yes, they are easily available. Both wheat and rice noodles. They are usually used the same day, but a night in the fridge does no harm.

Some supermarkets also have vacuum packed ramen and udon style noodles which last weeks in the fridge.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, kayb said:

No photos, unfortunately, but I had lunch at Arkansas' only James Beard award winner today: Jones' Barbecue Diner in Marianna, AR. (See story here.)

 

Marianna, AR, is a small Arkansas Delta town, perched off to one corner of the intersection of US Highway 79 and AR Hwy. 1. It used to  be a thriving, bustling little city, but its population has declined by two-thirds or more since the 1960s, like many of its fellow Delta communities. But people come from all over the state, as well as Tennessee and Mississippi, for the barbecue at Jones, and have been doing so for more than half a century (it was founded in 1964).

 

It's a tiny little place. Two tables, both of them castoff kitchen tables with mismatched chairs. If both have people at them, it's customary to share any empty seats with anyone else who comes in and wants to eat in-house. There is no menu. You have one choice: pork barbecue, with or without slaw, on two slices of white loaf bread. If you want a side, you grab a bag of potato chips (Lay's, regular) from the rack. If you want a drink, you help yourself to a canned Pepsi product from a refrigerator. The walls hold, besides the Beard award, autographed photos of three Arkansas governors, one Congressman, and a Little Rock TV weather anchor; assorted calendars, a proclamation from the Mayor of Marianna, and a picture of Jesus (not autographed).

 

It is truly, as its Beard award proclaims, "an American classic." I believe it's also one of the two or three oldest black-owned restaurants still operating in Arkansas. (Lassis Inn, home of the fried buffalo rib plate, is another. For those unfamiliar with Southern cuisine, buffalo in this case is a fish. Another is Craig's BarBQ in DeValls Bluff (can't hold a candle to Jones, IMHO), and, until her greatly mourned demise a year or so ago, the Pie Lady's shop, across the highway from Craig's.) 

 

Mr. Jones dishes up your sandwich, hands it to you on a paper plate lined with a sheet of foil. If, like me, you just was the 'cue without the bread, it comes with a little plastic cup of slaw and a plastic spoon. The meat is pulled, and doused heavily in a vinegar-based sauce. And it is just about heavenly. Not to mention the smell when you get out of your car out front.

 

I got a sandwich sans bread, a bag of chips, a diet Pepsi and two pounds of meat to take home for $17.50. How many single meals, let along an additional entree for four to six, have you eaten in James Beard award winning restaurants for $17.50?

 

Mr. Jones opens at 7 a.m. Monday through Saturday, and closes when he sells out, generally no later than 1 p.m. If you're coming on a Saturday, better get there before 11.  If you're planning on ordering more than a pound or two of pork to go, it's considered polite to call and reserve it in advance. He might put an extra shoulder on the pit, or he might just close earlier.

 

Oh, and be sure you sign his guest book, a spiral notebook sitting atop a chest freezer in the dining room, before you leave if you're from out of town.

 

I love this.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@kayb

 

thank you for a wonderful story

 

and many thanks for not taking pics and posting them.

 

I would have fallen off my chair a broken my head.

 

some might say that's not a problem , as its already been broken for a while

 

but

 

what do they know.

 

 

suprise.gif

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's really not a very photogenic place, nor meal. Doesn't matter. It's sure good. I am having the barbecue I brought home for Mothers Day dinner Sunday, with cole slaw, potato salad, and baked beans. Will make all the sides in advance, plus a big ol' banana pudding, and just relax on Sunday -- and make the kids do the dishes.

 

  • Like 3

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Duvel

 

thank you for the 

 

Eel Food PoRN

 

I love eel

 

its not tuna fatty belly

 

but its Eel

 

can't get out here

 

so go back and get some more

 

best presentation ive ever seen for Eel

 

ive ever seen

 

I can guess its tastiness 

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had this for lunch.  I made 1/2 a recipe which made three servings.  It was absolutely delicious and sooooo healthy.  I used fresh frozen pigeon peas rather than green peas.  I would have liked a bit more greenery so next time I will add more asparagus and kale.  I cooked the kale with the asparagus in the pan because we don't like the chewy texture of raw kale.  And finally I toasted the almond slivers.
https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2014/04/farro-salad-asparagus-peas-recipe.html

 

DSC03031.thumb.jpg.8e6af71b5b468fa66632da941f7f7b89.jpg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, rotuts said:

@Duvel

 

thank you for the 

 

Eel Food PoRN

I love eel but its Eel can't get out here

 

 Amerca Eel caught infeshwater in the NorthEast. A huge ind8stry  Most shipped to Asia.:

"Within a year, when the farmed eels reach about a foot long, they’re harvested and prepared—split down the back, gutted, deboned, butterflied, cut into square fillets, skewered, dipped in a sweet soy sauce, and grilled. Then they’re vacuum- packed and exported to be served, as unagi, at sushi joints all over the world, including the United States."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, heidih said:

 Amerca Eel caught infeshwater in the NorthEast. A huge ind8stry  Most shipped to Asia.:

"Within a year, when the farmed eels reach about a foot long, they’re harvested and prepared—split down the back, gutted, deboned, butterflied, cut into square fillets, skewered, dipped in a sweet soy sauce, and grilled. Then they’re vacuum- packed and exported to be served, as unagi, at sushi joints all over the world, including the United States."

 

 

 

That’s a different species. The one in my post is saltwater eel (Anago), not freshwater eel (Unagi). Tastwise, Anago is a bit more delicate and less fatty ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took a break from packing boxes and made a field trip to the food truck lot. Falafel, hummus, lettuce and tomato with raita in a pita wrap, as opposed to a puffed, split-open pita, which is MUCH easier to eat. Regardless, quite good. Daughter had a gyro, said it was excellent as well. A small triangle of baklava which, nevertheless, was so rich I could only eat half of it. Excellent lunch for under 10 bucks.

 

  • Like 6

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Duvel said:

 

That’s a different species. The one in my post is saltwater eel (Anago), not freshwater eel (Unagi). Tastwise, Anago is a bit more delicate and less fatty ...

 

Yes I  know - why I said (with typos) caught in fresh water. Since rotuts is in the NorthEast I thought it might be an option

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to catch the freshwater eels as a kid in Nova Scotia, and my father would skin and cook them for me (they kinda gave me the willies, but I was belly-motivated even then and loved them).

 

I'd never tried them smoked at that point, or I'd have been working on him to build a little smokehouse. My dad was up for all kinds of back-to-the-land stuff, and might even have considered it. Who knows?

 

Many years later, as a youngster living far away in Saskatchewan, there was a little fishmonger's shop just kitty-corner from where I lived (the Cathedral Area in Regina, so if anyone else lived there in the early 80s you'll know the one). They sold smoked eel, as well as pickled herring in its many manifestations, which served as my hangover food any time I was flush enough for a little splurge (the "hung-over" part happened more often than the "flush" part, just for the record). The eel was European-style, not Japanese-style, so not the same thing. Still lip-smackingly luscious and tasty, though.

  • Like 1

"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gnocchi with mushrooms, chestnuts, spinach, gorgonzola.

A bit to soft, as the outer part started falling apart towards the end of boiling, still tasty. I'm still trying to perfect those truly cloudy gnocchi, more flour next time and also more resting time before shaping.

 

IMG_20190420_142502.thumb.jpg.02fff41836d5a537a1e6efc5bd4a05a1.jpg

IMG_20190420_142531.jpg

  • Like 7

~ Shai N.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ate half next to the kitchen sink, the other half went into something else.

KCoOUnk.jpg

 

Found 2 little "pearls" in 2 different oysters.

4c4v622.jpg

 

Actually, very soft scrambled eggs. I chucked the oysters in as soon as the eggs were done so they were not cooked. 

g3KA379.jpg

 

w4TXEyx.jpg

 

OVysr3o.jpg

 

@shain next time add a table spoon of potato starch to the dough. It helps hold the shape. With experience you will know if you need to use more or less starch. I think the dough is almost the same as Schufpnudeln (German and Austrian potato dumplings). Schufpnudeln recipes in German often mention potato starch that's how I know. It works. Don't overwork the dough or it'll get sticky. Also, I don't rest the dough but you can try.

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, BonVivant said:

shain next time add a table spoon of potato starch to the dough. It helps hold the shape. With experience you will know if you need to use more or less starch. I think the dough is almost the same as Schufpnudeln (German and Austrian potato dumplings). Schufpnudeln recipes in German often mention potato starch that's how I know. It works. Don't overwork the dough or it'll get sticky. Also, I don't rest the dough but you can try.

 

Thanks! I'm actually using dried potato powder in order to achieve the same goal as potato starch, but with more flavor. I think, however, that in a pursuit of fluffy dumplings I downed the flour too far. I agree about not overworking - too soft or too chewey I can handle, but sticky gluey gnocchi is the worst :)


Edited by shain (log)

~ Shai N.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Yesterday's lunch was panissa (recipe from Pasta Grannies @ Youtube), which didn't turn out as planned, but was nevertheless excelent.

 

Panissa.jpg


Edited by Wolf (log)
  • Like 4

A cigarette is the perfect type of a perfect pleasure. It is exquisite, and it leaves one unsatisfied. What more can one want?  - Oscar Wilde

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took an afternoon tea-type lunch to Momma at the nursing home yesterday for Mother's Day.  Ham and hard-boiled eggs on brown bread:

DSCN9582.thumb.JPG.c8a1463b1805c6e2fb478f9289d3ae7d.JPG

 

Cucumber on white:

DSCN9583.JPG.7b3028fc01f1b37574375167d532db73.JPG

 

DSCN9584.JPG.60b0e1d5f82a9f1277c514a9675851b8.JPG

 

Smoked salmon, cream cheese, dill and Trader Joe’s “Everything but the Bagel” seasoning on pumpernickel:

DSCN9587.JPG.cc7837c57bd0d10df72040ea09b8ecc7.JPG

 

DSCN9588.JPG.76abe60c53e2c0e92c4f8693749bc4aa.JPG

 

Fruit salad:

DSCN9585.JPG.49d8ad9588eaa815b0e080c27b286f9f.JPG

We also took some pastries and cookies purchased from Wegman’s.

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Kim Shook said:

Took an afternoon tea-type lunch to Momma at the nursing home yesterday for Mother's Day.  Ham and hard-boiled eggs on brown bread:

DSCN9582.thumb.JPG.c8a1463b1805c6e2fb478f9289d3ae7d.JPG

 

Cucumber on white:

DSCN9583.JPG.7b3028fc01f1b37574375167d532db73.JPG

 

DSCN9584.JPG.60b0e1d5f82a9f1277c514a9675851b8.JPG

 

Smoked salmon, cream cheese, dill and Trader Joe’s “Everything but the Bagel” seasoning on pumpernickel:

DSCN9587.JPG.cc7837c57bd0d10df72040ea09b8ecc7.JPG

 

DSCN9588.JPG.76abe60c53e2c0e92c4f8693749bc4aa.JPG

 

Fruit salad:

DSCN9585.JPG.49d8ad9588eaa815b0e080c27b286f9f.JPG

We also took some pastries and cookies purchased from Wegman’s.

I love stuff like this and I never think to make it.  Looks delicious!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   1 member

×
×
  • Create New...