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liuzhou

Lunch 2019

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Posted (edited)

Roasted me some ripe tomatoes for 45 minutes, then simmered them with garlic, diced carrot, diced celery and a chopped green chilli (similar to a jalapeño), diluted with a little chicken stock, then blitzed in the doo-dah!

 

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Served with crusty baguette. Only made enough for two bowls, but there's only one me.

 


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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20 hours ago, heidih said:

II am not a ham person. Taken to usng baked soyrizo (ok eye rolls accepted) but you have inspired me to get some going wit saved roasted lamk shank bones. Thanks! It is COLD here.

H E double hockey sticks if I had roasted lamb shank bones (now my MIL has passed NO ONE in the current famiglia can stand the "stink" of lamb) I would make Scotch broth.  Barley, onion, carrot, parsnip, some thyme and a bit of tarragon....only minus is that I can't eat celery anymore so NO celery.  It was one of my mom's and my favorite soups....along with Pepper pot.

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Posted (edited)

Turning (pseudo) Russian! Love beetroots already as a child and am still eating them year round.

 

The herring is supposed to be "under the fur coat", but mine is clearly not "under". Curly bits are grated salt-cured yolk.

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My cheat's version of "Paskha" (Russian Easter cheese cake, but then without the crust). You are supposed to eat it with Kulich but I ate it with the bread in photo above. I made it with full-fat farmer's quark which has the texture and consistency of crème fraîche.

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I made 2, in case 1 didn't turn out.

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Russian-style gherkin soup. Made mine without meat and loosely based on Rassonik.

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Garlic bread to go with the soup. Speck and minced garlic mixed with some oil were scatter on the bread near the end of baking. Garlic rolls are normally served with Borscht, however.

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There's pureed beetroots and liquid in the batter but the colour was lost when cooked. The beetroot sauce here is a little sweet.

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Little cottage cheese cakes with blueberry-honey compote. The original Russian pancakes are called Syrniki.

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Savoury version with the same cottage cheese cakes.

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Hate beetroot? More for me and Chefmd.

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Washed down with a beetroot broth, contained no vodka...

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I used Korean dumpling skins (twice as thick as Chinese and Japanese ones).

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The end of my Russian-style feast.

 

What shall we do with him?

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Edited by BonVivant (log)
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Leftovers from Saturday's dinner (not so sad desk lunch) - saffron quinoa pilaf, sliced chicken breast, thai carrot salad.

 

IMG_20190422_121340.jpg

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Poke bowl (meh). Ahi tuna over brown rice with cuke, flying fish roe, seaweed, too many onions.

 

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Lunch was brunch today, as we acclimate ourselves to Lisbon's time zone.  Eggs benedict, but with a ham more similar to a Spanish serrano and a nice slice of a hearty Portuguese bread instead of the English muffin.  Two definite improvements.  Hollandaise was excellent and the orangest egg I've seen in awhile.  

 

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Posted (edited)

My name is on a specific table in the seating layout (I saw all the tables had names on them). Traditional buchons are only open for about 2,5hrs for lunch or dinner. The boss comes to each table (he knows whose turn it is) to explain the dishes they are serving. The "menu" is handwritten on a piece of paper and it changes a little every day depending on what they have. Boss is humorous and cool. One of the reasons his buchon is one of the most popular in town.

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Gratin and sauteed vegs. Everyone got this same plate today.

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A braising French cut, tender and still retains texture. Notice both handles on my Staub dish are missing. I wouldn't throw mine out either.

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Traditional Lyonnaise food is meat and offal heavy. These pork cheeks can be cut with a spoon.

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Every single table is reserved. If you want to eat at this kind of place best to reserve in advance. It takes around 2 hours to eat a meal and the place is opens for about 2,5 hours.

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Menu outside the kitchen

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Restaurant is on a tiny street with cars parked in front of it. Well, then I made a photo of a photo instead.

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Edited by BonVivant (log)
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I bought some pork sausages that (to me) were horrible - heavy on the Fennel. So deskinned, added Sage & White Pepper, sweated onion, carrot and spinach. Partially cooked the sausage meat to defat a little - combine with a little faffing about and Voila!  Lunchbox fodder for the small dude. 

 

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On 4/22/2019 at 1:55 AM, suzilightning said:

... NO ONE in the current famiglia can stand the "stink" of lamb) 

Not topic friendly but wanting to learn. 

I had hoarded a couple of lamb leg bones (in the freezer) to make stock. It was the first time I had tried lamb stock, intended for a barley based soup, but it smelled. Not bad exactly but ... strong. I have no problem with the smell of lamb or mutton whilst cooking or cooked ... but the stock whiffed "strong". It tasted fine but the smell made me throw it out just in case. Does lamb stock have a strong smell whilst cooking? Much more so than beef? Am I an idiot? 

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52 minutes ago, CantCookStillTry said:

Not topic friendly but wanting to learn. 

I had hoarded a couple of lamb leg bones (in the freezer) to make stock. It was the first time I had tried lamb stock, intended for a barley based soup, but it smelled. Not bad exactly but ... strong. I have no problem with the smell of lamb or mutton whilst cooking or cooked ... but the stock whiffed "strong". It tasted fine but the smell made me throw it out just in case. Does lamb stock have a strong smell whilst cooking? Much more so than beef? Am I an idiot? 

 

 

Well, I haven't noticed any signs of rampant idiocy!

 

Lamb / mutton does have a noticeable aroma which some people find difficult! It doesn't bother me at all.

Many people down here in southern China, can't deal with it at all, but it's popular in the north-west. I remember requesting lambs' liver here once and the wait staff recoiling in horror!

 



 

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Lisbon lunch today.  Smoked cod with a peri -peri pepper relish.  And a small basket of deep-fried cuttlefish with a creamy tartar sauce.  I tried a featured rose' which was surprisingly dry and refreshing, with a satisfying bitter note.  The last time I had a rose' was in the 1970s when they were sweet and cloying.   DH had a local draft beer.  Tab was 25 euros in a local but hipster-ish place off the tourist track.  

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, gulfporter said:

Lisbon lunch today.  Smoked cod with a peri -peri pepper relish.  And a small basket of deep-fried cuttlefish with a creamy tartar sauce.  I tried a featured rose' which was surprisingly dry and refreshing, with a satisfying bitter note.  The last time I had a rose' was in the 1970s when they were sweet and cloying.   DH had a local draft beer.  Tab was 25 euros in a local but hipster-ish place off the tourist track.  

 

 

 

Cod and cuttlefish have me hungry. I think the 70's were the era of that pink "white zinfandel" that was very sweet. We had a neighbor who started Estrella - it was a hot seller at trader Joes  https://broncowine.com/product/estrella-river-winery-white-zinfandel/

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Still lunching in pork heaven. This restaurant makes it crystal clear.

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Good bread again

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Scoff at sweetbreads? More for me and the French then.

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Twice cooked tripes Lyonnaise-style

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Beer labels in France are more risqué than this

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Most expensive offal of all and most expensive dish served at this restaurant

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Unassuming on the outside, fancy on the inside. This buchon is the fanciest and probably the best of the 5 I have been to.

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Last night I experimented with chickpeas (trying to make a posh version of a humble stew), and am very pleased with results... ^_^

 

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Posted (edited)

Went to a modern Lebanese restaurant.  At least at Lebanese, I KNOW the eggplant will not be undercooked (I run into undercooked eggplant so often in the US and MEX, I understand why some people hate it).  

 

We lived in DC-Metro until 2003 which had wonderful Lebanese eateries, but this little spot in Lisbon really hit the mark with the quality of ingredients; you can really taste the difference when a place uses top notch olive oil, and in this case, makes their own yogurt.  

 

Shared 3 starters and each had a crisp vino verde.  Tab was 36 EU, a bit on the high side but it is in the trendy area very close to Time Out Market.  

 

First two are eggplant dishes.  The first was grilled eggplant in yogurt over crispy pita sticks, with almonds. 

The 2nd was fried eggplant over a really smokey eggplant baba ganoush, topped with arugula.

The last dish was tender seared tuna over hummus.  

Their pita bread was excellent, too, light and airy with a bit of a char.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by gulfporter (log)
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Last lunches in Lyon. This one was at the smallest buchon with little character and personality. Without the plaques I wouldn't have guessed it was a real traditional buchon.

JJVz1UN.jpg

 

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My table, from where I could see the small kitchen and almost every move the cook made.

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Lyonnaise sausage with pistachio

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Head of veal. Lyonnaise love this kind of things. Head, feet, offal, tail etc. They throw nothing away.

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More stuff from the market for lunches (and dinners)

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Love brawn and pâté. So far I like French and German the most.

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Ime4RHJ.jpg

 

One oozily soft and one hard.

ABKA4Lz.jpg

 

bafXJAq.jpg

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@BonVivantYour meals have looked great - they made me yearn to return to France soon!

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3 hours ago, BonVivant said:

Last lunches in Lyon. This one was at the smallest buchon with little character and personality. Without the plaques I wouldn't have guessed it was a real traditional buchon.

My table, from where I could see the small kitchen and almost every move the cook made.

 

 

Have you seen our dear Lucy's blogs from Lyon?  I think this is her first  (oops images lost software upgrades ) Here is another https://forums.egullet.org/topic/78296-eg-foodblog-bleudauvergne/

 

 

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Lunch yesterday was Texas “caviar”

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Weird as it may be:

 

Yukon mash/roasted chxn/cherry tomatoes/carrot tops/ darbol sauce/ onions--the creaminess of the potato really held everything together in a tortilla

 

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Edited by Paul Bacino (log)
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Scotch eggs (quail egg) with sour plum sauce.

 

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I want those Scotch eggs. Damn. I never thought about Scotch eggs with Jezebel sauce, but they'd be great.

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I don't touch leeks/garlic chives/spring onions with a barge pole. The partner gladly eats these.

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Now this is more my style

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On 4/29/2019 at 11:52 PM, KennethT said:

@BonVivantYour meals have looked great - they made me yearn to return to France soon!

 

Thanks, KennethT. Everyone rushes to Paris, Lyon is often overlooked. It rained every day I didn't do anything touristy. The beer fest was fantastic, worthy of more returns.

 

On 4/30/2019 at 3:04 AM, heidih said:

 

Have you seen our dear Lucy's blogs from Lyon?  I think this is her first  (oops images lost software upgrades ) Here is another https://forums.egullet.org/topic/78296-eg-foodblog-bleudauvergne/

 

 

 

Thank you. I went through it from beginning to end. Prices must have increased a bit, the markets are still the same, cheeses are still the same. Still wonderful.

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On ‎4‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 5:45 PM, BonVivant said:

Last lunches in Lyon. This one was at the smallest buchon with little character and personality. Without the plaques I wouldn't have guessed it was a real traditional buchon.

JJVz1UN.jpg

 

btcehjt.jpg

 

Pz9WNuP.jpg

 

My table, from where I could see the small kitchen and almost every move the cook made.

wMEg7j3.jpg

 

deQzeEC.jpg

 

Lyonnaise sausage with pistachio

Q2tmTB4.jpg

 

Head of veal. Lyonnaise love this kind of things. Head, feet, offal, tail etc. They throw nothing away.

cXAVZq9.jpg

 

More stuff from the market for lunches (and dinners)

IoZm12c.jpg

 

Love brawn and pâté. So far I like French and German the most.

cesuPQ3.jpg

 

Ime4RHJ.jpg

 

One oozily soft and one hard.

ABKA4Lz.jpg

 

bafXJAq.jpg

OK......you win!

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