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liuzhou

Dinner 2019

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1 hour ago, suzilightning said:

So...

Long day.  Went to a visitation for my cousin's son who was killed Friday night in a horrific car crash then to my husband's aunt who slipped away at age 81 of a disease similar to ALS.

At 30C and the cupboards are, as usual, fairly meager - did I mention that I am pretty much the only one who cooks in this family?  McDonald's, DD, Burger King, local delis and pizza parlors are the go tos with them .  

Too tired, in my nightgown... what is around?  

Sweet gherkins, Thai spring onion rice noodle soup, udon noodles, chicken stock.  Uh.....OK.  Warm the chicken stock, add the flavor packets from the soup mix, when hot enough for me add all the noodles and a couple of minced sweet gherkins.  When hot enough drizzle with a bit of sesame oil I found in the fridge and eat with a shooter of pickle juice.  Should hold me over until I get home around mid morning tomorrow.  

 

 

What a sad day.  I feel for you.

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1 hour ago, TdeV said:

Asparagus was cooked sous vide.

 

What time and temperature please?  I usually boil my asparagus for about four minutes.

 

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Made some turkey soup. Apple, sage. 

 

 

9A21842B-2B8B-4A59-B3CD-F9923B3F2678.jpeg

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To be honest, I tend to always roast my asparagus until the tips are crunchy, dripping with olive oil, and heavily sprinkled with salt. 

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4 hours ago, jimb0 said:

To be honest, I tend to always roast my asparagus until the tips are crunchy, dripping with olive oil, and heavily sprinkled with salt. 

 

This.

 

I like it other ways too, but that's the default at my place. Maybe not quite so heavy with the oil and salt, but similar.

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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7 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

What time and temperature please?  I usually boil my asparagus for about four minutes.

 

 

Sous vide at 185F for 10 minutes. Asparagus is local and fresh. Could have had a tad more tooth, maybe cut down to 7 or 8 minutes. Had butter and fresh dill.

 

OTOH I put some asparagus on top of a rice ham casserole the other day, which I cut small (1/4") and they were fine nuked for 33 seconds using Barbara Kafka's method. (Veg laid out on plate, tightly covered with plastic lid). My DH usually steams his non-local asparagus for about 10 minutes and then liberally coats with a spice mix which contains plenty of salt.

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Last night, sautéed Acadian redfish, macomber turnip-potato puree, and the first of the local asparagus

 

redfish2.thumb.jpg.3906481df125f7b3423d7dfdf1107261.jpg

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Mini Penne/  Asparagus in a lemon butter sauce/ topped with Parm and heavy cracked Blk pepper

 

47018138224_803e253c83_b.jpg

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Its good to have Morels

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11 hours ago, KennethT said:

@David Ross I'm curious as to your source for your satay recipe.  In all of my sources, including from a cooking school teacher I had in Chiang Mai and Andy Ricker's Pok Pok book, coconut milk/cream is usually used in both the marinade of the satay and in any type of peanut sauce.  All of the satay I've had in Thailand had a distinct coconuttiness (sp?) to it, as well as the red curry flavor.

 

Interestingly enough (at least to me), the Malaysian Nyonya version of satay (also found made by Muslims in Singapore) use no coconut at all, but make a rempah that would be similar to a red curry paste and a paste made from ground roasted peanuts cooked in boiling water for about a half hour.

Thanks for the questions.  I started with looking at some of my Thai cookbooks for reference on Satay.  Some used coconut sauce in both the marinade for the Satay and Peanut Sauce.  For the Satay, I wanted to have a less sweet and less thick type of marinade and so I made my recipe without the coconut milk.  For the peanut sauce I also chose to keep things basic with just Thai red curry and peanut flavors without the additional coconut flavor.  I haven't been to Thailand so I'm no expert for sure, but we wanted to keep things clean and simple.  I'm sure the students would have also liked the addition of coconut so next time we should try both and see what they think.

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1 hour ago, chromedome said:

and salt, but similar.

 

I often underseason food I cook for others at home because I love salt to the extent others find it a bit much sometimes, haha.

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Bruschetta with creamy beans, butter, caramelized onion, roasted garlic, vinegar, chives.

Black lentils and arugula salad, with Gorgonzola and celery.

 

IMG_20190413_215322.jpg

IMG_20190419_170720.jpg

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~ Shai N.

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12 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

@David Ross - I'm so glad that you posted that satay recipe.  I am printing it out for my "to try" file!  Oddly enough we were just last night discussing satay and the fact that I haven't made it in probably 25 years!  My old recipe calls for little more than peanut butter, garlic and soy sauce and I'm sure is very bland.  Mr. Kim was thrilled when he heard the ingredients in yours.  I'll be making my own serving beside his - mine will be minus the spicy stuff and he'll have the full strength!  Thanks!

Thanks I hope you like it!

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16 minutes ago, jimb0 said:

 

I often underseason food I cook for others at home because I love salt to the extent others find it a bit much sometimes, haha.

A long-ago friend of mine always bought ridged potato chips, because liked them saltier and the ridges held sprinkled-on salt quite nicely.

 

Once when I was at culinary school I went to a salt-tasting, and tried over 20 varieties of salt from around the world. It was a bit much, by any standard. Thankfully, at the other end of the hall was a beer tasting. :)

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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37 minutes ago, jimb0 said:

I often underseason food I cook for others at home because I love salt to the extent others find it a bit much sometimes, haha.

 

My house too. My DH loves, loves, loves salt!

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9 hours ago, jimb0 said:

Made some turkey soup. Apple, sage. 

 

 

9A21842B-2B8B-4A59-B3CD-F9923B3F2678.jpeg

Hadn't thought of the apple though I use it in my dressing.  How do you incorporate it into the soup?

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, suzilightning said:

Hadn't thought of the apple though I use it in my dressing.  How do you incorporate it into the soup?

 

I chopped up two or three fujis and pressure braised them along with the turkey. They were pretty soft at the end and I could see some leaving them out (especially since the broth was redolent with both apple and sage), but I strained them, reduced and thickened the broth, then set them in the bowl, put the turkey on top, and poured the liquid around.


Edited by jimb0 (log)
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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, jimb0 said:

 

I often underseason food I cook for others at home because I love salt to the extent others find it a bit much sometimes, haha.

 

I do the same :)

I have a coworker on reduced sodium diet, I feel guilty adding more salt to my meal when we lunch together. 


Edited by shain (log)

~ Shai N.

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Last night:

 

Dinner05092019.png

 

More local asparagus, branzini filet, potato...but you probably knew that.  Lemon not shown.

 

 

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Small chef's salad for dinner for me...

soft scrambled eggs, some pierogis from Quaker Creek market in NY, the last of the chicken noodle soup for John.  Turns out he has had the flu and now has residual bronchitis and is being monitored for any other residuals.   Thawed out some shrimp and will use the gluten free noodles, minced shrimp, vegetable stock and various bits and pieces from the veg drawer to make brothy noodle bowls.

 

 

Thanks all for the messages...

NO ONE commented on the pickle juice shooter!?!  Are we becoming jaded?😂

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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1 hour ago, suzilightning said:

 

NO ONE commented on the pickle juice shooter!?!  Are we becoming jaded?😂

 

My friend’s grandparents owned a little Sodexo bar when I was little. My favourite thing in the hot, sticky summers was to sit in the walk-in and drink pickle juice. 

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1 hour ago, suzilightning said:

NO ONE commented on the pickle juice shooter!?!  Are we becoming jaded?😂

Vinegar shots are trending these days. Just figured it was a variation...

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Sooooo....that would be a "yes," basically. :P

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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Posted (edited)

Fried up some shallots, fine diced creminia mushrooms and poblano chilies and then added ground chuck seasoned with ancho, guajillo and chipotle chilies.  Finish with cilantro, queso fresco and tomatillo salsa on fresh corn tortillas 

 

7A264821-2912-419C-9A51-2A2536AFAE5B.jpeg


Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
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