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liuzhou

Dinner 2019

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, liamsaunt said:

We had some of it last night on sausage sandwiches with peppers, onions, and mozzarella

 

1255210035_sausagesandwich.thumb.jpg.e41e27d68ab0fb585ff5091c428bac0f.jpg

 

 

 

 

This is an incredibly smart sandwich build!  I made Mr. Kim come over to my computer to look at it.  We tend to put sausage (whole) in sub rolls.  But they are way too bready and unwieldy.  You end up getting bites of nothing but bread, or sausage or toppings.  We've got some brats in the freezer and will try this method!  Thanks for posting!

 

ETA - what are the rolls and did you dig out some of the bread?


Edited by Kim Shook (log)
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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Duvel said:

I don’t do any stretch & folds or kneading with this dough. The cold rise and both lactics

do already a lot for gluten developement.

Just divide after cold rise, ball then and when fully risen slab them on the hot grill ...

 

Pictures, please !

After two hours sitting on the tray on the counter, they about doubled in size.  DH grilled them and brushed with butter, garlic & parsley.  On the plate.

They were incredibly delicate and not dry at all.  I think they could have done with a little hotter grill next time....oh, and there will be a next time...I left five in the fridge for tonight. 😍

Thank you for taking the time to help @Duvel

I will be interested it see what @Ann_T's stretching and folding will do to the dough....probably make it more firm.

I had a piece for breakfast with hummus...I just put it straight on my Wolf Gas Range and flipped it back and forth until hot and smoking a little..delicious.

DSC03022.thumb.jpg.777bd5a3d70a7bd161323d83c390e0ea.jpgDSC03023.thumb.jpg.77f41272cd3ffffe3741abb00e2b87d1.jpgDSC03026.thumb.jpg.c408c2001ca813f549564479242b49f1.jpgDSC03027.thumb.jpg.cd00938e4dfa4c210509e18010e74848.jpg


Edited by Okanagancook (log)
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Posted (edited)

Ooooh, @Okanagancook, those look equally amazing as Duvel's.   

 

I can't wait for dinner tonight.

 

I have a chicken curry on simmering and I'm about to start the Aloo Gobi.  Getting it done early.

So tonight I will just have to cook the rice and bake the Naan.

 

 


Edited by Ann_T (log)
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Sigh.

 

Those look fantastic!  Almost  as much as Pizza, another thing I miss (naan with Indian...) after removing gluten from the diet.

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Made some breton buckwheat crepes for supper. Freshly milled buckwheat, roast beets, roast fennel, cream cheese, a local water buffalo cheese, egg. 

 

 

03DE3ED3-BAE5-4C4C-AE7C-75997EBBFD0B.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

Another dish from Janet Zimmerman's The Ultimare Instant Pot Cookbook for Two.  This is  teriyaki chicken.  Rather than toss the marinade I reduced it a bit and thickened it with a cornstarch slurry to thicken to sauce the chicken.  If anyone else makes this, I'd recommend doing this.

 

Edited to add: the uncooked rice was put in the bottom of the pot, the chicken was placed on top and was cooked like that.

20190507_190118.jpg


Edited by ElsieD (log)
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This is the second ball of dough (first was Friday night). Using @JoNorvelleWalker's method of getting the oven hot, hot, hot, I heated oven at 550F for over an hour then turned on broil for 15 minutes or so. Pizza was put on baking stone with broiler on for one minute, followed by 4 1/2 minutes at 540F (oven had cooled). The black thing in the centre was the dough which puffed up.

 

Dough was made using King Arthur bread flour and semolina in the bread machine which aged, in this case, for 7 days in the fridge.

 

Pizza was made with Tangy Tomato Chutney (tomatoes, brown sugar, cider vinegar, raisins, onions, candied something, ginger purée, garlic, salt and spices) from Gracious Gourmet--there could have been more of this, fresh goat cheese, cheddar, chopped fresh asparagus (nuked for 30 seconds), and chopped pistachios.

 

The crust is definitely chewier than my old method. My husband says each of my pizzas is different and he likes them all. I'm still not sure if I like this method better. We'll have to do more experimentation!

 

IMG_1492_cropped.thumb.jpg.9f9af05b6ae45ea71f9eafc492984097.jpg

 

IMG_1495_cropped.thumb.jpg.878b5d1df950e428082091b8548164b2.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Which reminds me: what do people do about bubbles in the pizza which puff up? I have one of those plastic spikey rollers but I read something once recommending not to use them.

 

Edit: The bubbles have been more apparent with this method of cooking the pizza.


Edited by TdeV Clarity (log)

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23 minutes ago, TdeV said:

Which reminds me: what do people do about bubbles in the pizza which puff up? I have one of those plastic spikey rollers but I read something once recommending not to use them.

 

Edit: The bubbles have been more apparent with this method of cooking the pizza.

 

 

In all seriousness the Modernist Bread folks suggest injecting gas into pizza crust to make more bubbles.

 

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48 minutes ago, TdeV said:

Which reminds me: what do people do about bubbles in the pizza which puff up? I have one of those plastic spikey rollers but I read something once recommending not to use them.

 

Edit: The bubbles have been more apparent with this method of cooking the pizza.

 

Why would you want to get rid of the bubbles?   I aim for bubbles.  Especially in the rim.  

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I'd been promising Moe an Indian Curry Dinner so tonight was it.

 

267397783_CurryDinnerMay7th20191.thumb.jpg.81cfd0696f9d09c166a573bcff735a70.jpg

Chicken curry and Aloo Gobi 

1759921081_NaanMay7th20191.thumb.jpg.4531e8f792b4338e52c994d7bbee9a0a.jpg

 

served with homemade Naan. (Thanks to @Duvel)

 

1925043512_NaanMay7th2019.thumb.jpg.f5f9cd6ee348055a70d34a53ee98d319.jpg

I took it out of the fridge and divided it into ten, 100g balls of dough.  Left them to warm up and rise.

 

The dough was very easy to work with.  In fact, I didn't roll it out.  I just pulled it by hand .  

 

Thanks again Duvel.    I have a very happy husband. 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Ordered some  seafood from Donostia web site the other day. Trying to recreate our trip last year.  

 

 Canned/ jarred   anchovies and Squid in ink and tomato sauce as well as tuna in oil and sardines  The anchovies were nice, the squid was too broken down.  Did not represent the picture  of what it should be.  Just a little disappointed overall.  

 

I guess i need need to go back to San Sebastián 


Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
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@Ann_T your naan look very good indeed.  We made the other five tonight with a hotter grill and the outer texture was a nice contrast to the  delicate interior.

 

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1 hour ago, Okanagancook said:

@Ann_T your naan look very good indeed.  We made the other five tonight with a hotter grill and the outer texture was a nice contrast to the  delicate interior.

 

 

I use my gas grill on the highest setting. After some preheating it shows 550-600 F for the hood,, and of course the grates are far hotter (at the end, you want to have something to resemble a tandoor). Takes less than a minute for the first side, and maybe 30 sec for the second ...

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My DH cooked them again today and they took about 90 sec per side so, the grill needs to be a bit hotter still...night before they took twice as long.  Thanks.  These are really good....I shared your recipe with a couple of friends too.  Interesting, the dough has quite a lot of dairy...probably why it is so delicate.

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21 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

This is an incredibly smart sandwich build!  I made Mr. Kim come over to my computer to look at it.  We tend to put sausage (whole) in sub rolls.  But they are way too bready and unwieldy.  You end up getting bites of nothing but bread, or sausage or toppings.  We've got some brats in the freezer and will try this method!  Thanks for posting!

 

ETA - what are the rolls and did you dig out some of the bread?

 

 

 

The rolls are ciabatta rolls and I did dig out the insides.  Otherwise I find the sandwich is too thick and hard to bite into.  I cut the sausage in half for the same reason.

 

Last night, thin spaghetti with seared scallops, burst tomatoes and herbs.

 

908721612_scalloppasta.thumb.jpg.f0be91ba3eabca23daf6f6e646339aeb.jpg

 

 

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I don't think I've cooked a significant meal in a month. I've just been off cooking. Likely won't cook much the rest of this month, either; getting ready to move. Then I can start over in the new kitchen!

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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13 hours ago, TdeV said:

Which reminds me: what do people do about bubbles in the pizza which puff up? I have one of those plastic spikey rollers but I read something once recommending not to use them.

 

Edit: The bubbles have been more apparent with this method of cooking the pizza.

 

 

The bubbles are a good thing, in the general sense, as others have pointed out. That being said, I totally understand the irritation of having one puff up somewhere in the middle of the pie and randomly redistribute your toppings. It's your pizza, so you get to choose how you want it to come out.  :)

If you want to have the best of both worlds, feel free to use your plastic spikey thing ("docker" is the word you were looking for) in the middle of the dough, and leave the edges un-docked so they can puff to their heart's content.

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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I teach cooking classes part-time to home cooks and so far this year we've done three classes on Thai Satay that have been booked full.  I guess that tells us they like the recipes and the food.  We teach three types of satay-pork, chicken and beef, a Thai red curry peanut dipping sauce, a mint and basil sauce and a green papaya salad.  Trust me they sort of wince when they see how big the green papaya is and wonder whey it doesn't taste like a sweet papaya. This is a photo of the satay with the Thai peanut sauce and a little salad of cucumbers with Thai bird chiles. I don't make peanut sauce very often-it's pretty rich for me.  But this summer I'll definately grilling satay and making this easy cucumber salad.  

 

Satay.JPG

Peanut Sauce.JPG

Spicy Cucumber Salad.JPG

 

Satay-

  • 1 lb. thinly sliced beef round or chuck
  • 1 stalk fresh lemongrass, chopped (substitute 2 tbsp. frozon, pre-chopped lemongrass)
  • 2 tbsp. canola oil
  • 1 tbsp. fish sauce
  • 2 tbsp. dark brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp. fresh lime juice
  • 2 tbsp. low-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 tsp. minced garlic
  • 2 tsp. minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tsp. tumeric
  • 1 tsp. ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp. dried red pepper flakes
  • shish kebab skewers
  1. Cut the beef into slices 1/4" thick.  You can freeze the beef for 3 minutes to harden it a bit, making slicing easier.  Then cut the beef into 2" x 3" strips.

  2. If you're using bamboo skewers, soak them in cold water for one hour prior to grilling so they won't catch fire.  Metal, non-stick skewers are a good alternative.

  3. Place the lemongrass, oil, fish sauce, brown sugar, lime juice, soy sauce, garlic, ginger, tumeric and coriander in a blender and blend to combine, about 1 minute.

  4. Pour the marinade in a container and add the beef strips.  Stir to coat the beef with the marinade.  Cover and refrigerate to marinate, 4 hours.

  5. Prepare your outdoor grill.  (Or heat a grill pan on the stovetop or the broiler in your oven.  The key is to cook the Satay on high heat just a few minutes until it starts to char and is cooked through). 

  6. Remove thebeef from the marinade and thread onto the skewers. When the fire is hot, place the grate on the barbecue grill and place the skewers over the fire.  Grill for 1-2 minutes, then turn and grill another 1-2 minutes until the meat starts to char and is cooked through.

    Thai Red Curry Peanut Sauce-

    • 1/2 cup hot water
    • 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
    • 1 tbsp. Thai red curry paste
    • 2 tbsp. brown sugar
    • 2 tsp. Siracha hot sauce
    • 1 tbsp. low-sodium soy sauce
    • 1 tbsp. rice vinegar
    • 1 tbsp. fresh lime juice
    • 1 tsp. grated fresh ginger
    • 1 tsp. minced fresh garlic
    • 1 tbsp. chopped green onions
    • 2 tbsp. chopped dry-roasted peanuts
    1. Place the peanut butter and hot water in a blender and pulse to combine. Add in the Thai red curry paste, palm sugar, hot sauce (you can eliminate the hot sauce), soy sauce, rice vinegar, lime juice, ginger and garlic and pulse to make a smooth, thick sauce. Place in a container, cover and refrigerate until ready to use.
    2. Place the peanut dipping sauce in a serving bowl and garnish with the green onions and chopped peanuts.

     

    Thai Bird Chile Cucumber Salad-

    • 1 large cucumber
    • 1 tsp. minced pickled Thai bird chile
    • 1 tsp. chopped fresh chives
    • 2 tsp. rice vinegar
    • salt to taste
    1. Use a fruit peeler to cut shallow cuts along the length of the cucumber.  (You can omit this step and leave the cucumber either unpeeled or peeled). Cut the cucumber in half and use the end of a spoon to gently scrape out the seeds.

    2. Cut the cucumber into thick slices.

    3. Add the cucumber to a bowl and add the Thai bird chile, chives, rice vinegar and salt to taste.  Serve the salad chilled.          

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@David Ross - I'm so glad that you posted that satay recipe.  I am printing it out for my "to try" file!  Oddly enough we were just last night discussing satay and the fact that I haven't made it in probably 25 years!  My old recipe calls for little more than peanut butter, garlic and soy sauce and I'm sure is very bland.  Mr. Kim was thrilled when he heard the ingredients in yours.  I'll be making my own serving beside his - mine will be minus the spicy stuff and he'll have the full strength!  Thanks!

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So...

Long day.  Went to a visitation for my cousin's son who was killed Friday night in a horrific car crash then to my husband's aunt who slipped away at age 81 of a disease similar to ALS.

At 30C and the cupboards are, as usual, fairly meager - did I mention that I am pretty much the only one who cooks in this family?  McDonald's, DD, Burger King, local delis and pizza parlors are the go tos with them .  

Too tired, in my nightgown... what is around?  

Sweet gherkins, Thai spring onion rice noodle soup, udon noodles, chicken stock.  Uh.....OK.  Warm the chicken stock, add the flavor packets from the soup mix, when hot enough for me add all the noodles and a couple of minced sweet gherkins.  When hot enough drizzle with a bit of sesame oil I found in the fridge and eat with a shooter of pickle juice.  Should hold me over until I get home around mid morning tomorrow.  

 

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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@David Ross I'm curious as to your source for your satay recipe.  In all of my sources, including from a cooking school teacher I had in Chiang Mai and Andy Ricker's Pok Pok book, coconut milk/cream is usually used in both the marinade of the satay and in any type of peanut sauce.  All of the satay I've had in Thailand had a distinct coconuttiness (sp?) to it, as well as the red curry flavor.

 

Interestingly enough (at least to me), the Malaysian Nyonya version of satay (also found made by Muslims in Singapore) use no coconut at all, but make a rempah that would be similar to a red curry paste and a paste made from ground roasted peanuts cooked in boiling water for about a half hour.

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Thanks for the info @chromedome.

 

I had every intention of taking photos of tonight's dinner but, alas, I was too eager to taste; and once started, we didn't stop eating for quite a long time! 🤣

 

I was intrigued by @Kim Shook's Citrusy Garlic Shrimp. Mine were fresh water shrimp purchased from the local slightly-upscale huge grocery store. Didn't notice where the shrimp came from. No fresh garlic, so used 2 tsp powdered but it needed more. Next time I would use more lemon vs. orange juice. Kim and Mr. Kim had plenty of bread to sop up the juices (which I didn't, but would have preferred). As it was, I wanted the sauce to be thicker but don't think there was time to make it so. The shrimp are submerged under the cooking liquid so there's quite a lot of it.

 

Asparagus was cooked sous vide.

 

Will definitely try this again. Here are the remnants:

 

IMG_1497_cropped.thumb.jpg.43c3d519a044835db02e03ca19ede5a3.jpg

 

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