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liuzhou

Dinner 2019

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On 4/23/2019 at 2:51 AM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

 

No, I am not stalking my friend @chefmd

 

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For one thing amazon sold this to me as a ribeye.*  Contrary to the label it didn't even taste dry aged.  For another, contrary to @chefmd I cooked mine before serving:

 

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Bearnaise:

 

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Satisfactory, but I don't care for possibly-dry aged strip steak being pawned off as dry-aged ribeye.

 

 

*Amazon awarded me a $5.00 credit.

 

 

only $5 difference between ribeye and strip?

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I turned the leftover lamb into a Sichuan style Cumin Lamb.  It is completely improvisational, and I through in some veggies cause I felt the need.  But it worked out well.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Happy Easter and Passover!

 

Instead of ham (too salty) I made SV rib steak . Instead of matzo balls, I made matzo star of David. With asparagus and radish from my garden. 

On grilled pineapple slices.

 

dcarch

 

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Edited by dcarch (log)
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Posted (edited)

First meal in Lyon, France.

Pork scratchings and Rosette de Lyon, the most famous of all Lyonnaise sausages.

ClUcdKZ.jpg

 

A giant pike dumpling served with lobster sauce. Reminds me of Norwegian Fiskeboller/fish balls but then a lot more refined and fancy.

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Cut open

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The dish I wanted to order wasn't available yesterday so I got this braised pork shoulder. Came in a perfect disk shape, smelled and tasted stronger than typical pork. (Aesthetically uninteresting before slicing in 2 pieces)

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Fan of French gastronomy who hasn't met a potato she didn't like, especially cooked in cream. I love cream, butter, and most dairy products!!!

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I don't have this quality of baguette at home. The texture is like sourdough. 

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People tell me "if I eat like you I'd be fat fat fat". Now I can say "if I eat like Lyonnaise I'd be fat fat fat". Haven't seen a fat French person yet since my arrival last night, and they eat twice as much as I do. Usually full 3 course meals and lots of wine.

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Menu on a little chalk board brought to your table soon after your arrival. Buchons are traditional restaurants serving traditional (heavy and delicious) home-style food. Dishes listed are all typical Lyonnaise.

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I was the first to show up, 5 minutes later the place was completely full. I wouldn't be able to make this photo then. Authentic Lyonnaise buchons are always always always full so if you don't have reservation then too bad for you, unless you are very lucky that day.

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Only authentic certified buchons are bestowed this honour.

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Exterior of restaurant. It's very small inside.

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Back at my lodging shortly after.

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This is Lyon, I expect no less. Chips with black truffle.

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0,25% truffle

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Edited by BonVivant (log)
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wow - that's impressive. thanks for sharing. I see there is an IPA, an American invention I believe, that's +1 for the Americans. I see that it is more refined than the typical can of beer too. 

 

Hmmm...I do wonder if European pork retains more fat and flavor than American hogs


"Hmmm....what would Don Quixote do?" 

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, eugenep said:

I see there is an IPA, an American invention I believe

 

Although America does produce impressive IPAs, IPA is most certainly not an American invention! It is very British, a result and symbol of the British Raj, when pale ale was shipped from England to India in the 1800s to keep the colonisers happy!


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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Tonight I did a bunch of duck wraps. It's hot here, so minimal cooking. Minimal eating.

 

wrap.thumb.jpg.4b6874d8253b0cbe40468b4013f74593.jpg

 

Stir fried marinated duck. Bean Sprouts, Scallions, Cordycep militaris. Yellow Sriracha sauce.

 

Several were had. In fact, I lost count. Scrap the minimal eating. Minimal ingredients.

 

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1 minute ago, liuzhou said:

 

Although America does produce impressive IPAs, IPA is most certainly not an American invention! It is very British, a result and symbol of the British Raj, when pale ale was shipped from England to India to keep the colonisers happy!

thanks for the info  

 

I always assumed the IPA was beer named after the British one (for marketing purposes) and the two are different - with American hops being the distinctive and defining character profile of the IPA 

 

 

 


"Hmmm....what would Don Quixote do?" 

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1 minute ago, eugenep said:

I always assumed the IPA was beer named after the British one (for marketing purposes) and the two are different - with American hops being the distinctive and defining character profile of the IPA  

 

 

Not so different. Of course America uses American hops, so it's a (slight) variation. It doesn't mean America invented it.

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Posted (edited)
45 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Not so different. Of course America uses American hops, so it's a (slight) variation. It doesn't mean America invented it.

 

49 minutes ago, eugenep said:

I always assumed the IPA was beer named after the British one (for marketing purposes) and the two are different - with American hops being the distinctive and defining character profile of the IPA

 

Ok, if we're going to get technical:  There is an American IPA style and it doesn't necessarily have to use "American" hops - but they typically do.  British IPA, back in the days when it was shipped round the horn in wooden barrels and taking months with no refrigeration, was aggressively hopped at the brewery, knowing that by the time it made it to India the hops would have mellowed significantly - resulting in a taste that was like the regular pale ale from home.  In modern times we don't have to worry about that, but American brewers started using recipes similar to the old ones, but drinking the beer fresh. Originally British hops were used in an attempt  to recreate the British style, but the beer was very hoppy.  But people liked it that way, eventually leading to experimentation with domestic hop varieties, and for some of us, even more aggressive hopping. Hence the aggressive hop profile of modern IPAs.  


Edited by mgaretz (log)
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there was this one theory by historians that we moved from a hunter-gatherer society to a grain based agricultural one because humans wanted to grow grain to make beer 

 

so that's why we settled down to farming and civilization happened 

 

beer gave rise to our civilization 

 

and that without beer  we would all be nomadic barbarian hordes 

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"Hmmm....what would Don Quixote do?" 

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

Tonight I did a bunch of duck wraps. It's hot here, so minimal cooking. Minimal eating.

 

wrap.thumb.jpg.4b6874d8253b0cbe40468b4013f74593.jpg

 

Stir fried marinated duck. Bean Sprouts, Scallions, Cordycep militaris. Yellow Sriracha sauce.

 

Several were had. In fact, I lost count. Scrap the minimal eating. Minimal ingredients.

 

Are fresh pancakes available at the market or do you make them?

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20 hours ago, sartoric said:

Dinner last night was south Asian. Paneer cooked with tomato and onion, cabbage mallung, dal, rice and raita.

Mallung is a Sri Lankan dish, served at nearly every meal. You can use basically any leafy green vegetable, the one below is cabbage and carrot tops. It’s so easy and very good for you with no oil. Chop an onion finely, throw in pan with washed and finely shredded leaves, a chopped green chilli or two, a spoon of ground Maldive fish flakes, salt, pepper and lemon juice then simmer with a lid on until the leaves are tender. Add desiccated coconut to absorb any remaining moisture.

 

Appealng as always. Maldive fish flakes sound interesting mixed with the coconut. The coconut is on my shopping list. Will probably just get tiny drried Mexican shrimp as they are cheap and pack some flavor. The rains made the nasturtiumms go wild  so I think them an interesting green (+ flower) to treat like that. 

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I roasted some kipflers with swede, baby carrots and garlic, plus made a broccoli in cheese sauce. Served with a couple of chicken and sage snags, and a fat dollop of hot English mustard.

 

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Kipflers:  potato

Swede:  turnips

Snag:  sausage

 

😉

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13 hours ago, MetsFan5 said:

@Shelby can you tell me more about the pea salad?

Sure!

 

I used frozen peas that I ran under water in a strainer.  I don't care for canned peas......I suppose you could use them, but I'd think they would be too mushy.  After peas were thawed, I threw them in the bowl with small cubes of sharp cheddar cheese, mayo, a pinch of sugar, a splash of vinegar, salt and pepper, thinly sliced or chopped white onion  (I like red better, but I didn't have any so white onion had to do). And that's it!  I was too lazy that night, but adding diced hard boiled eggs and bacon is really good in there too.

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52 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Sure!

 

I used frozen peas that I ran under water in a strainer.  I don't care for canned peas......I suppose you could use them, but I'd think they would be too mushy.  After peas were thawed, I threw them in the bowl with small cubes of sharp cheddar cheese, mayo, a pinch of sugar, a splash of vinegar, salt and pepper, thinly sliced or chopped white onion  (I like red better, but I didn't have any so white onion had to do). And that's it!  I was too lazy that night, but adding diced hard boiled eggs and bacon is really good in there too.

 I usually use eggs but today tuna was calling. Peas are a funny veg from frozen - little burts of sweet and starch.  Today with Dijon mustrd, capers, onion and mayo. Low brow water pack tuna ;)  On toasted English muffin

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1 hour ago, Okanagancook said:

Kipflers:  potato

Swede:  turnips

Snag:  sausage

 

😉

Kipflers are a particular type of potato, generally smaller and irregular, elongated  than normal spuds (potato). They have a more nutty flavor and the because of their shape they have more area of skin for the same mass of actual flesh. Ideal to roast with the skin on. I find kipflers go really well roasted to accompany steak type dishes, particularly where a steak or meaty gravy is involved.

Swede in America is probably called a Rutabaga and is different to a turnip. The turnip has yellowish flesh compare to the swedes white and the flavor of the swede is usually somewhat milder than the turnip. Same family I think.The local supermarket sells both and the checkout people mostly don't know the difference.

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Like @Okanagancook, I too am Csnadian and tend to mentally translate swede=turnip.  You rarely see rutabaga labelled as such around here - they are usually labelled and called turnip.  That said, the white ones are also labelled and called turnip. Doesn't make sense, but that is the way it is, at least in these parts.  I wonder if your kipflers are what we call fingerlings?

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Something different.

 

Pizza04252019.png

 

 

Thick crust four minute pizza.  Tasty enough till the Duvel ran out.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Wow, I'm really late on posting It's a busy holiday week :P

This meal is from just before Passover eve.

 

Masbaha and home made pita breads.

Warm chard stalks in olive oil.

 

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This is half of the breads batch, the other half went to the freezer.


Edited by shain (log)
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~ Shai N.

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13 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Like @Okanagancook, I too am Csnadian and tend to mentally translate swede=turnip.  You rarely see rutabaga labelled as such around here - they are usually labelled and called turnip.  That said, the white ones are also labelled and called turnip. Doesn't make sense, but that is the way it is, at least in these parts.  I wonder if your kipflers are what we call fingerlings?

@ElsieD do they still wax rutabagas in Ontario?

 

@shain, love your dinner.  So colourful.  And those pita........

 

Not sure if this was a late lunch yesterday or an early dinner.

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Simple grilled sirloin burgers. 

 

Dinner Tuesday night

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Polenta with prime rib bones braised in the Breville PC.  With rapini on the side.  Love rapini, but it is only

available in one or two stores here. 

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