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Dinner 2019


liuzhou
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@Kim Shook

 

I gave your notions of salmon some thought.

 

Salmon filet is different than a steak  

 

Ive known this , but in the back of my mind sort of knowledge.

 

I wonder if its the bone in the center of the steak ?  I do bone out the bone , and tie the two pieces back together to get a boneless steak

 

I grill this hot and fast.  

 

I discussed these two cuts , even from the same fish , w the FishMongers at Cook's seafood in Menlo Park Ca

 

the agreed.   the steaks never stick to a clean , oiled hot BBQ grill , yet the filets ( w skin always left on ) frequently do

 

they decided that was because w the steak , esp.  the steak cut from close to the head   ( a key demographic BTW for All Salmon   --- more fat, more taste near the head )

 

lets some of the fat release while cooking ,k a sort of natural luberication

 

filets dont do that.    but I can't say why there are subtle differenced in the filet and the steak in taste , but their are.

 

I like them both , but usually do filets as they are easier to deal with.

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24 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@Kim Shook

 

I gave your notions of salmon some thought.

 

Salmon filet is different than a steak  

 

Ive known this , but in the back of my mind sort of knowledge.

 

I wonder if its the bone in the center of the steak ?  I do bone out the bone , and tie the two pieces back together to get a boneless steak

 

I grill this hot and fast.  

 

I discussed these two cuts , even from the same fish , w the FishMongers at Cook's seafood in Menlo Park Ca

 

the agreed.   the steaks never stick to a clean , oiled hot BBQ grill , yet the filets ( w skin always left on ) frequently do

 

they decided that was because w the steak , esp.  the steak cut from close to the head   ( a key demographic BTW for All Salmon   --- more fat, more taste near the head )

 

lets some of the fat release while cooking ,k a sort of natural luberication

 

filets dont do that.    but I can't say why there are subtle differenced in the filet and the steak in taste , but their are.

 

I like them both , but usually do filets as they are easier to deal with.

 

Re sticking to the grill...the steak muscle fibers are also oriented end-on, whereas the filet are parallel to the grill...perhaps making them stickier....in addition to the lack of fat

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24 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@gfweb

 

good point.  

 

still wonder why a grilled ' steak ' does taste a little different from a grilled filet.

 

even from the same fish , or its neighbor in the ' catch '

 

I think the increased fat, of which you spoke, may be the source of the fishy taste

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@gfweb

 

another interesting point

 

however , the fish ive tried each way is exactly as fresh as its neighbor 

 

and being as close to the head as I can get , possibly of similar fat content.

 

I wonder , especially on the girl , w a steak , more fat leaks out and gets ' charred '

 

and its that charred taste that creates the difference.  the same would happen in a fry pan.

 

so it might be a fishy-charr taste , rather than a fishy - Im and Old Fish taste.

 

none of the fish Ive ever purchased from Cook's Seafood

 

( and boy do I miss them )

 

had any aroma what so ever on the fresh uncooked fish.

 

Ive cooked these fish-ies for a cousin who teaches in Norway.

 

she knows fresh fish.   and commented that the Salmon from Cook's

 

( no I don't work for them ! )  was the freshest she had ever had

 

both steaks on the grill one time

 

and filet dans le pan the other.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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5 hours ago, weinoo said:

The recipe linked for pork shoulder (picnic) indicates this:

 

Totally different than cooking your shoulder for 11 hours at low temp, no?

 

 

 

Not that it's any of your business, but here is the backstory since you pointed it out:

 

Quotes from a PMed conversation on Facebook:

 

Quote

Hey Peter, for the pork shoulder for your pernil recipe, is it with bone or is it boneless? Just checking

 

Quote

always bone in....

and always with the skin attached.

one of mine

that cap is the chiccharone...we fight over it..

 

Quote

so it looks like we're going to have a 9 lb. pork shoulder with bone

 

based on what I was told at the market
so according to your recipe, is it 1 hour at 400 F, 2 hours at 375 F, then 3 hours covered?
since 45 minutes x 9 comes out to 405 minutes, and 405 minutes divided by 60 is 6 and 3/4 hours
anyway, let me know. we're making it this weekend for an Oscar dinner party

 

Quote

for Pernil to fall apart...it cooks long..you can even do 12 hours at 200....generally i leave it in the oven overhightafter the cooking is over....and in the morning pull it...that's key, don't slice it,, it's pulled...

 

I had forgotten that only on eGullet do you get criticized by people who you don't know for posting about something you made. Gee, thanks.

 

Oh, BTW, that's the author of the recipe I linked to above who says you can do it at 200 F for 12 hours. Many thanks! 

Edited by ProfessionalHobbit (log)
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I know we are getting a bit off-topic

 

but I hope many of you know the technique of making a Salmon Medallion

 

her is a pic , for review purposes :

 

salmon-prep_2.thumb.jpg.8f9bdb33487b531d30686daaef93b898.jpg

 

I could not find a step by step pic sequence 

 

but what you do , is carefully bone out the bone , clear a bit of salmon off one skin flap

 

and put it all together w some kitchen cotton twine

 

a revelation to me , when I first learned how to do this

 

for me , less work on the plate , means quicker in the mouth

 

for the longest time , I can't imagine eating a perfectly ' boiled lobster '  on the plate

 

I refer doing work in the kitchen first

 

the gobbling at the table !

 

again , sorry for getting a bit off topic.

 

in the pic above  

 

they seem to have cut off the ' flaps '  note the gaps

 

No No No!

 

just slide your knife into both flaps , keep that delicious meat

 

the Medallion-ize and tie

 

belly Salmon , close to the head please

 

is delicous

Edited by rotuts (log)
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2 hours ago, ProfessionalHobbit said:

I had forgotten that only on eGullet do you get criticized by people who you don't know for posting about something you made. Gee, thanks.

 

Oh, BTW, that's the author of the recipe I linked to above who says you can do it at 200 F for 12 hours. Many thanks! 

 

NO, I think what happened is that it was pointed out to you that the recipe linked in your dinner post was not the recipe you were writing about.

 

Until you told us more. Many thanks!

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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3 hours ago, rotuts said:

I know we are getting a bit off-topic

 

but I hope many of you know the technique of making a Salmon Medallion

 

her is a pic , for review purposes :

 

salmon-prep_2.thumb.jpg.8f9bdb33487b531d30686daaef93b898.jpg

 

I could not find a step by step pic sequence 

 

but what you do , is carefully bone out the bone , clear a bit of salmon off one skin flap

 

and put it all together w some kitchen cotton twine

 

a revelation to me , when I first learned how to do this

 

for me , less work on the plate , means quicker in the mouth

 

for the longest time , I can't imagine eating a perfectly ' boiled lobster '  on the plate

 

I refer doing work in the kitchen first

 

the gobbling at the table !

 

again , sorry for getting a bit off topic.

 

in the pic above  

 

they seem to have cut off the ' flaps '  note the gaps

 

No No No!

 

just slide your knife into both flaps , keep that delicious meat

 

the Medallion-ize and tie

 

belly Salmon , close to the head please

 

is delicous

 

Pretty sure your method of wrapping up the steak without the bone is how I saw them do it on ATK or CC once.  Really interesting way of getting everything cooked evenly.  Thanks for all the info.  So, maybe salmon is the only thing in the world that I prefer less fatty.  😉

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@Kim Shook

 

very interesing

 

thanks for your response 

 

"" fatty "" is many things

 

do you like Sushi or Sashimi 

 

top of the line stuff ?

 

Uni ?  etc ?

 

it has to be very high end :  nothing fishy going on

 

and an Adventure  for Sure

 

the very first time , if done well.

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For a few years now I've gotten more interested with Japanese cooking, triggered in large part with my fascination of watching Dining with the Chef, Trails to Tsjuiki and Tokyo Eye 2020 on NHK.  Our local PBS station carries Dining with the Chef and Trails to Tsjuiki, (now the new seafood market), and I can catch Toky Eye 2020 on YouTube.  Tokyo Eye features segments to promoted the Tokyo Olympics, but many cover food and dining.  With that said, Miso Soup is now a regular part of my cooking.   I especially like to make a breakfast of pickled daikon, steamed rice, a small grilled piece of salmon and miso soup.

 

This is my home version of Dashi.  I started with a recipe, but now I just vary it based on how strong I like the flavor.  This was 6 cups water, two large pieces of Kombu and one 5g packet of dried bonito flakes.

Dashi Stock.JPG

 

Then added to some of the dashi was red miso, shredded cabbage, clam meat, shredded carrot, a dash of soy sauce, Korean gluten-free rice noodles and a garnish of green onions.  Really easy to make a good on a cold day with plenty of snow on the ground.

Miso Soup with Clam and Cabbage.JPG

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2 hours ago, rotuts said:

@Kim Shook

 

very interesing

 

thanks for your response 

 

"" fatty "" is many things

 

do you like Sushi or Sashimi 

 

top of the line stuff ?

 

Uni ?  etc ?

 

it has to be very high end :  nothing fishy going on

 

and an Adventure  for Sure

 

the very first time , if done well.

Oh, no.  No raw fish for me.  Mr. Kim has tried me on everything - he even took me to Morimoto in Philly.  We've determined that I do NOT like raw fish.  The only thing I liked on the huge platter he had was eel - LOL.  Don't care for uni either.  I am very sensitive to texture.  Most things that are gooey or slimy or pasty get to me.  

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2 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

Oh, no.  No raw fish for me.  Mr. Kim has tried me on everything - he even took me to Morimoto in Philly.  We've determined that I do NOT like raw fish.  The only thing I liked on the huge platter he had was eel - LOL.  Don't care for uni either.  I am very sensitive to texture.  Most things that are gooey or slimy or pasty get to me.  

I'll eat just about any sushi or sashimi, but I also draw the line at uni. What's funny though is my Sister and Brother-in-Law, who aren't what I'd call adventuresome eaters, love uni and can eat skads of it at a local restaurant in the Bay Area.  

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Chicken thighs seasoned and rosemary stalk tucked into vacuum bag. Sous vide then seared in non-stick frying pan. Once browned, I added sliced mushrooms with a quick spray of Pam. Tossed around then added the chicken juice from the vacuum bag and reduced. We really enjoyed the mushrooms, almost as good as sauteeing with butter!

Eaten with Greek seasoned carrot fries and steamed baby gai lan. Just trying another way of reducing calories and carbs.

                                 

                                                                        1287000128_SousVidechickenthighs8481.jpg.be0d8ed3d5af8ea00660cd0dd8b7e021.jpg

                                

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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I made an old favourite dal parippu (arguably Sri Lankan or South Indian, they both claim it), seen here with scrambled paneer, a hybrid raita/green chutney, rice and paratha. Followed this up with our first ever home grown pineapple. Several months ago planted the top of a store bought one, a bit of water and voila. This was the best pineapple I’ve had in years, so sweet and juicy.

00758D09-578C-4C6E-A3B9-F2FCDFED762F.thumb.jpeg.ff9c6c3f902149d2b1d49b6dfe7fe075.jpeg

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On 2/25/2019 at 12:05 AM, Ann_T said:

 

Pizza night. 

1749472060_PepperoniandgreenoliveFebruary24th20192.thumb.jpg.601b24db45bb0ea242a509e84be90ac0.jpg

 

 

 

Is that a pizza slice shaped plate?  I've never seen anything like that before.  Your pizza looks amazing, as always!  🙂

 

I made crispy fish sandwiches last night

 

425155584_fishsandwich.thumb.jpg.0942c5dc6a4fe270d2e4214e4ad55245.jpg

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