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liuzhou

Dinner 2019

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1 hour ago, IowaDee said:

  The better they taste, the less of a chance that I will ever have the exact mix again. 

 

Bingo.   And those are the meals that husband says, 'Will you please make that dish you make last Tuesday?"    When you had 4 mushrooms, half a cup of leftover gravy, a splat of grilled onions, etc,, etc., etc, never to be found in the same place at the same time again.  


Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)
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SV flat iron steak, Cheddar/Cauliflower gratin, apple braised cabbage

 

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1 hour ago, chileheadmike said:

I used ancho and guajillo chiles 4 or 5 of each. I then used half of the resulting chile paste. The rest went in the freezer. 

1/2 onion

3/4 box of chicken broth

1 tablespoon Better than Bullion Beef

2 clove garlic

1/2 stick of butter

Canola oil to keep the butter from browning

Handful of flour

Salt/cumin/Mexican oregano/chile powder

 

I softened them in the instant pot with water using the rack thing to keep them submerged. 15 minutes with natural release.

Blend them with some of the water until smooth.

Run through a fine mesh strainer to remove skins and seeds.

 

I heated butter with a little bit of oil and sweated some diced onion until soft. Then add chopped garlic and flour to make a roux.

Wisk in chicken broth and thicken. I then added some beef better than bullion and the chile paste. 

Season with salt, cumin, Mexican oregano and some chile powder.  

Thanks Mike.

 

I was taught that with dried chile's to toast them before submerging in water to 'bloom' prior to blending - thoughts?

 

I love chile sauces, just have to make sure I tame the heat so my little 2 y/o doesn't blow smoke out of her ears!

 

 

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2 minutes ago, TicTac said:

Thanks Mike.

 

I was taught that with dried chile's to toast them before submerging in water to 'bloom' prior to blending - thoughts?

 

I love chile sauces, just have to make sure I tame the heat so my little 2 y/o doesn't blow smoke out of her ears!

 

 

I did not toast the chiles first this time. I have before in a toaster oven. We moved a month ago, the new kitchen is way smaller  and it's still packed somewhere. I was a kitchen manager in a Mexican restaurant for several years, we did not toast the chile pods before grinding. We soaked them overnight in a dedicated trash can-like thing in the walk in overnight.

 

Anchos aren't too hot, also the roux and broth helps to tame what heat they do have. Cheese, meat and tortillas help even more. Plus, the kid has to learn, right? 

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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Indeed she does!!

 

My 6 y/o likes pickled chile's now and even tries a tiny bit of hot sauce every now and then.

 

Very interesting about not toasting - I may try that this time and see if I can tell a difference.

 

 

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

Chicken with butter, lemon, caper sauce. Hen-of-the-Woods mushroomms with garlic. Rice.

Wow. That’s a meal that calls out to me even though I’m not a fan of chicken breast. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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tis the uni season. These are wild Maine uni. served in a shiso leaf with a little maldon salt, meyer lemon and olive oil.

 

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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

I'm not usually a fan either, but since I discovered the 1-10-10 method I'm more tolerant in certain applications.

I prefer dark meat as well, but that dish with the mushrooms looks awfully yummy. What is this method?

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Prawn roe covered avocado, freekeh with spinach and seared salmon.

I was not careful when trying to remove the avocado pit.

gYVD77G.jpg

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Inspired by a guilty conscience:

 

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Before my last grocery trip I desperately wanted some fresh broccoli. It has been slowly ageing in the crisper drawer since then!


So tonight I remembered a recipe that was going around for the longest time that involved roasted broccoli and roasted shrimp. I remember making it once and being quite underwhelmed given the hype that it received. But I went down my own garden path tonight. Early on I simmered some garlic in some olive oil and then when the time came tossed the broccoli in that then added some salt and some Aleppo peooer. I roasted that for 10 minutes and then added some shrimp which had also been bathing in olive oil flavoured with garlic. A little lemon on the side and I had a tasty and easy dinner. 
 

I think the secret to making this dish tasty is to keep a close eye on those shrimp. If they are overcooked then the dish isn’t worth the time to put together. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Leftovers this week.  Saturday, I just put out a bunch of bits and pieces.  Crackers, beef stick, and Cheddar:

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Artichoke and spinach dip with chips:

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Shrimp and Crab Bisque and buttered toast:

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Last night was salad and a re-run (though, except for the sauce, not actually leftover) of the Aldi pork schnitzel we had the other night:

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@Anna N

 

so this is a Pan roast ?

 

on to of the stove ?

 

looks both tasty and easy 

 


Edited by rotuts (log)

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32 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@Anna N

 

so this is a Pan roast ?

 

on to of the stove ?

 

looks both tasty and easy 

 

 

It was a pan roast in the Breville smart oven on a quarter sheet pan!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

 

 

6D22BBB2-1378-45E1-8E2F-897FF5CE53EA.thumb.jpeg.0e438c1cd7cceb75af381539597ebf21.jpeg

 

 

I think the secret to making this dish tasty is to keep a close eye on those shrimp. If they are overcooked then the dish isn’t worth the time to put together. 

 

This is a truism worth tatooing on one's forehead.       Your's above look perfect.

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2 hours ago, Anna N said:

So tonight I remembered a recipe that was going around for the longest time that involved roasted broccoli and roasted shrimp. I remember making it once and being quite underwhelmed given the hype that it received. sh isn’t worth the time to put together. 

 

That sunds lke a well known Mllssa Clark recipe.  https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1012388-roasted-broccoli-with-shrimp Never appealed to me either. When the broccoli is in need of use I do somethng along the lines of the for a while often discussed Gordon Ramsay simple soup. Caveat - I like the pure taste of broccoli. My people always had the vinegar bottle on the table with many soups to personalise acidity.  https://chefgordonramsayrecipe.com/gordon-ramsays-broccoli-soup/

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Can any of you remember back to mid-Century school lunch and "Beanie Weenie"?      This time, not from VanCamp's but from scratch!    Mayocoba beans, ham hock, onion, bay leaf.    Catsup and maple syrup added after beans were tender.    Husband said the flavor was dead on perfect.    Not sure that's a compliment!   

 

And, since locally we are having a leafy green safety scare, chard from the garden.   

 

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Last night's dinner, aka "What I had in the kitchen because I wasn't going out in freezing rain and snow"- sauteed chicken with a cornmeal coating, with North Carolina barbecue sauce glaze, with a side of steamed corn with golden gravy (nutritional yeast/stock/soy sauce/garlic gravy), over grits.

 

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Edited by Dante (log)
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