Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Genoa Salami pH level not right.


Recommended Posts

Looking to learn and ask questions about home curing meats.  I have an 11 lb batch of genoa salami going and it is my first batch.  Worried about the PH level not dropping as needed.  Need some advice.   I followed the Marianski recipe exactly.  I have a pH meter and the starting point was 6.15pH which I thought was unusually high.  2.5 months in, I am about 73% of starting weight yet my pH is only 5.88pH.  My curing chamber is consistently at 57deg. F. /80% humidity.  My pH tester seems calibrated properly using the calibration solutions.  I am using the meat probe adapter and just sticking it in the salami until the tip is submerged etc...Thanks in advance for any suggestions or reassurances. 

 

Glen

DBE338D7-F5FF-42B5-8FE0-6D5CC448AF68.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

On page 125 of "The Art of Making Fermented Sausages" it reads...."Remember, however, that slow-fermented sausages are made with a little sugar so the pH usually remains at pH 5.8 or higher.  Ensuing removal of moisture guarantees security."  

 

I would be so appreciative of any feedback on this.  I am new to this site and not sure how to engage folks with experience on this topic.  Much thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't made that particular recipe, but I think that pH sounds like it's on target, I don't think there's much to be concerned about there. I've found Marianski's recipes reliable in the past, and the pH is dropping, so it's not like your bacteria have died. I think you're on track.

  • Like 1

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Just a quick follow up for some feedback if anyone is willing.  The texture is a bit soft.  The taste is great but I was hoping for a bit firmer texture.  Does some additional drying time help here?  I am around 70% or original weight.  Would 65% make the difference?  

 

Thanks,

Glen

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for the assistance.  I am sure I followed the recipe exactly.  I used high end heritage Berkshire pork and back fat and Piedmontese chuck.  I agree, the photo and the product look like much more than 20%.  I checked the total weight at the end to ensure I had the right total at almost exactly 5kg.  The grind looked great.  Same as I use for fresh sausages and the texture is always how I like it.  I have never run back fat through it however.  I do recall that it might have looked more like lard than a grind and it was a frozen too.  I used the 3/8 plate for the fat and pork and the 1/8 plate for the chuck. The beef chuck was not overly fat either.  It does taste really good so it wont go to waste!  Again, thanks guys.  Really glad I found this forum and I appreciate the help and advice.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Just a little update for anyone that might be interested. Seems like an additional 2 months at the recommended storage temp of 55 deg. And 75% humidity has my weight down to 66%. Still a bit fatty (mix and grind issues) but the texture has really firmed up and it is a really enjoyable product. Thanks again for this forum and assistance. I’ll keep at it. 

252C34E7-9EC1-45C5-97D6-9B0A9E0D3594.jpeg

Edited by Glen (log)
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Delicious 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive missed a few things over the years :

 

growing my own Espalier [ ancient ] French Pears     these only fruit eery other year , and are small  but to die for

 

and making Sausage :  both fresh , like Weisswurst , British Bangers, and so many more

 

and of course , dried cured sausage , as above , 

 

congratulations !

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

Good job, Glen.

 

I have three questions on this topic:

 

1. I was just reading the Olympia Provisions book and they recommend starting your salami at 73F for 84 hours until it gets to a pH of 4.8. Other articles I have read recommend starting the cure at 80F for 12 hours, specifically Ruhlman, and use a pH of 4.9 as their target. I have read other articles where they say 5.0 to 5.3 is a fine target. Just about everyone says that if you don't hit their target, throw it out. I just made a high fat salami with chunks of fat in it, the fat coming from a Mangalitsa and the leaner meats from a Tamworth Large Black  cross. So the salami is soft because it has such a high fat content.  I used Prague #2 and Bactoferm F-RM-52, which contains two strains. The lactobacillus sakei is effective at 30C or 86F and the Staphylococcus carnosus is effective at the same temperature range. I understood that Staphylococcus carnosus was supposed to be effective at much lower temperatures. Is that true? What starter culture is effective at 60F? My salami tastes great and I have eaten quite a bit of it and have not had any ill effects. What exactly is the time, temperature and target pH for such salami? Also, I have just created salami nocciola, from a Yorkshire loin roast, plus coppa and shoulder, which I stuffed into a beef middle. I use Prague #2, of course, and Bactoferm F-RM-52. I also use liberal amounts of wine, which lowers the pH immediately and usually double the amount of dextrose. In this case, I used 1.5X the amount of dextrose but probably should have used more because the pH still in the mid 5s. It takes weeks to lower the pH. The Olympia Provisions books would tell me to throw the salami out. Of course OP uses Bactoferm LHP. I was thinking of using a combination of LHP and F-RM-52. Is that advisable? 

 

2. I used the Bactoferm Mold 600 and on my whole muscle chopped salami stuffed into a beef bung, the mold has taken off. However, not so on my salami nocciola. I used distilled water and several applications of the mold in high concentration, even soaking the mold in the beef middle casing. What gives? My drying room is at 60F and around 65 percent humidity. The beef bung and the beef middle are hanging next to each other.

 

3. I have a Milwaukee pH meter with the meat probe. This probe does not seem to be a very good one. I calibrate before using the probe each time. Is there a slimmer needle I can use. I do not always tie off my dry sausages into smaller salami but use the full length of the beef middle etc. and this makes testing the pH more difficult. (One solution is to do what I do for my fresh sausage and section them off into smaller links.) Thanks.

 

Thanks you so much,

 

Mark.

 

Edited by Mark LaPolla (log)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...
On 12/19/2018 at 8:15 AM, Glen said:

On page 125 of "The Art of Making Fermented Sausages" it reads...."Remember, however, that slow-fermented sausages are made with a little sugar so the pH usually remains at pH 5.8 or higher.  Ensuing removal of moisture guarantees security."  

 

I would be so appreciative of any feedback on this.  I am new to this site and not sure how to engage folks with experience on this topic.  Much thanks.

Glen I cannot help you with the PH thing... I'm brand new at this too... But I'd like to compliment you on the mold accumulation. Looks like man made casings? 

 

On 2/14/2019 at 12:55 PM, Glen said:

Just a little update for anyone that might be interested. Seems like an additional 2 months at the recommended storage temp of 55 deg. And 75% humidity has my weight down to 66%. Still a bit fatty (mix and grind issues) but the texture has really firmed up and it is a really enjoyable product. Thanks again for this forum and assistance. I’ll keep at it. 

252C34E7-9EC1-45C5-97D6-9B0A9E0D3594.jpeg

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Me again, Joe Wood... Product looks great and tasty... I hope to reach that level myself... Being brand new at this I'm quite excited... Can you tell me what spices   you used? Did you use any Mold600?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Joe Wood
      Where I live pork loin is often on sale  for $2.00 or even less... Has anyone an opinion about using just pork loin for the meat along with the 20% pork fat? ?
      I've read that any meat can be used to make the cured salami... I'd like to hear from anyone before I try it...
    • By Joe Wood
      Hello to all... At this stage of my dry salami making I'm afraid I have more questions than I'm entitled to. However any help I receive will be most appreciated.
      1.   I followed directions on the 5 lb. batch as well as I was able... Three weeks into this I have achieved about 43% reduction in weight on all links. I use a wine fridge to cure.. My neighbor took one link home at the same time and just "hung it in his refrigerator" with no special settings for humidity or temperature... This one came out IDENTICAL to all the rest in appearance and weight reduction of 43%. How can this be?
      2.   I put the left over Mold 600 in a bowl in with the drying salami links. Is this good or not good ?
      3.   Now  that desired weight has been achieved is further aging beneficial?
      Thanks so much for offering a site like this... All the best to all of you...
      Joe Wood


    • By Grishna
      Coppa is a classic italian delicacy of matured cured meat. Not as widely known as prosciutto and, in my opinion, not  justifiably. The curing time takes weeks, as it should
      for a well matured and multilayered flavour. Good things come to those who wait, but while you do, why not treat yourself to a quick fix  of cooked coppa? Here is what I do:
      Salt the meat in 2% dry rub (nitrate salt and regular salt 50/50) in a vacuum bag for 5 days; Rub dry herbs and spices (whatever comes to mind). The meat will be sticky, so it's easy; Cook on rack above a tray in the oven on fan setting at 80 celcius to internal temperature 67 celsius.  This will take a couple of hours. When internal temperature reaches 60 -ish I add some boiling water in the tray to speed up the heat delivery; Cool in the fridge overnight; Enjoy. This is a seriously moreish ham.
       
       
         
    • By devinp
      I just finished curing my first lomo, and all looks/smells/tastes great except a couple sections inside the lomo that could be black mold?  I kept the exterior clean from mold (I had mostly white and some green pop up during curing, but wiped with vinegar to keep clean).  This picture shows one of those spots closer to the edge in the fat, but there was a second near the middle of the loin that I cutout already.  Unless I find more substantial sections, I think I'm good just cutting away those parts, but would love second opinions..  Thanks.
       

    • By CarsonWyler
      I'm looking for guanciale, preferably in the Sonoma County area but am willing to travel a bit or order online if necessary. Any ideas?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...