Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Springform Pan Size Substitutions - what problems might arise?


Recoil Rob
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'd like to try this recipe from Saveur for Hazelnut Sbrisolona. It calls for three 6" Springform pans but I really don't feel like shelling out $35 - $45 for three 6" pans that I may only use once..

The total area of three 6" Springforms is roughly the same as one 9" Springform, other than aesthetics do you foresee any problems doing this?

Edited by Smithy
Adjusted title for clarity (log)

My problem lies in reconciling my gross habits with my net income.

- Errol Flynn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The area of a 9" circle is 63.62". The area of a 6" circle is 28.27". I don't get how 3 x 28.27 = 63.62. I've done a lot of research reducing dessert recipes, and although you don't have to be exact, you need to be closer than that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, JAZ said:

The area of a 9" circle is 63.62". The area of a 6" circle is 28.27". I don't get how 3 x 28.27 = 63.62. I've done a lot of research reducing dessert recipes, and although you don't have to be exact, you need to be closer than that.

 And here is a link that compares volumes Click

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a crumbly, rustic, cookie-like thing, so I think you're fine to change pan sizes as long as they do have close to equal area.  2/3 of the recipe in a 9" pan maybe? Or just mash it all out on a cookie sheet in either 6" rounds or whatever shapes you like.  I don't think the springform pans are essential, the stuff is not going to rise much and instructions are to break it into pieces anyway. 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree with pastrygirl; the springform pans aren't essential to the recipe (they probably use it so you can release the sides and get the cookie out more easily); you could probably use a small rectangular (quarter sheet) cookie or brownie pan if you lined it with a foil sling so you can remove the cookie easily.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/11/2018 at 7:51 AM, JeanneCake said:

Agree with pastrygirl; the springform pans aren't essential to the recipe (they probably use it so you can release the sides and get the cookie out more easily); you could probably use a small rectangular (quarter sheet) cookie or brownie pan if you lined it with a foil sling so you can remove the cookie easily.

But I'd keep a close eye on it as it bakes. With a bigger pan, it might need longer in the oven to get the center done, which could result in the edges getting overbaked, which might imply that you need to reduce the oven temperature. If this is intended for an event, I'd probably try a test run ahead of time, so that if you have issues, you can make adjustments and try again.

  • Like 1

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...