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Mullinix18

Should I start a blog with the recipes antoine Carême?

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I'm thinking about starting a blog featuring the recipes of antoine Carême that I've translated from 1700s French? No English versions of his works exist and his work is hard to find, even though he is the greatest chef who ever lived. After I get through his works I'd add menon, la Varenne, and other hard to find, but historically important masters of French cuisine. 

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Are they protected by copyright?

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Way over 100 Years old. So no. Also, with much digging, I found the original source material online for free in archives. So no its free to use. Even escoffier is free to use.

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It's not like a simple Google translate will suffice. Language has simply changed too much since the 1700s. Especially with the amount of Era specific cookery jargon used. It comes out mostly nonsense in any translation website. 

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Although I follow a few blogs they seem to be going by the wayside. It might be more useful for searchers  of information if you did a  Wiki page. No revenue but if sharing info is your goal it might reach way way more folks.

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1 minute ago, heidih said:

Although I follow a few blogs they seem to be going by the wayside. It might be more useful for searchers  of information if you did a  Wiki page. No revenue but if sharing info is your goal it might reach way way more folks.

Yeah but I like money too..lol. It's not easy picking each recipe apart to figure out what exactly it's trying to say... Maybe I'll write a book when I've translated all of them..

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Well monetizing is whole other subject. Book seems better for  the "nerds"  Let us know

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12 minutes ago, Mullinix18 said:

I agree. Anyone wanna help? 

What does helping look like ?

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2 minutes ago, gfweb said:

What does helping look like ?

Help me translate. I do it in Google docs so collaboration is easier, and also maybe help set up a website or something. Idk how I'm going to format and subsequently monetize this yet. 

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15 minutes ago, Mullinix18 said:

Help me translate. I do it in Google docs so collaboration is easier, and also maybe help set up a website or something. Idk how I'm going to format and subsequently monetize this yet. 

 

I'm no good to you.

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There is a facebook group 'Oxford symposium on food and cookery' with a lot of scholars. Someone there might be interested in helping out with your project 

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To be honest, the chances of you earning money from such a niche interest is negligible, either through a blog or a book. Do it out of love for the subject, which I think is very worthy.

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Writing an ebook is relatively easy and you can put it places like Amazon yourself without having to try and sell the book to a publisher. This is probably easier than monetizing a blog, I have a bit of experience here and there just isn't the money in it anymore. The great part is that you get to determine the price and I know that e-cookbooks under $15 sell well. -If you're willing to do under $5, you'll move a lot of units.

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I can't believe that no contemporary English translations of Careme exist! That's bonkers, given his historical importance. William Hall translated 3 of Careme's biggest works and published them in a single volume called "French Cookery" in 1836. Happily, this edition has been digitized and is available for free online via Archive.org. We live in amazing times.

 

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