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gfron1

Restaurant flatware thoughts

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I'm in the process of choosing new flatware for my new restaurant. My last restaurant used THIS. I liked the style but it turned out they were too big for many guests, especially women who preferred to use the small fork and spoon. I don't want to make that mistake again. My new place is much higher end and the flatware needs to match. Higher end doesn't mean expensive necessarily, but a stylish design. I'm interested in hearing (or better yet seeing) flatware that you've liked when eating out. Bonus points for contemporary design.

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My main beef with restaurant flatware is when it won't stay resting on the plate. Perhaps it has a heavy handle that makes it unstable. Perhaps its a high-design weird-shaped  plate that is just impractical for the utensils...nothing will stay on it.  Maybe do a test with your cutlery and dishes first?

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Those don't look big, but it's hard to tell.  You also don't want thin and flimsy, or small handles that are hard to hold on to. 

 

Do you have Crate & barrel near you?  I think they're good for stylish basics. 

 

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This is something that bothers my husband a lot, me not so much.  Skinny handles on the cutlery.  He detests the feel of it.  I like the style you had,  but then I am not a fan of anything too ornate.

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I like the design you are using previously.  Having flatware that's too small it's just as much of a problem is having it that's too big.

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I've learned that artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

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13 hours ago, ElsieD said:

This is something that bothers my husband a lot, me not so much.  Skinny handles on the cutlery.  He detests the feel of it.  I like the style you had,  but then I am not a fan of anything too ornate.

I'm going to show you something I've been eyeballing and reading all of these comments is making me second guess it. While I'd prefer my flatware stand out, it would be okay if it just disappeared all together - meaning good enough to make sense but not remarkable on a positive or negative side. LOOK HERE

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Not sure how helpful this is to the restaurant setting but I'll throw it out there.  

I have the Mepra brand Forma pattern flatware for use in my home. I liked that I could supplement the standard 5 piece place setting with extras like butter knives, more dessert forks etc.  It is a simple but stylish, modern design. I've had it for over 5 years and the finish has held up very well. I very much like the weight and balance of the utensils in the hand and my guests have commented favorably.  However, I see the first reviewer here specifically calls out the knife and teaspoon, two of my favorite items, for negative feedback.  This makes me think that you may indeed be better off going with something that's unremarkable.

 

I'll also add that while I find the weight of the cutlery I have appealing in the hand, it's possible that it would create balance issues and potential noise and clatter if they fall off plates when clearing plates and tables. 

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@gfron1

No no no.....I would hate to have to eat with those pieces!


Edited by lindag (log)
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39 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

I'm going to show you something I've been eyeballing and reading all of these comments is making me second guess it. While I'd prefer my flatware stand out, it would be okay if it just disappeared all together - meaning good enough to make sense but not remarkable on a positive or negative side. LOOK HERE

 

Nope. I'd hate those pencil thin handles and I don't even have arthritis.

 

Which is another issue.

 

I think your idea of being unremarkable is right on.  Its about the food.

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I don't care for them either.  Looks as if they can't make up their minds if they are flatware or chopsticks!

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52 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

I'm going to show you something I've been eyeballing and reading all of these comments is making me second guess it. While I'd prefer my flatware stand out, it would be okay if it just disappeared all together - meaning good enough to make sense but not remarkable on a positive or negative side. LOOK HERE

 

I showed them to John.  He does not like them.  He says they look like he couldn't get a good grip on them and he said the short blade on the knife "would drive me nuts".    I also agree with @gfweb that utensils that won't rest on the plate are irksome.

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Or put another way....I'd never return to a restaurant because of great flatware, but frustrating forks might keep me away. 

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2 hours ago, gfron1 said:

I'm going to show you something I've been eyeballing and reading all of these comments is making me second guess it. While I'd prefer my flatware stand out, it would be okay if it just disappeared all together - meaning good enough to make sense but not remarkable on a positive or negative side. LOOK HERE

 My thought was exactly that if the cutlery catches my attention more than  fleetingly  then it is wrong! 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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You’ve heard enough ‘no’s on the skinny wood handles, but I’ll also suggest that wood doesn’t hold up as well over time if it’s going to be soaking in a tub  during service then run through a commercial dishwasher. 

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The demographic of your expected clientele may be a factor. I have small hand and some grip issues so prefer smaller and smoother but sturdy. Right image bugs me,  left  one is my preference.  These just happen to be in my kitchen. I also agree that the food is the focus not tableware although you've been to places like Vespertine where the "experience" is the focus. Plus people tend to "walk away" cool stuff...

flatware.JPG


Edited by heidih left/right mix up (log)
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Add me to the "no skinny handles" list. I want a good, heavy flatware that balances well in my hand and on the plate. Nothing overly ornate.

 

In the link @blue_dolphin posts, I love the Boheme pattern (here). Just my personal preference.

 


Edited by kayb to add link. (log)
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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I like less frilly.

 

on the above , Id prefer the fork on the L

 

that bing said , as the flatware get ' better ' the more it will cost the restaurant.

 

Id also say , the ' better ' the food is  , without wasting time on what ' better ' means

 

the heftier the flatware should be , but still simple.

 

Im going to the restaurant for the food  and the flatware can't be a distraction either way :

 

artisy ? cheap feel ?   no thanks.

 

P. S. :  thinking back to the various restaurants ive been in , at all levels ,

 

I can't recall any of the flatware.

 

I take that as a good sign that it ' matched ' the food and did not distract from it.

 

of course , Plastic does not count.


Edited by rotuts (log)
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15 minutes ago, rotuts said:

I can't recall any of the flatware.

 That’s what I was trying to say earlier. Should be an extension of your hands so that you can pay attention to the food.  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Georg Jensen...I like Scandinavian design for tableware. Simple, sculptural, functional.


"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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5 hours ago, lindag said:

I prefer substantial pieces like this.

Me, too.  That is almost exactly what my stainless is like at home.  I am NOT the right person to chime in because I tend to detest most modern design.  I adore what is called Hotel Silver (not really silver, but it has the sheen and the look, but not the heft).

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1 hour ago, BeeZee said:

Georg Jensen...I like Scandinavian design for tableware. Simple, sculptural, functional.

I too like Scandinavian design. I own Georg Jensen tableware.  Wouldn’t recommend mine though!  

986BEEB3-4822-4C12-8E9B-4E1BE81EE552.thumb.jpeg.c35d5b97f234adc8d3f504dad7cb12a8.jpeg

 

 Without flash but showing distortion to avoid shadows.

 

518627C0-70C3-425A-99D2-970299EE7F15.thumb.jpeg.2e765f961c177f469f2316e4a00f3651.jpeg

 

With flash. Less distortion but the colour of the handles is washed out.

 

15BE4810-1BE4-4A81-8011-EAECD00F0FEB.thumb.jpeg.e2bb3ed7f3c1ecd7a879785203d5499f.jpeg

 

 My late husband chose these in Copenhagen. Initially they appealed to me. 

 

 I am sure there are patterns I might appreciate more.  But these almost left us bankrupt back in the day. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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