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scott123

Alkalizing Chocolate

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Perhaps it was the chocolate I was raised on, but I have developed a strong preference for alkalized chocolate/cocoa.  Non alkalized chocolate tends to have a fruitiness that I just don't resonate with.  At least some do.  Scharffen Berger, for instance, is almost painfully fruity.

 

I'm shopping for baking chocolate and I'm not coming up with too many alkalized options, so... I'm considering alkalizing the chocolate myself.

 

Any thoughts? Baking soda?  Washing soda? Heat (above melting temp)? Time? I'm just looking for pH neutral.  Oreo level cocoa has no flavor to me whatsoever. 

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What recipe do you want to use this in? Perhaps just dutched cocoa with an addition of fat to replace the alkalized chocolate.

 

The cocoa mass that I have purchased in the past wouldn't be called fruity I'd say. Wouldn't say it's dutched but it's pretty basic chocolate flavour.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

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I think perhaps you just need to find the right brand and blend for your palate. Some are pretty fruity, but I find some of the higher percentage varieties from Felchlin to be intensely chocolate without that fruity flavour. I'm really enjoying the 65% Maracaibo Clasificado at the moment.

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2 hours ago, scott123 said:

Oreo level cocoa has no flavor to me whatsoever. 

 

What is Oreo level cocoa?

 

i agree with Chris and Kerry, fruitiness may be found in particular blends or origins, but there are plenty of chocolates without strong  berry or raisin notes. 

 

Where are you and what brands are available?  I, too like Felchlin but it’s not readily available to retail consumers. I prefer valrhona cocoa powder, also not sure if you can find that retail. 


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

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Valrhona have at least one retail version of their cocoa powder. I know, since I bought some earlier.

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I have to add, you get what you pay for.  Can you get great chocolate or cocoa for $6/lb or less retail?  All the chocolates I use are more than that wholesale.  Yes there are less expensive chocolates but I'm trying to make a premium product and I'm willing to pay $10/lb for certain couvertures.  I'll try to remember to look at chocolate next time I'm at Trader Joe's  and see what looks good.

 

Also check cash & carry restaurant supply stores, they might have guittard, calleabaut, or ghirardelli but probably in large (11 lb) blocks.  Natural foods stores and stores with good bulk sections might have broken-up blocks of decent chocolate at a good price point.

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Since chocolate liquor/baking chocolate is roughly half cocoa butter and half cocoa solids, you could probably mix equal parts by weight of your favorite alkalized cocoa powder and cocoa butter. If a recipe called for 2 ounces of unsweetened chocolate, you could melt 1 ounce of cocoa butter then stir in 1 ounce of cocoa powder and proceed with the rest of the recipe.

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On 10/24/2018 at 9:10 AM, pastrygirl said:

 

Also check cash & carry restaurant supply stores, they might have guittard, calleabaut, or ghirardelli but probably in large (11 lb) blocks.  Natural foods stores and stores with good bulk sections might have broken-up blocks of decent chocolate at a good price point.

 

Guittard is very good quality for price IMO and is also sometimes retail - In my area they are found at bristol farms. Barry Callebaut is also relatively easy to find. 

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On 10/24/2018 at 8:28 AM, keychris said:

I think perhaps you just need to find the right brand and blend for your palate. 

 

This. Not all fine chocolate is fruity. And while I love fruity chocolates, I agree with the OP on Scharffen Berger. It tastes like cherry cough syrup to me—one-dimensional, unbalanced fruitiness.

 

If you read reviews, you'll find mention of chocolates that emphasize bass notes ... cocoa bitterness, caramel, leather, smoke, wood, spices. Chocolate variety, processing, and roast level all play a part in this. 

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