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Mullinix18

Escoffier's 40 minute scrambled eggs

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I have seen referenced in several places on the internet, including Wikipedia, a stat about escoffier recommending 40 minutes for scrambled eggs in a Bain Marie. I cant find where this number is from. On Wikipedia it refers to the book I currently own, the "Escoffier le guide culinaire" with forward by Heston Blumenthal by h. L. Cracknell...specificly page 157 for the 40 minute cooking time of scrambled eggs but it's not in my book on that page! Even tho there is the recipe for scrambled eggs on that page... I've seen the 1903 first edition online.. And it's not in there either.... Where is this number from?? Id like to know in case there is some even more complete book or something out there that I'm missing. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you. 

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I have the 1969 published "The Escoffier Cookbook and guide to the fine art of cookery"  which is a translation of the book Guide Culinaire published in France.  On page 180 under "459-Scrambled Eggs" he says this, if it is of any assistance...no time mentioned:

 

"In old cookery, scrambled eggs were sanctioned only when cooked in a bain-marie.  This measure certainly ensured their being properly cooked, but it lengthened the procedure.  The latter may therefore be shortened by cooking the eggs the usual way, in a pan in direct contact with the fire; but in this case the heat must be moderate, in order that, the process of cooking being progressive and gradual, perfect incorporation of the eggs (effecting the smoothness of the preparation) may result."

 

Sorry that's all I've got.  Except the number 157 might be the number of the entry, like the 459 above.


Edited by Okanagancook (log)

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Ok so I guess I can cross that particular translation off as the harbinger of this irritatingly hidden information that I am totally stuck on. 

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My edition (1965, Andre Simon foreword) says "In the old days, scrambled eggs were made in a bain-marie; there was more certainty of them being perfectly cooked, but the operation took longer." No mention of time and the text recommends a heavy based pan over moderate heat with continual stirring. See my quote below to regain appropriate perspective on Wikipedia.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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That's what mine says too. I'm beginning to think that Wikipedia misled me... But someone else on this forum (in 2011) referenced this stat..i just think he's gone now so I can't ask him where he found that info

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