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David Ross

eG Cook-Off #80: The Aromatic, Exotic Flavors of Curry

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8 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

I'm sure you've described a tava elsewhere, but please refresh my memory. Is it essentially a massive flat hot surface? Would my cast-iron flat griddle do the trick? Why was your skillet only a fair substitute?

 

Thanks for the recipe. That bread looks delicious, and sounds dead easy. I want to try it. Will it puff the way pita does, or is it not supposed to? 

 

It’s just like a skillet but with only a tiny lip. Great for omelettes too. I think my pan at the cottage might be warped a bit, the breads took on more colour in the middle, it should have colour all over.

Yes, they puff up gloriously. 

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What a good job of a well made roti/chapatti. You folks are terrific even though this is not the cuisine you grew up on! 

A Tava has no lip, typically. It is a heavy cast iron flat disc and most often had no handle. A handle is a new invention over the past fifty years. You can have Tava’s of various types.

A clay tava is used upside down! Yes! You place it upside down on a wooden stove and cook roomali rotis on it. It gets intensely hot so the delicate rotis get roasted in seconds. 

A thin tava is used to make khakras or rotis that are re-roasted to make them very crisp and last for months. 

A thick tava that is completely flat is used for rotli the very thin breads of gujarat. A thick tava that is curved in the center is preferred for Lechhi (in gujarat) and Dosti Roti (in punjab). These are rotis that split into two discs after roasting. 

The tava that is shown in the picture has a lip. It is a crepe tava, excellent for dosas. 

And of course you can use anything for anything. 

Bhukhhad

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I use these two.  The solid one I got for $5 at the second hand store.  Made by Maruti and made in India.

The one with holes is much lighter.  I use this one quite a bit...a bit of char gets through to the bread from gas heating element.

If mine don't puff, I put them over the open flame and that usually does it.

 

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Posted (edited)

Okanagancook

I am delighted to see these. The solid tava or tawa is the kind I was speaking about. The one with the holes is much more interesting. It has the two extra upright rods for certain reasons. First, you can place this tava on an open flame stove or ‘chulha’. Then place your cooking pot on top of it. And behind the two slats you can place a ‘Soop’ or ‘Soopda’ which is a metal thingamijing for shaking the flax off the grains. Do you know what I mean? I can post pictures from the internet but I am not allowed to do that here. The reason for putting the soop behind the vessel is to have the flame concentrate under the vessel. So that is one purpose. 

The other purpose for those upright slats is for the time this tava is placed upside down on top of a vessel and some burning coals placed on top of that. It provides the DUM effect for both top and bottom heating. I have seen these slats on only very few pieces so I assume this style is older. Now you can buy a tava with holes without these slats. And I use it to roast papad on an open flame. Or puff rotis on a flame. Such tavas are also very useful if you have an electric ring burner. This allows you to move the roti from the solid tava to a surface that is not as hot as the electric rings and puff the rotis that way. You take off the tava each time and put it back on just when you want to puff the roti or roast the papad. 

What fun to see the gadgets all of you have discovered! 

Bhukkhad. 


Edited by Bhukhhad (log)
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11 hours ago, Bhukhhad said:

What fun to see the gadgets all of you have discovered! 

 

 

I will point out that British Columbia, where Okanagancook lives, has a large Indo-Canadian population (even by Canadian standards, and Canadians with roots in the subcontinent make up a substantial part of our population). Finding these cool things in secondhand stores is probably a bit more likely in BC than elsewhere, but you never know your luck. I have one in much the same style as Sartoric, but the handle of mine was cast as part of the pan (ie, all in one piece rather than attached separately). I found it in a second-hand shop in a semi-rural area of Nova Scotia, where such things are decidedly less common. :)

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

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"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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@Bhukhhad "Then place your cooking pot on top of it. And behind the two slats you can place a ‘Soop’ or ‘Soopda’ which is a metal thingamijing for shaking the flax off the grains. Do you know what I mean? I can post pictures from the internet but I am not allowed to do that here. The reason for putting the soop behind the vessel is to have the flame concentrate under the vessel. So that is one purpose. 

 

I am not sure about the soop or soopda.  I googled both and did not find what have described above.

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1 hour ago, Okanagancook said:

@Bhukhhad "Then place your cooking pot on top of it. And behind the two slats you can place a ‘Soop’ or ‘Soopda’ which is a metal thingamijing for shaking the flax off the grains. Do you know what I mean? I can post pictures from the internet but I am not allowed to do that here. The reason for putting the soop behind the vessel is to have the flame concentrate under the vessel. So that is one purpose. 

 

I am not sure about the soop or soopda.  I googled both and did not find what have described above.

Here is a little film I found on husking rice in India. The lady first beats the rice kernels with a stick in a specially designed container for this purpose. AFTER pounding the kernels she transfers them to a reed SOOP or SOOPDA. Then she bounces the kernels  with a twist of her wrist. I learned how to do this from my Mother I guess. Its fun to do. You basically bounce the kernels in such a way that the lighter husks separate from the heavier kernels. The husks come forward towards the lip of the Soop and can be shaken off of the soop while the kernels remain behind. 

I still use this method to de-skin roasted peanuts. We have started to get wonderful salt-roasted peanuts here in the USA. A brand called Sikandar Foods sells them in a vacuum seal pack. They are yummalicious! But the skin separates easily from the roasted peanuts because there is no oil outside keeping the skin attached. So one must remove the skins to enjoy the rest of the peanuts and this method, on a little plate, works!! 

However the soop is traditional and useful! The metal version of the soop is usually kept behing any pot that is on an open flame. That stops the breeze from blowing out the flame from behind. 

 

Bhukhhad

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Fascinating!  Thanks for finding that.

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On 6/26/2019 at 6:31 AM, chromedome said:

Finding these cool things in secondhand stores is probably a bit more likely in BC than elsewhere, but you never know your luck.

@Kerry Beal and I have come across them more than once in local thrift stores. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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The best ever spinach paneer. I like this dish and have cooked it many times using different recipes. This one from Rick Steins India is the simplest and creamiest (despite using no cream). It’s cooked in one pan, no blenders involved. I may never try another version. Served here with rice, paratha, cucumber raita, black lentils and mango pickle.

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@sartoric, that's high praise for a recipe. Do you have a link that you can share?


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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15 minutes ago, Smithy said:

@sartoric, that's high praise for a recipe. Do you have a link that you can share?

Sorry, no. There’s comparisons online which show various different palak paneer including his, but no recipes. I keep borrowing this book from the library, one day they might give it to me, ha ha. The thing I liked the most was the method - fry whole spices, add aromatics, add ground spices, fry the cheese, then tomato, add chopped spinach and yoghurt. Takes about 20 minutes.

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Found this instant curry at a Japanese market ... I am usually not a big fan of seafood curry, but this might be different 😉

 

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I love trying prepared curries , such as the above

 

too bad , they all seem to have way too much NsCl

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, rotuts said:

NsCl 

 

 

Perhaps you meant National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory! Or perhaps NaCl, which you could just as easily abbreviate to "salt" (same number of letters) and avoid misunderstanding.,


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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4 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Umamimart has a recipe for Japanese curry from scratch that I've made a couple times and love.  If only it were not so much effort.

 

https://umamimart.com/blogs/main/japanese-curry-scratch

 

 

 

Yeah, but where to get the whale meat required ..?

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3 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

 

From whales, obviously!  😀😀😀

 

 

My local store has been out of stock for a while... they say it's too expensive to bring in a whole whale for just a few customers...

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, KennethT said:

My local store has been out of stock for a while... they say it's too expensive to bring in a whole whale for just a few customers...

 

No vision! Any imaginative store owner could deal with that problem.  Market it as Premium Grade Japanese Elephant Blubber, for example. It would fly out like flying out things.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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From this weeks visit to the market ...

 

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It made me so ulset that I couldn’t buy the “tasting set” that I bought above whale curry to compensate ...

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