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Recommended chocolate molds?

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3 minutes ago, eugenep said:

I was planning to make chocolate molds with different fruit puree fillings based on the book "Making Artisan Chocolates" by Anders Garrison Shotts

 

Author makes 2lbs of chocolate per batch and he said you can't scale down or up and needs to be exact. 

 

So that's why I was planning to make exactly that much each time. 

 

Umm..I made chocolate truffles and fudge and just cover up the fat bloom with nuts 

 

Just got this overpriced burner - Control Freak by Breville - so wanted to start tempering the chocolate and start with chocolate molds. 

 

So far the best price I'm getting is from JB Prince but they don't specify if it's from Chocolate World / Pavoni etc. just some unspecified "European brand of high quality" that they won't name. I want the CW 2295 but the one I'm seeing that looks like it isn't the same and the dimensions are bigger at 

 

https://www.jbprince.com/pastry/sphere-chocolate-mold-24-molds.asp

 

I think I might get a bonbon size that's closer to 1 inch diameter rather than the above 1.44 inches diameter (too big?) 

 

Also, instead of a $30 chocolate scraper, I was planning to buy a $5 bench scraper to use to scrape chocolate off the mold. You think that'll work as a cheaper substitute? 

2 lbs of chocolate per batch is perhaps being a bit pedantic. I like to temper more than I'm going to need - so there is always lots of warm chocolate in the bowl to work with. 

 

If you want the CW2295 and don't want to order from Chocolat-chocolat in Montreal - you could order from Tomric. - costs a bit more typically but they have a decent supply of CW molds most of the time.

 

I buy Richard brand taping knives from hardware stores here in Canada - then get my hubby to run the edge with the buffing wheel to remove any burrs that might scratch my molds.

 

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32 minutes ago, eugenep said:

Author makes 2lbs of chocolate per batch and he said you can't scale down or up and needs to be exact. 

I checked Shotts, and indeed he says this. With all due respect to him, I disagree. If you look at Greweling or Notter, you will see percentages of ingredients in the recipes, and it is quite easy to scale them up or down. How else would large-production chocolatiers make larger amounts using the same recipes all the time? You need to enter the amounts that Shotts provides for each ingredient into a spreadsheet and multiply them by however many recipes-worth you want to make. So if all the ingredients add up to 600g and you want to make 1200g for more molds, you just multiply the quantity of each ingredient by 2. The final proportions will be exactly the same--though, of course, you will need more chocolate to make the shells and, in the case of something like caramel, the cooking time will be increased. I assume he must mean that if you want to make this recipe to fit this particular pan or mold, you need to stick to the quantities listed.

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13 hours ago, eugenep said:

based on the book "Making Artisan Chocolates" by Anders Garrison Shotts

 

Author makes 2lbs of chocolate per batch and he said you can't scale down or up and needs to be exact.


I have that book. I don't remember that particular bit of information about scaling being in there but, if it is, it's nonsense. You can scale ganache recipes (assuming that's what you're referring to since there is no information in that book that I recall on making your own chocolate) down to a very small amount or up as far as you have a container to accommodate very easily.

Edit: ignore this, didn't notice that the discussion had moved on to a second page and Jim had already addressed this.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)
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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Does anyone have experience with Chocolate World's Greenline molds? They're green, which is probably less ideal in terms of seeing how clean they are, but I'd be nice to hear from someone who has used them if that or something else is an issue with them (are they less sturdy than normal CW molds?).

 

I'm hoping to get sturdy molds, taking into consideration the advice given here many times: more of fewer models rather than vice versa. I'll get at least the CW2295, but then I'm wondering what would be "feasible" (bar/tablet) molds that are not impossible to get right without cooling tunnels etc as @teonzo advised? Below are my thoughts, it is much appreciated if anyone can help.

 

-Bonbons: CW2295 and one of the three GL114, CF1521 or CW1923. Question here is, are the Greenlines as good as CWs? Are the Chocolat Forms as good as CWs? Same CW factory I believe, but wonder if there's big differences still. 

 

-Bars/Tablets: one not to be filled CW2436 (I assume this is among easier bar forms?), then for filling PC10 or PC9 (unless Pop Chocolate molds are really not good or these are impossible to get right without a tunnel or other elaborate cooling systems?) or CW2299 /  GL113

 

-Additional ones if needed to get free shipping (I'll get more of the same molds if things get really going as per advice here!): CF0240 (feasible without tunnel?), CW1769 (same question + are those kind of grooves cleanable or a major major pain?), CF0247 (again, feasible?).

 

I'll also attach the latest bonbon with a quick banana-miso filling. I don't know how it looks to the pros, but I'm sort of feeling I can at least try to do something with chocolates (though yes, chocolate is the master, always). Many thanks for any comments on any of the molds! 

IMG_4216.JPG

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On 5/1/2020 at 4:39 AM, EsaK said:

Does anyone have experience with Chocolate World's Greenline molds? They're green, which is probably less ideal in terms of seeing how clean they are, but I'd be nice to hear from someone who has used them if that or something else is an issue with them (are they less sturdy than normal CW molds?).

 

I'm hoping to get sturdy molds, taking into consideration the advice given here many times: more of fewer models rather than vice versa. I'll get at least the CW2295, but then I'm wondering what would be "feasible" (bar/tablet) molds that are not impossible to get right without cooling tunnels etc as @teonzo advised? Below are my thoughts, it is much appreciated if anyone can help.

 

-Bonbons: CW2295 and one of the three GL114, CF1521 or CW1923. Question here is, are the Greenlines as good as CWs? Are the Chocolat Forms as good as CWs? Same CW factory I believe, but wonder if there's big differences still. 

 

-Bars/Tablets: one not to be filled CW2436 (I assume this is among easier bar forms?), then for filling PC10 or PC9 (unless Pop Chocolate molds are really not good or these are impossible to get right without a tunnel or other elaborate cooling systems?) or CW2299 /  GL113

 

-Additional ones if needed to get free shipping (I'll get more of the same molds if things get really going as per advice here!): CF0240 (feasible without tunnel?), CW1769 (same question + are those kind of grooves cleanable or a major major pain?), CF0247 (again, feasible?).

 

I'll also attach the latest bonbon with a quick banana-miso filling. I don't know how it looks to the pros, but I'm sort of feeling I can at least try to do something with chocolates (though yes, chocolate is the master, always). Many thanks for any comments on any of the molds! 

IMG_4216.JPG

ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY MOULDS MADE FROM 100% RECYCLED POLYCARBONATE

The ‘Greenline’ moulds are Chocolate World's contribution to a closed material cycle, giving new life to used plastics.

 

The ‘Greenline’ series, clearly recognisable by its light green, transparent design, includes no less than 18 different models.

The specific mould size,131x275x26 mm, makes the moulds only suitable for domestic applications.

 

 

I'm not sure what they mean by the mold size making them only suitable for domestic applications. I haven't seen these molds before.

 

 

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Hi guys, 

 

Been lurking here and reading a lot of good help, so let me give back now because my technique will have to improve to help on that front :)

 

I have both the "normal" and green line molds, albeit in different shapes. Got some during the early days of the lockdown as a new hobby and I'm really liking it so far. Made two batches and some truffels. Both pretty ok, but keep in mind I'm no pro.

 

I see no real difference between the two, but green is quite... well... green. If you are coloring, your view will probably be impacted.

 

Also, the clear ones are slightly thicker, but they feel equally sturdy. That is, I can with some force twist the molds lenghtwise, but not easily and only a bit.

 

As far as I'm concerned both are equally suited for molding.

 

Let me know if you'd like some comparison pictures or anything!

 

And to everyone reading, thanks for all the info here!

 

 

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28 minutes ago, DeDe said:

Hi guys, 

 

Been lurking here and reading a lot of good help, so let me give back now because my technique will have to improve to help on that front :)

 

I have both the "normal" and green line molds, albeit in different shapes. Got some during the early days of the lockdown as a new hobby and I'm really liking it so far. Made two batches and some truffels. Both pretty ok, but keep in mind I'm no pro.

 

I see no real difference between the two, but green is quite... well... green. If you are coloring, your view will probably be impacted.

 

Also, the clear ones are slightly thicker, but they feel equally sturdy. That is, I can with some force twist the molds lenghtwise, but not easily and only a bit.

 

As far as I'm concerned both are equally suited for molding.

 

Let me know if you'd like some comparison pictures or anything!

 

And to everyone reading, thanks for all the info here!

 

 

 

Thanks DeDe! Good to hear you feel they're equally sturdy etc. Surely if there's a need to be real precise with colorings, then yep, that green isn't going to help it.

 

I'll actually get my mold shipment on Wednesday, went with GL109 in addition to CW2295 and CW2184 for bonbons, to see what the Greenline is like. I shall report back here in case there's anyone interested if my (also non-professional to be sure!) findings are the same as yours. 

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On the Greenline molds, in my amateur opinion, they feel quite like the regular Chocolate World molds as DeDe said too. They are 4cm narrower, so for example the GL109 holds 3 x 8 chocolates, instead of the regular 4 x 8 pieces. I've asked them why they are labeled for domestic use only as Kerry noted. With my very limited experience and small batches I'm perhaps even leaning towards the GLs being easier to use and handle. I think it's advised not to touch the underside of the molds to not heat them with your fingers, so the CWs are quite big to handle. The GLs you can hold from the sides with one hand since they are narrower.

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10 minutes ago, EsaK said:

On the Greenline molds, in my amateur opinion, they feel quite like the regular Chocolate World molds as DeDe said too. They are 4cm narrower, so for example the GL109 holds 3 x 8 chocolates, instead of the regular 4 x 8 pieces. I've asked them why they are labeled for domestic use only as Kerry noted. With my very limited experience and small batches I'm perhaps even leaning towards the GLs being easier to use and handle. I think it's advised not to touch the underside of the molds to not heat them with your fingers, so the CWs are quite big to handle. The GLs you can hold from the sides with one hand since they are narrower.

 

The regular line of CW molds includes both sizes; indeed it appears to be standard in the business to use those two sizes and no others. The smaller molds are 275mm x 135mm (often 3 x 7 or 3 x 8 cavities, but the number varies depending on the shape of the cavity), and the larger ones are 275mm x 175mm (sometimes the 4 x 8 layout you mentioned, but even 5 x 8 is possible). I agree with the earlier post that suggested the color of the Greenline molds would almost certainly interfere with selecting colors for the shell.

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21 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

The regular line of CW molds includes both sizes; indeed it appears to be standard in the business to use those two sizes and no others. The smaller molds are 275mm x 135mm (often 3 x 7 or 3 x 8 cavities, but the number varies depending on the shape of the cavity), and the larger ones are 275mm x 175mm (sometimes the 4 x 8 layout you mentioned, but even 5 x 8 is possible). I agree with the earlier post that suggested the color of the Greenline molds would almost certainly interfere with selecting colors for the shell.

 

Duh, I don't know but for some reason I don't think I had registered that there were 135mm versions of the 2295 for example! 

 

Chocolat Form replied that the GL line is slightly thinner material and therefore less resistant than the CW line. They're also 131mm (instead of 135mm) and limited in terms of models. So I guess there isn't an absolute reason why they'd be just for domestic use, if you can just find the designs you want (they do make GL molds from any design if you order at least 500 pieces). 

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Tried to find discussions on this but couldn't find, so here goes. I haven't been able to produce full molds where all 32 pieces fall out, or even close really. It's been a play between banging the mold onto a table, putting it into the fridge, flexing the mold, and then banging some more to get the pieces out. 

 

I think it was @teonzo who has been saying that polycarbonate molds shouldn't be put into the freezer. I've avoided that to not damage the molds, but I'm wondering if it's really good to bang them onto a table either, or the bit of flexing one may do to get pieces out? Do those things really damage the molds or is it something they can handle for years?

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3 hours ago, EsaK said:

Tried to find discussions on this but couldn't find, so here goes. I haven't been able to produce full molds where all 32 pieces fall out, or even close really. It's been a play between banging the mold onto a table, putting it into the fridge, flexing the mold, and then banging some more to get the pieces out. 

 

I think it was @teonzo who has been saying that polycarbonate molds shouldn't be put into the freezer. I've avoided that to not damage the molds, but I'm wondering if it's really good to bang them onto a table either, or the bit of flexing one may do to get pieces out? Do those things really damage the molds or is it something they can handle for years?

When I have some that don't come out - I put them in the freezer for 3 minutes before knocking them out.

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On 5/20/2020 at 4:29 PM, Kerry Beal said:

When I have some that don't come out - I put them in the freezer for 3 minutes before knocking them out.

Same here. Freeze and bang.

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