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Darienne

Darienne

15 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

I'm just wondering why you're doing this in the first place, since bags of regular wheat flour aren't usually super-expensive. If the GF flour isn't something you need, I'd either find someone who does need/want it, or dump it.

 

This is assuming that what you're referring to as "non-gluten flour" is in fact some form of gluten-free flour, rather than a wheat flour that isn't specifically meant to be stronger or higher in gluten.

I guess the reason that I'm doing it is that it's sitting in two containers, one small and one larger, in my cupboard and I can just combine them and use them in non-baking recipes as noted above.


I guess another reason is that I don't know anyone in my acquaintance list who uses gluten-free flour.  Most of my immediate neighbors...we live in the country so we are not exactly 'surrounded' by neighbors...work full time and don't really cook much anyway. 

 

And I guess probably the most important reason I'm doing this is that I'm closing in on 80 years old and have been frugal my entire life, along with my husband Ed, and I can't imagine dumping something which, with a bit of work, can be used satisfactorily. 

 

You did ask.

Darienne

Darienne

9 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

I'm just wondering why you're doing this in the first place, since bags of regular wheat flour aren't usually super-expensive. If the GF flour isn't something you need, I'd either find someone who does need/want it, or dump it.

 

This is assuming that what you're referring to as "non-gluten flour" is in fact some form of gluten-free flour, rather than a wheat flour that isn't specifically meant to be stronger or higher in gluten.

I guess the reason that I'm doing it is that it's sitting in two containers, one small and one larger, in my cupboard and I can just combine them and use them in non-baking recipes as noted above.


I guess another reason is that I don't know anyone in my acquaintance list who uses gluten-free flour.  Most of my immediate neighbors...we live in the country so we are not exactly 'surrounded' by neighbors...work full time and don't really cook much anyway. 

 

And I guess probably the most important reason I'm doing this is that I'm closing in on 80 years old and have been frugal my entire life, along with my husband Ed, and I can't imagine dumping something which, with a bit of work, can be used satisfactorily. 

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