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Anna N

Rice cookers for singletons

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3 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Most rice cookers do not work on timers, but on a thermostat basis. When all the water is absorbed, the temperature rises above boiling point, switching the machine to 'keep warm' mode.


Sounds good to me. I was just guessing about the timer, I've never been curious enough to actually research it.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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4 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Does the rice cooker you have @Anna N and @Tri2Cook only cook white rice or does it do others as well?

I have the Zo induction rice cooker and it will cook any kind of rice or mixed grains, pilaf and have even used it for pasta, setting a timer and shutting it off when I estimate the pasta will be done. (I did some testing)

I have posted at length about this Zo before in another thread from a few years ago.  

 

I got the 10 cup because the price at the time was the same as the 5 cup and I make larger batches anyway and portion the extra rice, vac seal and freeze it for fried rice or adding to soups, stews, salads or even to make rice pudding.

 

I posted the following in 2014.
"Posted June 8, 2014
I live alone but I have the 10 cup Zojirushi IH rice cooker.  I cook 4-5 cup batches (or larger) of various types of rice (and other grains) and freeze the "extra" in 1or 2 cup portions so I always have some cooked rice on hand for adding to soups, stir fries, nasi goring or plain fried rice, rice puddings or fruit puddings, for adding to breads, both yeast and quick breads, rice fritters, in omelets or in burritos, with beans. 

 

They do not "boil over" so there is no worry in that regard. 

 

And it can be used as a steamer for potatoes, vegetables, and other things.  Check the recipes here.

 

There are some cookbooks but you don't really need one - there are plenty of recipes right on the Zojirushi site and you can subscribe to their email newsletter that has new ideas every month.  (Zojirushi 101)"


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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10 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Most rice cookers do not work on timers, but on a thermostat basis. When all the water is absorbed, the temperature rises above boiling point, switching the machine to 'keep warm' mode. So, it can cook any type of rice. It doesn't care what is in the pot. With brown rice, it takes longer for the water to be absorbed, so it is cooked longer.

Thanks. If  I had not been quite so tired last night I would’ve remembered this.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I know the topic here is rice cookers, not other appliances, but I'd like to mention that I have had good success cooking small amounts of rice (white and brown) and other grains in the Instant Pot, using the pot-in-pot method.

I've cooked as little as a single serving (40 ml rice + 40 ml water) and it came out fine. 

With pot-in-pot, you can't use the "rice" setting but have to set a manual time.  Depending on the rice and the sort of bowl you choose (a thick glass bowl will require a couple more minutes than a thin metal bowl) you may need to play around a little to find the right setting but once you do, I've found it to be reproducible.  

 

I usually cook a full cup, portion and freeze but some days I don't want to add more things to my freezer and I've found this method to be quite handy.

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I use the pressure cooker to pressure steam rice.

 

I can do any quantity from one teaspoon rice to whatever size pot that will fit inside the PC.

 

No burned bottoms. With a non-stick pot, clean up is easy.

 

dcarch

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1 hour ago, dcarch said:

I use the pressure cooker to pressure steam rice.

 

I can do any quantity from one teaspoon rice to whatever size pot that will fit inside the PC.

 

No burned bottoms. With a non-stick pot, clean up is easy.

 

dcarch

 

10 hours ago, Anna N said:

Thanks. If  I had not been quite so tired last night I would’ve remembered this.

Another good reason to buy the Ipot Mini.   🙄

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I've been using a donabe rice cooker for the past couple of months, and the results are pretty spectacular. The one featured in this video is the largest offered -- a 5 cup model. It's definitely overkill for a single person, as is the 3-cup model that I have. But they also offersmaller 1 and 2 cup versions that would be great for singletons. They require a gas flame, but you can get a powerful, portable tabletop Iwatani butane burner for like $35. Those are great for camping/catering/outdoor searing/fish cookery as well as donabe cooking.. But I digress. The ceramic also requires some special care compared to your 30 function electric nonstick multipot rice-cooking thingamabob. It also requires slightly more technique than plug-and-play solutions. But not much. I love cooking with mine. 

 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, btbyrd said:

I've been using a donabe rice cooker for the past couple of months, and the results are pretty spectacular. The one featured in this video is the largest offered -- a 5 cup model. It's definitely overkill for a single person, as is the 3-cup model that I have. But they also offersmaller 1 and 2 cup versions that would be great for singletons. They require a gas flame, but you can get a powerful, portable tabletop Iwatani butane burner for like $35. Those are great for camping/catering/outdoor searing/fish cookery as well as donabe cooking.. But I digress. The ceramic also requires some special care compared to your 30 function electric nonstick multipot rice-cooking thingamabob. It also requires slightly more technique than plug-and-play solutions. But not much. I love cooking with mine. 

 

That's very interesting looking, I'm tempted simply because its just really cool.

 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, btbyrd said:

I've been using a donabe rice cooker for the past couple of months, and the results are pretty spectacular. The one featured in this video is the largest offered -- a 5 cup model. It's definitely overkill for a single person, as is the 3-cup model that I have. But they also offersmaller 1 and 2 cup versions that would be great for singletons. They require a gas flame, but you can get a powerful, portable tabletop Iwatani butane burner for like $35. Those are great for camping/catering/outdoor searing/fish cookery as well as donabe cooking.. But I digress. The ceramic also requires some special care compared to your 30 function electric nonstick multipot rice-cooking thingamabob. It also requires slightly more technique than plug-and-play solutions. But not much. I love cooking with mine. 

 

A very pretty pot.  I'm not sure I need a donabe but I don't have a donabe.  I bookmarked a couple items from the site!  Why shouldn't clayware work with an electric stove as long as one took precautions?  Also I thought if not using a rice cooker, the Japanese traditionally prepared rice in an iron vessel?

 

So until I get the iron rice maker that Zojirushi won't export I'll stick to the one I have.  I'd sleep with it if it were not so big and heavy.

 

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It looks like Amazon has a Prime eligible 2-cup model for $99, They're only for gas burners though. I don't know why a flat top wouldn't work; I just know that every single resource I've found has said not to use them with anything except a gas flame. You can also put them in the oven. But if you're heating it directly, it's gotta be a flame for whatever reason.

 

Anyway, they're a great way to cook rice. If you add a tablespoon or two of oil to the donabe and let it go for a minute or two longer, you can get a wonderfully golden brown and delicious crust on the bottom of the rice. Speaking of golden brown and delicious crusty bottoms, you can see a bit of that in this video for chicken ginger rice:

 

 

You can check out how they're made in the following video; the donabes made by Iga Mono are featured in the first segment.

 

 

Here's a link to the best single English-language book on Japanese donabe cookery, Naoko Moore and Kyle Connaughton's "Donabe: Classic and Modern Clay Pot Cooking." 

 

Warning: Donabes can be habit forming.

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I put a hold on the book, can't wait to read it.  But I don't have gas and my landlord would take a dim view of charcoal.  I've successfully used my unglazed tajine on the electric stovetop.

 

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Son gave his rice cooker to his girlfriend - he's currently using the smaller pressure cooker (2.5 liter) of a Fissler 2-pot pressure-cooker set. No soaking, bring up to high pressure, cook for 50-60 seconds, turn off, leave until pressure drops. Recipes often say 3 to 5 minutes, but with modern pressure cookers and small amounts of rice, some people just turn the pressure cooker off as soon as it comes to pressure, and generally 50 seconds at pressure is enough. 

 As sons and nephews move in and out of Japan, we've tried microwave rice cookers (OK, not necessarily speedier), pot on stove (perfectly fine, if you have more than one burner so that you can cook something else while the rice does its stuff), and small electric rice cookers. I don't like the Black & Decker type shown upthread (with a loose glass lid rather than a clip-down lid) as they are a lot less efficient.

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On 8/22/2018 at 9:23 PM, ElsieD said:

Does the rice cooker you have @Anna N and @Tri2Cook only cook white rice or does it do others as well?

I currently have the Black & Decker, and in the past have owned the Rival, Toastess and Walmart generic (Durabrand?) equivalents. Cheap pieces of crap, in short. :)

I've used them all for brown rice, red rice, multigrain blends, quinoa, millet, freekeh and whatever else I've had on hand. Some rices require a great deal of rinsing for a good result, but that's not the cooker's fault (the generic store brand from Sobey's was especially bad, I had to rinse it maybe a dozen times before the water began to run clear). Basically, as long as it cooks by absorption and you've measured accurately, you're good to go. The pot will continue cooking until all the water is absorbed, at which point the temperature rises above the boiling point and the pot switches to "keep warm" mode. Easy-peasy.

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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4 minutes ago, chromedome said:

I currently have the Black & Decker, and in the past have owned the Rival, Toastess and Walmart generic (Durabrand?) equivalents. Cheap pieces of crap, in short. :)

I've used them all for brown rice, red rice, multigrain blends, quinoa, millet, freekeh and whatever else I've had on hand. Some rices require a great deal of rinsing for a good result, but that's not the cooker's fault (the generic store brand from Sobey's was especially bad, I had to rinse it maybe a dozen times before the water began to run clear). Basically, as long as it cooks by absorption and you've measured accurately, you're good to go. The pot will continue cooking until all the water is absorbed, at which point the temperature rises above the boiling point and the pot switches to "keep warm" mode. Easy-peasy.

 

As I've already explained.

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LOL Yup. It's still early in my time zone, and the blood level is unreasonably high in my caffeine system.

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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