Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Figs!

Recommended Posts

My Spanish teacher brought me a bucket (literally) of fresh figs. These are the white or green type, green with a blush of brownish purple. I still have jam left from the last year when she brought me figs, so I'm looking for other ways to use them. And quickly--they're perfectly ripe. I have recipes for appetizers with blue cheese and a fig-walnut tart, but if anyone has a different way to use them, and ideally a way to preserve them for future use, I'd be quite grateful. She has 5 trees, so there's no shortage if I want more. Frankly I don't know what I'd do with 5 trees loaded with figs, and I don't know how she uses them other than to eat fresh and give the rest to the birds.

 

Thanks for your ideas!

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

David Lebovitz has a fig ice cream in his book The Perfect Scoop which is pretty good, assuming you are OK with the texture of the seeds as they are sort of tough to strain out of the thick base (I never bother). I also like to just freeze figs whole in bags to eat out of hand, they are really good cold like this if you let them soften just for a minute or two. Also brulee them to use as an accompaniment to desserts. 

 

Edit: here's the ice cream 


Edited by Yiannos Added link (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nancy, I had bought frozen figs from Trader Joe’s that were bagged and called “partially dried” or something similar...they were not fully dehydrated, but they did remove some of the moisture, and they were great when defrosted. Still soft, but not watery as frozen fruit gets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am about to bestir myself to turn 8 pounds of figs into fig jam. 

 

  • Like 3
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

I have a dehydrator, though I think I may have to cut some of these in half--they're huge. I've seen smaller plums.

 

Thanks--N. in P.

 

I have a dehydrator and have often found some forgotten figs in the fridge that dehydrated on their own.   Always a treat

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Egulleteer's Kasia has a  recipe for white bean and fresh fig salad that I just had a bunch of students make at a summer camp. They were a bit heavy-handed with the parsley, which was a pity, but also with the blueberries, which work very well in this salad! We served it on a bed of small salad greens.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Out of 10 pounds of figs (including 3 pounds made into puree last week and refrigerated, that I added back into the jam pot today), I wound up with two pints and 12 half-pints of fig jam. I also FINALLY got the gallon of sweet-hot-dill chips (the ones to which @Kim Shook referred recently when she made "pickles out of pickles," and don't knock 'em until you've tried 'em) broken down into pint jars and processed.

 

Tomorrow, peach puree, peach butter, frozen peaches, whatever I take a notion for, and caponata. Then I'm through until the pears and the Arkansas Black apples come in.

 

 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a deliciously addictive recipe I found on the California fig producers website. I suppose it could be frozen but I doubt it would last that long, given how good it is.

 

California Fig Bars

16 oz. figs, stemmed and chopped medium-fine

1/2 c. chopped walnuts

1/3 c. sugar

1/4 c. rum or orange juice (I used rum, of course)

2 Tbs. hot water

1/2 c. butter, softened

1 c. packed brown sugar

1 large egg

1-1/2 c. all purpose flour

1/2 tsp,. baking soda

pinch of salt

1-1/4 c. old fashioned oats

 

Heat oven to 350F. Coat a 13x9-inch baking pan with cooking spray. Combine figs, walnuts, sugar, rum and hot water; set aside. Beat together butter and sugar until creamy. Add egg and mix until smooth. Stir in flour, salt, and baking soda; blend in oats to make a soft dough. Reserve 1 c. of flour mixture. With floured fingertips, press thin even layer of remaining dough on the bottom of prepared pan. Firmly pat fig mixture over dough. Drop reserved dough by teaspoonfuls over top, allowing fig mixture to show between drops. Bake 30 minutes until golden brown. Cool completely in pan. Drizzle with rum glaze. Makes 36 bars.

 

Rum Glaze: Stir together 1/2 c. powdered sugar and 3-4 tsp. rum or orange juice until smooth.

 

In retrospect, I think I could have used less sugar, because these are pretty sweet, partially because the glaze is very sweet. Doesn't mean we didn't want to eat the entire pan, of course. I also think it would have been improved by the addition of an herbal element--thyme perhaps.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How timely as we had bought some figs this past weekend, plus our farmers' markets are loaded with them

 

DSC06231.JPG.907771b6d99cf079d3969cbcfcbb96c4.JPG

 

DSC06234.JPG.900dccb59fd3acd88c0370296da9c87b.JPG

 

DSC06236.JPG.bff5d9584c7a723d33bbbc93d393e79b.JPG

 

DSC06250-001.JPG.5a1ba1b75cd7980fcdfadec5ba7ad8c5.JPG

 

DSC06253-001.JPG.c3fa8722341ab1cdd8f59a6f9fa4330e.JPG

 

Fig and sweet red pepper salad with mint and crème fraîche

 

Dressing consists of crushed mint leaves macerated in a solution of 1:1 lemon juice and white wine vinegar, into which was whisked some crème fraîche, fruity extra-virgin olive oil, salt and black pepper.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/12/2018 at 7:37 PM, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

In retrospect, I think I could have used less sugar, because these are pretty sweet, partially because the glaze is very sweet. Doesn't mean we didn't want to eat the entire pan, of course. I also think it would have been improved by the addition of an herbal element--thyme perhaps.

 

I would suggest substituting a part of sugar with chestnut honey, it pairs well with figs and being bitter it cuts the sweetness. Also I would suggest using rosemary, I love the combo figs + chestnut honey + rosemary.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×