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Rajala

Custard creme recipe with powdered cream(?)

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I'm following a recipe in a book by Stéphane Leroux (Praliné) and it calls for a "custard cream for mousseline". All good so far, but when I start reading the ingredients list for this it asks for powdered cream, what the hell?  I've seen this online, but it seems to mostly be some kind of vegetable fat mix, and I have no idea if that is what was used for this, or some very specific product.

 

Recipe;

 

1000 ml milk

1 vanilla bean

125 gram granulated sugar

250 gram egg yolks

100 gram granulated sugar

100 gram powdered cream (to be used warm)

 

Heat the milk with the split vanilla stick and 125 gam of the sugar in a saucepan. Mix the egg yolks with the 100 gram of granulated sugar and the powdered cream in a mixing bowl. Pour part of the hot milk onto this mixture and return everything to the saucepan. Whisk the mixture until boiling point is reached. Pour the mixture onto a tray covered with plastic wrap. over the surface of the custard cream with a plastic wrap and cool rapidly.

 

Anyone know more about powdered cream? Anything I can use for a substitute? Should I look for another recipe for this custard cream for mousseline, whatever that now might be? Anyone with any experience here?

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I happen to have some powdered heavy cream that I bought for chocolate experiments, but I wouldn't say it's a common or easily available ingredient.  (I bought this via Amazon).  It does taste like cream rather than like butter, but it's mostly fat so I think you could substitute butter, whisked in at the end.  Or, instead of the 1000 ml milk, try something like 800 ml milk and 200 ml heavy cream to boost the fat content.

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I found some from Amazon Germany now when I searched there. Bought earlier but it ended up being that vegetable fat mix thing. This seems to be 100 percent cream powder though. Might be stupid, but whenever I try a recipe I really want to use what's in there if possible. You know, to get as close as possible to the product made by the author. :) 

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This is another example of a text written/translated by someone with no professional experience (seems like a frequent happening with this book).

 

After reading the recipe I'm pretty sure that the original French term was "poudre à crème", somehow it was translated as "powdered cream". "Poudre à crème" is a product used only in France to thicken/gel custards, flans and so on. As far as I know it's a given in France (meaning they think everyone else should know what it is), while outside that country it's almost unknown (even in Belgium). "Poudre à crème" is a mixture that can vary in its composition, it's mainly modified cornstarch (including dextrines), some producers add vanillin, others not, and so on with minimal differences. You can substitute it with the starches you use for you go-to pastry cream recipe (this is a basic pastry cream recipe, after that you'll have to add butter and hazelnut praliné to make the mousseline).

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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Thank you Teo! Very helpful.

 

This is like a "base recipe" which the mousseline recipe refers to in the book. 

 

The full recipe calls for 550 gram of this base recipe, with 50 gram hazelnut praliné 50%, 50 gram hazelnut paste and 250 gram butter.

 

Based on what you wrote here and earlier, I think the translation is pretty awful to be honest, there are some parts in descriptions that really don't make much sense either. Or maybe it's just me not being a native English speaker. :D 

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I instantly thought "okay, I need cream powder for this," when I read the recipe without thinking that it was missing some kind of ingredient to actually make it a custard. :D 

 

A search on Google for poudre à crème, shows you a product that looks very similar to the custard mixes you can find out there.

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On 7/31/2018 at 8:24 PM, Rajala said:

I'm following a recipe in a book by Stéphane Leroux (Praliné) and it calls for a "custard cream for mousseline". All good so far, but when I start reading the ingredients list for this it asks for powdered cream, what the hell?  I've seen this online, but it seems to mostly be some kind of vegetable fat mix, and I have no idea if that is what was used for this, or some very specific product.

 

Recipe;

 

1000 ml milk

1 vanilla bean

125 gram granulated sugar

250 gram egg yolks

100 gram granulated sugar

100 gram powdered cream (to be used warm)

 

Heat the milk with the split vanilla stick and 125 gam of the sugar in a saucepan. Mix the egg yolks with the 100 gram of granulated sugar and the powdered cream in a mixing bowl. Pour part of the hot milk onto this mixture and return everything to the saucepan. Whisk the mixture until boiling point is reached. Pour the mixture onto a tray covered with plastic wrap. over the surface of the custard cream with a plastic wrap and cool rapidly.

 

Anyone know more about powdered cream? Anything I can use for a substitute? Should I look for another recipe for this custard cream for mousseline, whatever that now might be? Anyone with any experience here?

I have noticed that most of the culinary courses i have done, when the chef gives the recipe it is not the run of the mill ingredients. there is always some of the things that is not readily available on the market. sometimes i use what is available or just pass the recipe altogether. They have custard powder itself on the market.

 


Edited by Jamal12 (log)

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