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CanadianHomeChef

New Toy: Breville/Polyscience Control Freak!

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@ocd That's correct. I imagine the company recommends using at a lower setting because plug adapters are notoriously cheap pieces of crap (even the expensive ones) amongst those in the industry and running high amounts of current through them for extended periods of time tend to make them melt.  That, coupled with the liability that a NEMA 5-15 15A outlet should be used with a 15A breaker, which at 1800W for an extended time could cause older breakers to trip.

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The American version is 1800 watts and has a 15 amp plug... so I'm thinking it's just overkill Canadian standards. Looks like they got over them though, as Canada is getting a 15 amp plug model according to TesTek, that's why they are clearing out their old stock.

 

My model is currently plugged into a 20amp outlet, but I had it in a 15 amp outlet for a couple months in BC, and had no problem with it tripping the breaker.

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Made a couple of French omelettes last weekend - thanks so much @CanadianHomeChef for sharing the recipe! Watching this video also helped, especially with the plating technique (covering frying pan with a plate then flipping it).

 

What I've learned:

- the key is not to get too greedy with the fillings or it becomes difficult to wrap it up (I used basil, tomato, ham and cheese for fillings)

- 228F works really well

- it took me a little longer than 2 minutes, more like 3-4 minutes (probably due to difference in frying pan induction characteristics)

omelette.jpg

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Made some Hollandaise sauce this weekend - recipe courtesy of @CanadianHomeChef (also found a similar recipe on PolyScience Culinary website along with their YouTube video by one of their chefs, David Pietranczyk). Turned out great (despite the fact that I forgot to switch to probe control at first), maybe a little too lemon'ey for our taste (will try to use less lemon juice in the future). I really liked how simple it was - just throw it all in at the same time, no need for a vinegar reduction or bain marie or anything like that.

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Has anyone had any issues with their control freak tripping their circuit? I'm based in the US and I'm noticing that even if it's the only thing plugged in, it tends to trip the circuit when I lift the pan.

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Got one a couple of weeks ago ($1499 from JB Prince, via Amazon), but haven't had any spare time to use it yet 😢. So I'm taking it with me to the eGullet Chocolate and Confectionery Workshop this weekend for everyone to play with.

 

 

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17 hours ago, PositiveMD said:

Has anyone had any issues with their control freak tripping their circuit? I'm based in the US and I'm noticing that even if it's the only thing plugged in, it tends to trip the circuit when I lift the pan.

No trouble. I run it on a 20 amp circuit though. I only ever had issues when I brought it to a friends house who had aluminum wires. Plugged it into the outlet connected to the stove solved that problem. 

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I think my circuit is set to trip at 16ish amps so I may be out of luck until I move to another apartment. I'm guessing I should look for places that have 20 amp circuits then?

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hey - does anyone have the temperature for sweating onions without browning them? And in your experience, what was the length of time required to sweat? e.g., 5 min or 30 min etc.? 

 

I checked out sizzleandsear.com and tried to read this thread but didn't find anything yet

 

thanks 


"Hmmm....what would Don Quixote do?" 

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2 hours ago, eugenep said:

hey - does anyone have the temperature for sweating onions without browning them? And in your experience, what was the length of time required to sweat? e.g., 5 min or 30 min etc.? 

 

I checked out sizzleandsear.com and tried to read this thread but didn't find anything yet

 

thanks 

 

There used to be a cooking chart on the sizzleandsear site but it is no longer there.   I wonder what happened to it?  I have a chart that suggests sweating onions ar 300F.

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16 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

There used to be a cooking chart on the sizzleandsear site but it is no longer there.   I wonder what happened to it?  I have a chart that suggests sweating onions ar 300F.

ok - I'll try that at 300F then. 

 

I remember a long time ago when I sweated onions for an onion tart under Rose Levy Berenbaum's book for Pies and Tarts that took about 20 -30 min or so but it was like 6 onions or something. It stayed white in color and did not carmalize/brown. I hope I get that. I guess we'll see. I've come across 2 dinner recipes I wanted to do that required sweat onions that remain white in color. Hmmm...


"Hmmm....what would Don Quixote do?" 

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15 minutes ago, eugenep said:

ok - I'll try that at 300F then. 

 

I remember a long time ago when I sweated onions for an onion tart under Rose Levy Berenbaum's book for Pies and Tarts that took about 20 -30 min or so but it was like 6 onions or something. It stayed white in color and did not carmalize/brown. I hope I get that. I guess we'll see. I've come across 2 dinner recipes I wanted to do that required sweat onions that remain white in color. Hmmm...

 

Hope it works.  Let us know.

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14 minutes ago, CanadianHomeChef said:

I do it at 230f. I got that temp for garlic off another chart. Will try 300f next time. See which one to include on the chart here: https://sizzleandsear.com/precisioncooking/

yeah - I saw garlic sweat at 230f and carmelize onion at 275F or so but didn't see onion sweat

 

if someone found out eventually and maybe approximate time 5 min or 30 min that would be helpful to chart it 


"Hmmm....what would Don Quixote do?" 

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Hi all, proud new Control Freak owner here.

I've been following this thread for months and have finally had a chance to swing by Europe and purchase a unit (they don't sell them in the country where I live, and I needed the 220V model).

 

I'm excited to try it out, assuming the circuits in my home can handle it 🙂

 

A question to the pros here - do you know what the firmware update status for European units is?

Also, what features are actually enabled by the firmware updates (=how hard should I try to get updates for my unit)?

 

Thanks!

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I think the only feature that was updated on mine is that it won’t clear existing recipes if I copy recipes from one unit to another via USB. Instead it will just add to whatever was peexisting on the unit 

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Cooked some chicken wings tonight using the control freak.  First I cooked the wings sous vide at 165F for an hour.  They were then marinated in buttermilk to which a beaten egg had been added.  Then they were dredged in a flour mixture consisting of garlic salt, celery salt, salt, pepper and hot paprika.  The control freak was set to 350F and when the oil hit that temperature, they were tried just long enough to brown them.  Really good wings.

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12 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Cooked some chicken wings tonight using the control freak.  First I cooked the wings sous vide at 165F for an hour.  They were then marinated in buttermilk to which a beaten egg had been added.  Then they were dredged in a flour mixture consisting of garlic salt, celery salt, salt, pepper and hot paprika.  The control freak was set to 350F and when the oil hit that temperature, they were tried just long enough to brown them.  Really good wings.

20190611_191000.jpg

Coincidence. I did the same thing this weekend following Serious Eats recommendations. 160 for 2 hours. 3 minutes in 400 degree oil. No batter. Fall off the bone tenderness.

 

I added some Kansas City BBQ sauce that I made last month, vacuum sealed in my chamber, and froze. 

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Posted (edited)
54 minutes ago, CanadianHomeChef said:

Coincidence. I did the same thing this weekend following Serious Eats recommendations. 160 for 2 hours. 3 minutes in 400 degree oil. No batter. Fall off the bone tenderness.

 

I added some Kansas City BBQ sauce that I made last month, vacuum sealed in my chamber, and froze. 

 

I saw that as well.  I chose 165F for an hour as I fear squishy meat.  That's a hangover from my bbq comp judging days.


Edited by ElsieD (log)

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Another thing I've been wondering, and am not sure if it's been discussed here - the pans you're using.

 

Are you seeing a difference in either performance or accuracy (of the pan temp sensor) when using different pans? eg. a thinner pan/pot vs a tri-ply pan?

I'm asking because I only have 1 induction-ready non-stick pan, and while it works great, I'm wondering if my next purchase should be a quality tri-ply or something less thick.

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6 hours ago, AngelicLiar said:

Another thing I've been wondering, and am not sure if it's been discussed here - the pans you're using.

 

Are you seeing a difference in either performance or accuracy (of the pan temp sensor) when using different pans? eg. a thinner pan/pot vs a tri-ply pan?

I'm asking because I only have 1 induction-ready non-stick pan, and while it works great, I'm wondering if my next purchase should be a quality tri-ply or something less thick.

 

I haven't noticed anything.  But then, my stainless steel pans are a set so they would all behave the same way.

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